Most caught in middle of Chick-fil-A flap
by Pete Borden
August 10, 2012 01:06 AM | 1269 views | 5 5 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
“Whoever is found conducting himself in the manner of the people of Lot, kill the doer and the receiver.”

Can you tell me where I can find this Scripture passage? (Hint: It is not in the New Testament.)

In recent days there has been a glut of discussion on the issue of gay marriage, prompted by a response by Dan Cathy, president of Chick-fil-A, an avowed Baptist, on a religious program to a question regarding his beliefs on marriage. Two facts are outstanding in that regard.

First of all, Cathy made no anti-gay statement. The statement he made was positive, in support of what he believes to be the biblical definition of marriage. If it was anti-gay, it was also anti-divorce, anti-adultery and anti-fornication.

Second, this appears to an ambush job, designed to damage Chick-fil-A. Ken Coleman, the program host, knew when he asked the question what Cathy’s response would be, as did K.A. Blume, editor of the Biblical Recorder. If someone were planning to start a nationwide firestorm, surrounding a company, I can’t conceive of a faster way to do it.

Gay rights activists, almost as if on cue, jumped in with charges of an anti-gay agenda by Chick-fil-A. On the other side, we have radical religious groups, claiming Biblical support for the premise that homosexuality is a sin, based primarily on pre-Christian doctrine and the Law of Moses. Christ did not address the issue directly. There are passages in which Christ addressed marriage in the terms of the custom of the day, which was man and wife, except, of course, polygamy was prevalent throughout biblical times. So, what was the custom in Christ’s time?

When attempting to use the Bible to support such an argument, reference is made to passages in the writing of the disciples and later followers, each of whom may or may not, have been pushing his own agenda. It is known that the Gospels we read are not the only, and not necessarily the most accurate, Gospels written.

It would seem that the current nationwide fight is really between radicals on both sides of the issue. Gay activists insist that Chick-fil-A has an open anti-gay agenda, a charge which is without documentation. The organizations to which Cathy donates do not have negative agendas or mission statements. On the other side we have the religious radicals who insist upon referencing pre-Christian scripture, forgetting that Christ’s teachings were of love and compassion for all. He did not condemn gays, so why should I, or why should you?

Between the radical activists are the rest of us. We are told that everything is a sin or that nothing is a sin, that to disagree is to hate, that tolerance is unacceptable, that understanding is weakness and that one must be on one side or the other. None of these conditions describe how civilized people resolve differences.

In my discussions I have found friends, who normally are willing to rationally discuss any issue, now refusing to accept that my thoughts are motivated by anything short of ignorance, bigotry, hatred or blasphemy. I found that attitude to be equally true of straight and gay friends. I had to remind several friends of the times I have promoted their cause and stood beside them during conflicts. I also had to remind some other friends of the message of love Jesus brought, and that the church has too many internal problems to be bringing judgment against others.

The recent events will, if we allow them, drive a wedge in our society that will eventually destroy lives, families and friendships and bring great shame upon us as a people.

By the way, if you are still searching for the Scripture reading, you will not find it in the Bible. Moreover, you will not find any such command in the Bible. It is a direct quote from the Koran, the Scripture which formed the basis for the childhood religious teachings of President Obama.

As a friend of mine wisely pointed out “The struggle is not for gay rights. It is for equal rights” That’s a concept I find very difficult to argue against.

I am pretty sure, though, it has nothing to do with chicken sandwiches.

Pete Borden is a retired masonry consultant in east Cobb.
Comments
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URKiddingRight?
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August 10, 2012
As a friend of mine wisely pointed out “The struggle is not for gay rights. It is for equal rights” That’s a concept I find very difficult to argue against.

I concur and support that statement and that goal.

But is it REALLY a struggle for equal rights or is it a adamant demand for special rights?

It reminds me of the demand by some in the black community for reperations they feel is due them because of the distasteful institution of slavery.

It seems to me that the struggle is no longer about equality, but has evolved into something over and above that.

DavyJ
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August 10, 2012
But what does one quantify as special rights versus equal rights?

That lends itself to the "eye of the beholder" by disregarding "all men are created equal," in a rights discussion.

April4Christ
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August 10, 2012
Some might say special rights but it is a special right when your situation fits the "mold"... Marriage as defined in the original Hebrew Bible, long before a man translated it into any of the many translations we have today, didn't say man & woman... It has been added through translation and man's interpretation (& his opinion of how HE thinks God wanted it to be written) to become "man & woman". God designed each and every one of us from Adam & Eve to the last person that will be born before He sends Jesus for His second coming. In that design in being different, we are also to love all and be tolerant. Tolerant is not the same as accepting. I am ok being a same gender loving female, being fully active in a inclusive church that loves all people without judging and getting my nose in other people's business. I don't expect all to agree with me as I certainly do not agree with everybody else, however I respect & allow people to have their opinion and if I don't agree, then I am just fine with "we can agree to disagree". I wasn't really taught that growing up, I have learned that from life. Being a nanny for twins & triplets, working at Chick-fil-A for 9 yrs, working in many different office environments and driving in this lovely Atlanta traffic, where you can get stuck behind someone driving UNDER the speed limit (where the State Code of Ga allows you to drive 10 mph OVER & only GSP can use radar or laser & give you a ticket)...

People love to voice their opinion on many issues, but refuse to actually take action and be an actual voice in a controlled setting...
URKiddingRight?
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August 10, 2012
@DavyJ

Easy answer.

You don't provide preference to one person or group over another regardless of their background, race or beliefs.

Everyone one is treated equally.
Help a widow?
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August 10, 2012
Many folks, myself included went to Chick-fil-A and stood in a very long line just to support Mr. Cathy.

I wonder how many folks would stand in line for half an hour just for a chance to help a widow or an orphan.

Ouch!
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