Marietta middle-schooler pens first in adventure series
by Rachel Gray
October 20, 2013 12:14 AM | 2153 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Daniel Kumi, 12, son of Alex and Adelaide Kumi of Marietta, has published his third book, ‘Cats Cave’ and had a signing event Saturday afternoon at Fair Oaks Park Recreation Center. Above: Daniel signs a copy of his book for Amanda Lang, 13, daughter of Susan Lang of Powder Springs. <br> Staff/Todd Hull
Daniel Kumi, 12, son of Alex and Adelaide Kumi of Marietta, has published his third book, ‘Cats Cave’ and had a signing event Saturday afternoon at Fair Oaks Park Recreation Center. Above: Daniel signs a copy of his book for Amanda Lang, 13, daughter of Susan Lang of Powder Springs.
Staff/Todd Hull
slideshow
Ajoke Akinsey, 12, daughter of Teresa Akinsey of Marietta, raises her hand to ask Daniel a question.
Ajoke Akinsey, 12, daughter of Teresa Akinsey of Marietta, raises her hand to ask Daniel a question.
slideshow
MARIETTA — A 12-year-old Marietta Middle School student keeps getting into all kinds of trouble, except the perilous situations are stories created in his head and transcribed into books.

Daniel Kumi started writing short stories when he was six years old, and has published two collections: “Daniel’s Tales” in 2009 and “Tor and Other Stories” in 2011.

Kumi’s third book, “Cats Cave,” is a long-form, 150-page story, which is the first of a trilogy set in a place where fantasy creatures come to life.

It took about a year to write “Cats Cave,” said Kumi, who has most of the second installment planned.

It was tougher to focus on one concept, and surprisingly the novella forced Kumi to create more characters, he said.

Another big change with the third book is focusing on a female heroine, instead of Kumi’s traditional male protagonists.

“Females have to have their time to have a story,” Kumi said.

But the main character, Julia White, has many friends that share qualities Kumi said he sees in himself, but are relatable for anyone.

This past summer, Kumi, who was born in Atlanta, had a chance to visit Ghana, where both of his parents, Alex and Adelaide Kumi, are from. Although Kumi said sometimes he considers himself to be an American author, at other times he is Ghanaian.

Kumi’s background might be the reason he locates so many of his tales in strange lands with unusual creatures.

In “Cats Cave,” the main character is welcomed by a unicorn and threatened by militarized frogs and toads.

Kumi said he enjoys spending time alone working on

his solo projects. But his solo projects. But those works are adventure stories where the subjects break into libraries with grappling hooks and escape the police in a makeshift hot air balloon.

“As a writer, you can open yourself into different worlds,” Kumi said.

Kumis said as he matures as a writer, he might venture into other genres.

Kumi signed copies of “Cats Cave” on Saturday afternoon for friends and fans at the Fair Oaks Park Recreation Center between Powder Springs Street and Austell Road.

One classmate, Sam Judd, 13, said he read Kumi’s first two short story collections and hopes the trilogy is similar.

“I am not a writer, but I love to read,” Judd said.

Although Judd said he typically enjoys more realistic stories, he read “Daniel’s Tales” because he knew the author.

“After realizing how good of a writer (Kumi) is, I started the others when they came out,” Judd said.

Judd said Kumi choosing a heroine for the newest book shows the young author’s maturity.

Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, and spam will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides