MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at desegregation, Republicans, Lockheed, a burglar, a rapist and the Olympics.
August 02, 2014 04:00 AM | 61235 views | 0 0 comments | 2241 2241 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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The Week of Oct. 3rd
by Damon_Poirier
September 30, 2013 10:20 AM | 636 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at an Austell shooting, Cobb’s courthouse, a Kennestone bomb scare and the Big Chicken.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Oct. 3, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a story about how rival teams from Marietta High School and the Georgia Military Academy (GMA) were expected to play football in Atlanta later that day. The GMA team was considered to be one of the best prep teams in Georgia.

Another story in that edition reported that nationally-known evangelist the Rev. Frank C. Wright was expected to arrive in Marietta that day and preach his first sermon at the Presbyterian Church. A large congregation was expected for the Sunday evening service. Several Acworth residents were to arrive on the 6:45 p.m. evening train, while several Atlanta and Smyrna residents were to take the trolley up to Marietta for the service.

Also that week, there was a story about a 25-year-old man who was shot and killed in an Austell store following a quarrel over a lost pipe. The victim was said to have drawn a pistol on his killer, a 24-year-old man, who then dodged behind the store owner and fired a shot with his own weapon. The fatal bullet struck the victim in the forehead. Claiming self-defense, the killer turned himself into the town marshal and was brought to Marietta to await trial.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Sept. 29, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal, Marietta mayoral candidate Barney Nunn proposed construction of a downtown tunnel on the south side of the city in case of traffic congestion on the Square. The candidate, who was opposed by City Councilman Howard Atherton Jr. in the race to succeed retiring Mayor Sam Welsch, included the proposal in an eight-point campaign platform.

The Cobb County Advisory Board was reported in the Tuesday, Oct. 1, 1963 paper as having turned down a request by the mayors of Cobb’s six cities to hold a referendum on a site for a new courthouse. In connection with the mayors’ proposal, the board tabled a request by Varner-Meek Inc., to buy a multi-acre tract of land on the Four Lane (U.S. Highway 41) for $1. The development corporation asked the county to take possession of the site, known as Government Square, because it was costing them $1,000 a month to hold the property.

It was reported in the Thursday, Oct. 3, 1963 paper that police were searching for a man believed to be a suspect in the Kennestone Hospital bomb scare. The man, who was seen in a basement corridor of the hospital, asked a nurse about 7:30 p.m. the night before if there had been a bomb scare at the hospital. At the time of the threat, there were 312 patients in the hospital with 34 of them newborn babies. While no patients were evacuated, all visitors were asked to leave. The call was the third bomb scare in Marietta that week.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, Sept. 27, 1993 MDJ it was reported that statistics compiled by the Metropolitan Atlanta Crime Commission, a privately-financed, non-profit agency based in Atlanta, showed that Cobb County crimes from 1968 to 1992 had dipped to a five-year low. According to the study, crime rates dropped an average of six percent throughout the metro area in 1992, with the sharpest declines seen in Cobb, Douglas and Gwinnett counties.

A Cobb-based Air National Guard jet fighter wing was reported in the Tuesday, Sept. 28, 1993 paper as facing either being transferred to Robins Air Force Base near Macon or being disbanded, according to U.S. Sen. Sam Nunn (D-Perry). The Air Force wanted to take away the 1,300-member wing’s 18 F-15 jet fighters at Dobbins Air Reserve Base and replace them with eight B-1B intercontinental bombers.

Another story that day reported that Marietta’s most famous landmark, the Big Chicken was to be dismantled. The 30-year-old bird like the fabled phoenix was going to rise from its demise and sit atop a new Kentucky Fried Chicken restaurant. A spokesman for the Louisville, Ky.-based chain said rebuilding the restaurant and the 56-foot chicken would take about 90 days weather permitting.

In the Friday, Oct. 1, 1993 paper it was reported that a Kennesaw man who walked out of the Cobb courthouse before a jury convicted him of murder was arrested without incident in Ashville, Ala. An FBI agent and an Alabama police officer found and then arrested the man after going door to door in an Ashville neighborhood where the fugitive’s Marietta girlfriend had relatives. The 24-year-old man had been free to come and go as he pleased during the Cobb Superior Court proceedings after posting bail. Throughout the trial, he had remained in court. But, after the jury began deliberating, he left the courtroom saying he wanted to go smoke a cigarette. When jurors returned with a question for the court, it was discovered that the man had disappeared.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Sept. 26
by Damon_Poirier
September 23, 2013 10:18 AM | 758 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a Civil War signal officer’s visit, a new C-130 Hercules, the reactivation of the Phillips Legion, Newt Gingrich, former Gov. Lester Maddox and Fred Tokars.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Sept. 26, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the entire front page was once again taken up by the same ad for Marietta clothier T.W. Read that appeared the week before.

Another story in that edition reported that Lt. George C. Rounds, a signal officer for Gen. William T. Sherman during the last of the Civil War, came to Marietta with P.P. Hurlbut of Atlanta to demonstrate on Kennesaw Mountain the use of signal flags – which were the same ones used 50 years earlier.

50 years ago …

In the Friday, Sept. 20, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that a new version of the famed Air Force C-130 Hercules transport would be capable of retrieving astronauts, wherever they landed on the Earth’s surface. Designated the HC-130H, the configuration was selected by the Air Force because it met the requirements for Air Rescue Service missions.

Sen. Herman E. Talmadge was reported in the Sunday, Sept. 22, 1963 paper as voicing his opposition to the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty and said that he would vote against its ratification. Sen. Talmadge was at first inclined to support the treaty, but he reached the conclusion that the military gamble was too great and that it was too great a threat to national security.

Also that day, it was reported that three Georgia Tech students were caught after a brief tryout of giant earth moving equipment at the Interstate 75 construction area in south Cobb.

The Ward 6 Marietta City Council race between D.H. Holmes, a black funeral director, and Frank Ayers, a white man, was reported in the Monday, Sept. 23, 1963 paper as continuing to stir brisk voter registration as the deadline drew near.

In the Tuesday, Sept. 24, 1963 paper, it was reported that the Phillips Legion, one of the most colorful Georgia units in the Civil War, was reactivated by Gov. Carl Sanders with the commissioning of 18 Cobb County residents as officers. The Legion, commanded by Cobb Commissioner Herbert McCollum, would plan and direct the 1964 centennial observance of the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain.

The Marietta Center of the University of Georgia, hit by mounting enrollment for fall classes, was reported in the Wednesday, Sept. 25, 1963 paper as having overflowed into the Sunday School classrooms of a nearby church and officials were still searching for more space. Dr. Archie Rushton, the center’s director, said a total of 1,125 students had registered for fall courses as compared to only 750 in 1962 and that the anticipated fall registration was only 900 students.

20 years ago …

Dr. Timothy Mescon, dean of Kennesaw State College’s business school, said in the Monday, Sept. 20, 1993 MDJ that he now wished the school had never agreed to offer the Renewing American Civilization course that he teaches jointly with Republican Congressman Newt Gingrich. The college and Rep. Gingrich had come under heavy fire over the course, which some believed was a bully pulpit that Gingrich used to spread a conservative agenda.

Cobb school officials were reported in the Tuesday, Sept. 21, 1993 paper as having to close Nash Middle School in Smyrna after it was “trashed” by vandals, who broke windows, smashed equipment and spray-painted walls throughout the campus.

In the Wednesday, Sept. 22, 1993 paper, it was reported that former Gov. Lester Maddox won a five-year battle to rezone his 1.3-acre tract on Johnson Ferry Road, with Cobb commissioners unanimously approving a commercial classification that would allow a wide range of uses. The residential property was long ago zoned office-institutional, but used primarily as the residence of Gov. Maddox and his wife, Virginia. It had been considered a bulwark against retail and commercial encroachment into neighborhoods off Johnson Ferry and directly behind his home.

A federal judge was reported in the Thursday, Sept. 23, 1993 paper as dismissing a subpoena by lawyers for Fred Tokars that was asking for all the files collected by lawyers for Eddie Lawrence, who had pleaded guilty to the Nov. 29, 1992 murder of Tokars’ wife, Sara. U.S. District Court Judge Orinda Evans did, however, allow Atlanta lawyer Jerry Froelich to subpoena either Ron Hunton or Pat Banks, the two Cobb detectives who investigated the Cobb murder case.

In an attempt to keep a jet fighter wing in Marietta, it was reported in the Saturday, Sept. 25, 1993 paper that U.S. Rep. George “Buddy” Darden (D-Marietta) had tacked an amendment onto the House Appropriations Committee’s fiscal 1994 defense budget bill that would block its relocation to central Georgia. The legislation, which passed the committee earlier in the week and was expected to pass the full House intact, would prohibit the use of Defense Department or Air Force funds for relocation of the 1,300-member 116th Tactical Fighter Wing from Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Marietta to Robins Air Force Base near Macon.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Sept. 19th
by Damon_Poirier
September 19, 2013 12:05 PM | 707 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
 This week’s Time Capsule looks at a well rescue, desegregation, peace between Israel and the PLO, Lockheed and the 1848 House.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Sept. 19, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the entire front page was taken up by an ad for Marietta clothier T.W. Read advertising new suits and overcoats for men and Norfolk jackets for women, featuring Hart Schaffner & Marx clothes.

Another story in that edition reported that a young woman was found in a 40-foot well at her great aunt’s house in the Lost Mountain area the Sunday before. A man at the home heard her cries for help and quickly telephoned neighbors who pulled her out of four feet of water at the bottom of the well by a rope tied around her body. Dressed in her night clothes, the woman apparently fell in because the slide door over the top of the well was only half closed.

Also that week, the August cattle tick report was released. The report stated that the total herds and farms under local quarantine were 95 and the number of cattle was 622.

50 years ago …

In the Friday, Sept. 13, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that a group of blacks had petitioned the Marietta Board of Education to desegregate city schools. An 11-member delegation appeared before the school board the night before and asked for immediate action.

The U.S. Bureau of Public Roads revealed plans in the Sunday, Sept. 15, 1963 paper that would take a new look at proposed routes for a series of multi-lane connector roads planned for the Marietta, Elizabeth and Fair Oaks areas. Taken at the request of the State Highway Department, the move was the result of vigorous protests lodged by residents of Kennesaw Avenue who said a portion of the system scheduled to run up their street should be re-routed.

Another story that day reported the possibility of a black candidate entering the Marietta Ward 6 City Council race in the October city elections. D.H. Holmes, a black funeral home director, said he was being urged to seek the post of outgoing councilman C.E. Crissey.

In the Wednesday, Sept. 18, 1963 paper it was reported that Brig. Gen. George Wilson of Dobbins Air Force Base said a new Defense Department ruling that forbid military units from participating in events where audiences or facilities are segregated was not expected to have a local impact.

Federal, state and county law enforcement officers were reported in the Thursday, Sept. 19, 1963 paper as sorting through clues in Fair Oaks after a burglary crew successfully pulled off a $2,500 safe robbery during the night before.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, Sept. 14, 1993 paper, it was reported that several religious leaders and county residents saw the landmark peace agreement between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), signed the night before, as the first step on a long road to peace in the Middle East. The televised event showed the 3,000 onlookers – including former Presidents Jimmy Carter and George H. W. Bush – closing the signing ceremony in Washington, D.C. with a standing ovation.

Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co. was reported in the Wednesday, Sept. 16, 1993 paper as having received both full funding in fiscal year 1994 for the F-22 Advanced Tactical Fighter and a provision that would keep final assembly of the plane at the South Cobb Drive plant. The House Appropriations Defense Subcommittee recommended spending $2.25 billion for the F-22.

Another story that day reported that components for the P-3 Orion to be built by Lockheed in Marietta represented the two largest shipments ever to arrive in the seaport of Savannah. The first two shipments of parts arrived over the weekend in separate ships that docked at Georgia Ports Authority’s Garden City Terminal. The larger of the two – a crate holding the wings for the first Cobb-built submarine hunter – was secured to a special CSX Railroad car for the trip to the plant, while the second shipment was delivered by a flatbed truck.

In an effort to get the Cobb Galleria Centre off to a good start, the convention center wined and dined The American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) with $150,000 last September. In the Friday, Sept. 17, 1993 paper, it was reported that earlier in the week, the 12-member board of the Georgia Society of Associated Executives, affiliated with ASAE, voted to drop the tentative, three-day booking with the center in response to the county’s resolution criticizing gay lifestyles.

In the Saturday, Sept. 18, 1993 paper it was reported that the water oak behind the 1848 House restaurant in Marietta – which had survived the Civil War skirmish between Gen. William T. Sherman’s Union troops and retreating Confederates almost 130 years ago – fell from age and wet rot. The tree toppled during an afternoon storm, but missed the 143-year-old Greek Revival-style plantation house that it shaded at the corner of South Cobb Drive and Pearl Street.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Sept. 12th
by Damon_Poirier
September 13, 2013 01:15 PM | 725 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
This week’s Time Capsule looks at a jail escape, Lockheed’s annexation, a Marietta mountain lion, Newt Gingrich’s Renewing American Civilization course and Julia Roberts.
 
100 years ago …
 
In Friday, Sept. 12, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a story about how the First National Bank of Marietta was designated an active depositary of the U.S. government. The bank, which had been an inactive depositary for about eight years, would now pay all government checks and was authorized to accept government money deposits.
 
Another story in that edition reported that the Boy Scouts of Marietta met at the home of their scout master and held memorial exercises in the memory of a scout who drowned in Joyner Pond in 1912.
 
50 years ago …
 
A possible jail escape from the Cobb County Jail was reported in the Friday, Sept. 6, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal as being foiled after a prisoner was disarmed of an assortment of crude weapons. Chief Deputy John Quarles said that he and Deputy Sheriff Jesse Cooper recovered a razor sharp knife, several pieces of a rusted hack saw blade, a nail file and a hypodermic needle hidden in the prisoner’s clothing after they brought him from his upstairs cell to a downstairs room where he thought he was going to be routinely questioned.
 
Marietta Councilman Howard Atherton Jr., was reported in the Sunday, Sept. 8, 1963 paper as having announced as a candidate for mayor in Marietta’s October general election.
 
In the Wednesday, Sept. 11, 1963 paper, it was reported that Marietta Mayor Sam Welsch said that the Georgia General Assembly might ask in January to approve legislation annexing the Lockheed-Georgia Company, Dobbins Air Force Base and the Naval Air Station into Marietta. Welsch said the move, which would increase city tax revenues by more than $185,000 a year, was cleared by the U.S. Department of Defense, Lockheed officials and Cobb County government leaders.
 
Welsch was also reported in the Thursday, Sept. 12, 1963 paper as having announced that he would not seek re-election. Citing the fact that the citizens of Marietta had elected him on five different occasions and that he held office 12 of the last 16 years, Welsch said, “The time has come for someone else to be elected mayor.”
 
Also that day, the Cobb County Board of Education adopted a firm four-point policy for determining if individual married students would be permitted to attend schools within the system. The action was taken after Superintendent Jasper Griffin told the Cobb board that the system was in danger of “becoming a dumping ground” for married students excluded by other systems.
 
20 years ago …
 
In the Tuesday, Sept. 7, 1993 MDJ, it was reported that Marietta officials were investigating claims of a “large mountain lion” in Wildwood Park, adjacent to Life Chiropractic College at Barclay Circle and South Cobb Drive. An unidentified woman claimed she was chased by a large wildcat while visiting the park. Marietta Police checked several trails, but could not find the animal. However, they did “observe several large paw prints in the moist soil.”
 
Also that day, U.S. Rep. Newt Gingrich was reported as saying that he did not plan to back down from his commitment to teach an ideological course at Kennesaw State College in the fall, despite concerns of university system directors over alleged connections between fund-raising efforts for the course and a Republican PAC the congressman chaired. Later in the week, on Thursday, Sept. 9, 1993, it was reported that Gingrich’s special topics course – Renewing American Civilization – was back on track. KSC President Dr. Betty Siegel said in a prepared statement that the controversy would not halt the project, which was scheduled to begin Sept. 18, 1993.
 
Actress and Smyrna native Julia Roberts was reported in the Friday, Sept. 10, 1993 paper as being on the cover of the 10th anniversary special issue of “Vanity Fair.” Roberts said in the magazine that her new husband, country singer Lyle Lovett, reminded her of her one-time fantasy man, Abraham Lincoln.
 
In the Saturday, Sept. 11, 1993 paper, it was reported that a citizens’ committee recommended that the controversial East-West Connector be constructed along the original 4.9-mile route with a northern bypass around the Concord Covered Bridge area. The group stunned many in the audience at the South Cobb Government Center with a recommendation that access be prohibited between Hicks and Fontaine roads, a three-mile stretch of the route. The surprise suggestion was expected to redefine the road as a limited-access freeway and quiet widespread criticism that the route was intended to be little more than a developmental highway.
 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Sept. 5th
by Damon_Poirier
September 06, 2013 01:00 PM | 748 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
This week Time Capsule looks at a monument to Mary Phagan, the un-incorporation of the Elizabeth community, Kennesaw’s curfew and Fred Tokars’ not guilty verdict.
 
100 years ago …
 
In Friday, Sept. 5, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the entire front page was taken up with an exact reproduction of the Commission Government Bill that was to be submitted to Marietta voters on Nov. 11, 1913. The bill would repeal the acts creating Boards of Lights, Waterworks and Sewerage to create a new charter and government for the City of Marietta under a Board of Commissioners. The bill was passed through the last session of the Legislature and signed on Aug. 20 by Gov. John M. Slaton.
 
Another story in that edition reported that a meeting of the Marietta Camp 763 of the United Confederate Veterans unanimously adopted a resolution to contribute money from the camp treasury to fund the building of a monument to the memory of Marietta’s murdered “Little” Mary Phagan. The story talked about raising a white marble shaft in memory of the girl’s nobility and purity. It also mentioned a Dalton Citizen writer expressing a desire to see the “unfortunate child reproduced in marble in her agony.” But, the Journal and Courier author wrote that “… we would prefer to see her in beauty and happiness, if a statue is made to stand over her grave in our Marietta cemetery. The awful story of her death needs no marble to keep it in the memories of the living.”
 
50 years ago …
 
The Marietta Housing Authority’s purchase of an 80-acre tract of land northwest of the city for development as a housing subdivision for blacks was reported as upheld by Cobb Superior Court Judge James T. Manning in the Friday, Aug. 30, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal. In a companion decision, Judge Manning ruled that an 1883 act of the General Assembly incorporating the Town of Elizabeth was invalid and ineffective. The decision was handed down after two days of testimony in the cases.
 
In the Sunday, Sept. 1, 1963 paper, there was a front page aerial photograph showing construction progress on Interstate 75 and the Atlanta Perimeter Highway in Cobb County over the Chattahoochee River where the two highways met in a huge interchange. 
 
Cobb County’s 1963 property tax rate was reported in the Tuesday, Sept. 2, 1963 paper as being officially set at 35.75 mills. The new charge was more than 36 percent lower than the 1962 rate.
 
The Kennesaw City Council was reported in the Wednesday, Sept. 4, 1963 paper as unanimously passing a new city curfew ordinance that was designed to end an “undeclared war” raging between city officials and Kennesaw teens. The action, which forced all minors off city streets after 11 p.m., came after two weeks of complaints from city residents about “gangs of roving teenagers,” shouting profanity and destroying public property.
 
20 years ago …
 
In the Tuesday, Aug. 31, 1993 MDJ, despite a call from local gay activists urging them to honor a boycott of Cobb County, the Georgia Special Olympics officials selected the county as the site for their 1994 Winter Games.
 
Also that day, Fred Tokars was reported as pleading not guilty in U.S. Magistrate Court in Atlanta to federal charges that he conspired to kill his wife in order to protect the interests of a money-laundering operation that he allegedly helped build. During the brief arraignment before Judge William L. Harper, the former east Cobb resident declined to have federal prosecutors publicly read charges contained in a 16-count indictment. Tokars, looking disheveled while wearing a suit and tie, listened as Assistant U.S. Attorney Wilmer “Buddy” Parker III recommended that Judge Harper keep him in federal custody without bail.
 
In the MDJ’s front page Opinion Poll results in the Wednesday, Sept. 1, 1993 paper, a majority of Cobb residents were reported as believing the county commission’s resolution condemning the gay lifestyle had hurt the community’s image, although they agreed with the decision to cancel subsidies to the arts.
 
Another story that day, reported U.S. Rep. Newt Gingrich, who recently returned from a trip to the Balkans and Mediterranean area, said he would recommend that President Bill Clinton authorize attacks against nuclear weapon facilities in Iran and North Korea. The east Cobb Republican also was expected to ask President Clinton to send up to 30,000 U.S. troops to the violence-torn Balkans as part of a 90,000 member NATO force.
 
In the Thursday, Sept. 2, 1993 paper, there was a story about how three years after the Blair Aluminum Furniture Co. closed its historic but run-down factory, an Atlanta developer had unveiled plans to turn it into an $11 million office park. The proposed three-phase development centered around renovating and re-using the five buildings on 7½ acres overlooking North Marietta Parkway for a 126,250 square foot office park with the added possibility of specialty shops and a restaurant.
 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Aug. 29th
by Damon_Poirier
August 29, 2013 11:35 AM | 674 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week Time Capsule looks at Leo Frank’s guilty verdict, integration, I-75 contracts, Marietta’s Pony League champs, more fallout on Cobb’s anti-gay resolution and Fred Tokars’ murder charge indictment.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Aug. 29, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a story reporting that Leo M. Frank was found guilty of murdering Mary Phagan of Marietta and sentenced to hang on Oct. 10 by Judge L.S. Roan. The story reported that 4,000 people were in demonstration around the court house when the verdict was announced.

Another story in that edition reported that a six-year-old girl, who lived eight miles from Marietta, choked to death on a handful of green peas.

50 years ago …

Gov. Carl Sanders said in the Sunday, Aug. 25, 1963 paper that he would “vigorously oppose” any attempt by the federal government to force preferential hiring of blacks in state agencies. The governor’s comment followed an announcement that the federal government for 12 months had been quietly seeking “voluntary” integration of several state departments which received federal grants.

In the Wednesday, Aug. 27, 1963 paper, there was a story about a cost of living increase of three cents per hour, effective Sept. 14 and affecting roughly 13,000 Lockheed-Georgia Company hourly paid employees. The increase was based on the July cost of living index which rose to 107.1, which was from the April index of 106.2.

Another story that day reported the State highway Department was expected to award contracts in October or November for another Cobb County section of Interstate Highway 75. The contacts were to include a portion of the multi-lane expressway between the Atlanta circumferential route and Marietta’s Roswell Street.

Marietta city officials were reported in the Thursday, Aug. 29, 1963 paper as busy planning a homecoming celebration for the world’s third ranked Pony League team. Mayor Sam Welsch’s office announced that the Marietta champs would be met by a police escort at the city limits and then taken to the police station where city officials and the Marietta High School band would officially greet the players.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, Aug. 23, 1993 MDJ, it was reported that the political debate over Cobb County’s anti-gay resolution boiled over into a religious one as homosexuals, sympathizers and a Christian coalition converged on the Marietta Square. With picnic baskets and rainbow-striped flags in hand, about 1,000 conservatively dressed and acting gays, lesbians and supporters gathered in Glover Park for a peaceful Queer Family Picnic. An hour after it begun, a group of county and city law enforcement politely ushered the gay rights crowd out of the park so 400 sign and Bible-toting Christians could hold their “praise rally.” Area ministers and evangelists during the rally preached love and acceptance while punctuating the sermons with hymns like “How Great Thou Art,” “He Is Lord,” and “A Mighty Fortress Is Our God.”

After almost two months of contentious and fiery debate, the Cobb Board of Commissioners was reported in the Wednesday, Aug. 25, 1993 paper as having voted unanimously to cut off all county funding that supported the arts. The vote came just two hours after more than 25 arts supporters made one final attempt to make the commission see things their way.

Fred Tokars was reported in the Friday, Aug. 27, 1993 paper as being indicted on murder, armed robbery and kidnapping charges relating to the highly publicized Nov. 29, 1992 shotgun slaying of his wife, Sara, in front of their two sons near their east Cobb home. Cobb grand jurors met for 90 minutes before returning the indictment. District Attorney Tom Charron also filed a notice in Cobb Superior Court saying that he would be seeking the death penalty against Tokars, a 40-year-old tax attorney and former Atlanta municipal judge. It was also reported that the day before, federal authorities unsealed an indictment charging Tokars and a former business associate with using interstate telephone lines to plot the kidnapping and murder of Tokars’ 39-year-old wife.

In the Saturday, Aug. 28, 1993 paper, it was reported that the Atlanta-based band, Good Medicine, played about three songs in 15 minutes of their Glover Park Concert Series show on the Marietta Square before walking off stage in protest of the Cobb commissioners’ decision to withdraw funding for all arts. The five-member Blue Grass band quickly packed their equipment and left the Square to the booing of a 400-member audience.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Aug. 22nd
by Damon_Poirier
August 22, 2013 10:00 AM | 717 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
This week Time Capsule looks at the death of Mary Phagan’s grandmother, tick eradication, Marietta schools bus service and fall out from the passing of Cobb’s anti-gay resolution.
 
100 years ago …
 
In Friday, Aug. 22, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story regarding the now famous murder of Marietta’s Mary Phagan and the trial of her accused killer, Leo M. Frank. The story reported how Anna Benton, the 73-year-old grandmother of Mary Phagan, had died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J.W. Coleman in Atlanta. Mrs. Benton had been in Atlanta to be present at Frank’s murder trial. On the second day of the trial, “grief and incessant worry over the death of her granddaughter” caused her to take to bed “from which she was never able to rise.”
 
Another front page story in that edition reported that tick eradication work in Cobb for July 1913 listed 96 herds and farms under local quarantine and the number of cattle at 395. The total number of original and re-inspections of herds quarantined and herds on farms free of ticks were 498 with the number of cattle at 2,462.
 
There was also a half-page ad on Page 2 of that edition on the sale of the A.P. McCravy Farm which was to be sold “before the Courthouse door” in Marietta on Sept. 2, 1913. The property, at Turner’s Crossing on the Marietta electric car line just two miles south of Marietta, had been subdivided into 18 tracts that averaged from 1 to 20 acres each. Fourteen of the lots fronted the W&A Railroad, the electric car line and the public road.
 
50 years ago …
 
The Cobb County Grand Jury was reported in the Friday, Aug. 16, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal as recommending charges be brought against the county unless an effort was made to remedy “deplorable” conditions at the jail. The 33-member body declared that it was “appalled” at the overcrowded, “unsanitary,” and poorly ventilated jail.
 
Also that day, it was reported that Elbert Cox, the Regional Director of the National Park Service, said new facilities for the Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield park would be completed by June 1964 – the 100th anniversary of the mountain’s role in the Civil War.
 
Iran and New Zealand were also reported that day as having become the seventh and eighth nations to put into air force service the Lockheed-Marietta built turboprop C-130 Hercules airlifters.
 
In the Monday, Aug. 19, 1963 paper, it was reported that Cobb hosted its first foreign athletic team, as far as records at the time showed. The Monterrey, Mexico Pony League All-Stars arrived in Marietta to participate in the Southern Division finals at Heck Memorial Field.
 
In the Wednesday, Aug. 21, 1963 paper, it was reported that there would be no bus service for Marietta City School children during the coming school year. A survey made earlier in the year showed that most Marietta parents were in favor of bus service, but city officials were informed that $50,000 was needed to purchase the bus fleet and operate them for one year.
 
20 years ago …
 
Newspaper editors in the 7th District were reported in the Monday, Aug. 16, 1993 MDJ as generally believing that Rep. George “Buddy” Darden’s vote for President Bill Clinton’s economic plan would hurt the Marietta Democrat’s chances for a sixth full term. However, they acknowledged that there had not been a wave of letters to the editor or calls to the papers condemning Darden’s vote, his second in favor of the combination of tax increases and budget cuts.
 
The executive committee of the Cobb County Community Relations Council in the Tuesday, Aug. 17, 1993 paper criticized the Cobb Commissioner’s recent anti-gay resolution, calling it “ill-advised” and “inappropriate” in a memorandum on the issue sent to the commission. The document was approved in a 15-minute meeting with only three of the five committee members attending.
 
In the Wednesday, Aug. 18, 1993 paper, a front page story reported that the local branch of a major corporation was expected to announce the cancellation of a scheduled one-day event at the Cobb Galleria Centre as a result of the Cobb Commission’s recent condemning of gay lifestyles. The event was expected to draw about 800 people and cost a total of $14,000, including catering.
 
To prevent clashes between a predominantly Christian group and a homosexual organization it was reported in the Thursday, Aug. 19, 1993 paper that police ordered them not to use the Marietta Square at the same time for their rallies on Sunday, Aug. 22. The Concerned Christians of Cobb and the Lesbian Avengers had both asked to start their rallies at 1 p.m., but Marietta police said the Avengers’ Queer Family Picnic would be held first and ordered the Concerned Christians of Cobb to put their gathering until 3:30 p.m. Police were gearing up to handle a crowd of about 400 people for both rallies. The Lesbian Avengers was a “direct action” group founded in New York City in 1992. The Concerned Citizens of Cobb was a newly formed, loose knit group with no firm membership and no affiliation with any particular churches.
 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Aug. 15th
by Damon_Poirier
August 13, 2013 03:30 PM | 741 views | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week Time Capsule looks at a train and buggy accident, the opening of Rich’s, nuclear weapons hitting Dobbins and Cobb commissioners adopting its anti-gay resolution.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Aug. 15, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about the robbery of the safe at the offices of the Wilkie-Butler Drug Co. The robbery happened after closing when burglars entered the store through the ice chute at the rear of the building. The $360 theft was determined to have been done by an expert since the combination lock was used to open the safe. It was also determined that the burglars removed the hinges of the safe in order to give the impression that an amateur had done the job.

Another front page story in that edition reported that a local 65-year-old man had died at a nearby sanitarium from injuries received when a northbound passenger train struck the buggy that he and another man were riding in. The pair, returning from a veteran’s reunion in Kennesaw, were struck at the Dobbs crossing just beyond Kennesaw Mountain. Both of the buggy’s horses were killed and dragged some distance. The surviving buggy rider suffered a broken arm below the elbow and severe bruises. Upon arrival at the sanitarium, the other man had such a badly broken arm that it required immediate amputation. It was also reported that his hip was “crushed to a pulp.”

50 years ago …

Shoppers were reported in the Sunday, Aug. 11, 1963 paper as being able to have their first look at the new Cobb County Center as Rich’s, one of 22 tenants in the 43-acre development, opened its doors. Rich’s was the largest department store in Cobb at the time. The Cobb County Center, located at South Cobb Drive at Pat Mell Road, was developed by Food Fair Properties and was expected to serve a market of 230,000 people. Features included a 4,000-space parking lot, a T-shaped mall with a Japanese Contemplation Garden and a 250-seat indoor auditorium.

In the Monday, Aug. 12, 1963 paper, it was reported that the Marietta City Council authorized condemnation proceedings to clear the way for the widening of Roswell Street east of the Four Lane Highway (U.S. Highway 41). With the State Highway Department facing a legal advertising deadline for contract letting the council voted in emergency session to condemn a five-foot easement in front of the East Marietta Shopping Center.

Lockheed-Georgia Company announced plans in the Tuesday, Aug. 13, 1963 paper to construct a $3 million multi-building research center on a 45-acre tract of land adjacent to its main plant in Marietta. President W. A. Pulver said grading work would begin about mid-October and construction of the first buildings in the initial group of research facilities would begin before Jan. 1, 1964. Pulver also said that those buildings would be occupied near the middle of 1964 and that the center would be completed by 1965.

On the front page of the Wednesday, Aug. 14, 1963 paper, the Marietta Daily Journal announced its first full processed color work in a two page advertisement for Rich’s on pages 4C and 5C of that paper. Spot color ads had appeared in the paper for years, but the Rich’s ad was the first four color work printed on the newspaper’s press.

“Nuclear weapons hit Dobbins” was the headline in the Thursday, Aug. 15, 1963 paper. Operation Swift Strike III, a massive war game played by the military pitted Blue forces against Red forces, was expected to close at the end of the week. During the games, the Blue’s air force had dropped make-believe nuclear weapons on the Red base of North Field and Dobbins Air Force Base in Marietta, crippling a large number of Red aircraft. It was the first time nuclear weapons had been used against airfields.

Also that day, it was reported that a 17½ foot tall granite monument would be dedicated in the memory of Georgia Confederate soldiers who died at the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain. Financed by funds allocated by Gov. Carl Sanders, the $8,500 monument was the first to be located at the National Battlefield Park in honor of Georgians who lost their lives there.

20 years ago …

In the Wednesday, Aug. 11, 1993 MDJ, it was reported that Cobb commissioners adopted two “community-value” resolutions – one condemning gay lifestyles and another toned-down version that endorsed traditional family values, but did not criticize homosexuality. During the marathon session, Christian activists rallied, ministers and laymen quoted scripture, lesbians and gay men expressed joy in their lifestyles, and arts and free speech advocates warned of impending lawsuits against the county government. No public comment was permitted as the board adopted the resolutions. However, 36 people, mostly in support, spoke on the proposed change to a companion issue that would be voted upon on Aug. 24 – an amendment to Cobb’s arts ordinance that would restrict public funding of arts programs to only those that supported community, family-oriented values.

Swelled by members of Roswell Street Baptist Church and Mount Bethel United Methodist Church, the overflow crowd of about 150 people assembled in Glover Park to witness the proceedings on televisions placed upon the park stage. Wearing yellow badges urging others to “Support Community Standards,” the crowd applauded the commission’s vote.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Aug. 8th
by Damon_Poirier
August 09, 2013 10:00 AM | 736 views | 0 0 comments | 13 13 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a train wreck, a Confederate monument, Lemon Street High School’s football stadium, moving the historic Lost Mountain Store and the proposed East-West Connector.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Aug. 8, 1913 edition of The Marietta Daily Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about a deadly train wreck at 2 a.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 6 when an L&N freight train running over the W&A railroad crashed into a 35 foot long and 40 foot deep washout at Noonday Creek that had been caused by rains on the night before. Five men died in the wreck. Only one body was recovered. The other four bodies were buried at the bottom of the washout under the locomotive and 14 cars. Water in the creek was reported as being 25 feet deep.

Another story in that week’s edition reported that M.L. McNeel of the McNeel Marble Co. had returned from a meeting with the Board of Trustees of Confederate Veterans in Florida, who had awarded the company the contract to erect a $24,000 monument in the memory of the Women of the Confederacy in Dignam Park in Jacksonville, Fla. The canopy designed monument, standing 50 feet tall, would be surmounted by a 13 foot bronze statue of a woman holding the furled Confederate flag. Underneath the canopy, there would be a bronze group, composed of a mother teaching her son and daughter about the history of the South.

50 years ago …

In the Friday, Aug. 2, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that property owners opposed to the construction of a black high school football field in northeast Marietta had appealed the court ruling that allowed the project to proceed. The action was expected to further hold up the efforts of the Marietta School Board to condemn a 3.5 acre tract of land at Fairground and Rigby streets for construction of Lemon Street High School’s football stadium.

Six rifle shots were reported in the Sunday, Aug. 4, 1963 paper as being fired into the Smyrna bedroom of a striking Atlantic Steel Company employee shortly after midnight the Friday before. The shots barely missed the head of the man who had just sat up in bed and was about to look out a window to see why his dogs were barking. Atlantic Steel Company in Atlanta had been struck by its union for several weeks.

Another story that day reported that within two to three months the Fulton County government was to begin emptying treated sewage into a tributary of the Chattahoochee River four-tenths of a mile above the intake of Cobb County’s water plant.

A professional car stripping operation in a Smyrna residential area was reported broken up in the Monday, Aug. 5, 1963 paper after a fire was started by a power saw being used to dismantle one of the two 1963 model vehicles in the basement.

Only two property owners were reported in the Tuesday, Aug. 6, 1963 paper as holding out in granting right-of-way for the widening of Roswell Street east of U.S. 41. The road was to be widened to four lanes from two lanes for nine-tenths of a mile distance from U.S. 41 and the fork of Roswell and Lower Roswell roads.

20 years ago …

A quick-thinking robber was reported in the Tuesday, Aug. 3, 1993 paper as posing as the clerk of the convenience store that he was robbing to turn away a customer, before taking an in-store video recorder that had taped the incident.

Another story that day reported that the county had approved a plan to move the historic Lost Mountain Store on Dallas Highway, which cleared the way for construction to begin on a proposed Publix grocery store and adjacent retail strip. George S. Morgan Developments had proposed moving the store, which was 20 feet above the surrounding grade level, in order to clean out soil contaminated by leaking gasoline tanks on the site.

In the Thursday, Aug. 5, 1993 paper reported that most members of a capacity crowd turned their backs on all six proposed routes for the beleaguered East-West Connector vowing that local politicians would not pit neighborhoods against each other to push the road past federal regulatory agencies. The public hearing drew an estimated 600 Cobb residents to Thompson Park on Nickajack Road, despite the location being off the beaten track, having a lack of parking and a meeting site perched on a steep, 40 foot incline.

Once considered by many to be the frontrunner, Cobb County was reported in the Saturday, Aug. 7, 1993 paper as not hosting the woman’s fast-pitch softball competition in the 1996 Olympics. The Atlanta Commission for the Olympic Games announced that it had selected Columbus over Cobb and eight other sites.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Aug. 1st
by Damon_Poirier
July 30, 2013 10:00 AM | 748 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week Time Capsule looks at Communism, anti-integration pickets, a Mayor’s lawsuit, the flooding Mississippi River and Cobb’s anti-gay resolution.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Aug. 1, 1913 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about Marietta’s new high school building having been completed and the keys turned over to the Board of Education. Built to the plans of architect J.R. MacEachern of Atlanta, the school’s lighting was reported as “almost perfect” and with “no dark corners or cloak rooms anywhere in the building.” During a recent inspection of the work, the Board reportedly found nothing to criticize and everything to commend.

Another story in that edition reported “the biggest event in Masonry” would be held in Powder Springs later that week as the Masonic lodges of Cobb County would meet for their 10th annual convention.

There was also a front page ad that week from The Gem Theatre announcing the screening of Robinson Crusoe, which according to the ad was “the greatest, most masterly three-reel film of the age.”

50 years ago …

A Smyrna police official was reported in the Friday, July 26, 1963 Marietta Daily Journal as having been arrested for embezzlement following the discovery of shortages in cash receipt funds. Mayor Jake Ables said that the officer had admitted to “misappropriation” of the less than $500 in traffic fine receipts.

In the Sunday, July 28, 1963 paper, it was reported that Juvenile Court Judge Conley Ingram was back from a trip to Russia. Ingram, noting that Cobb schools would offer a comparative course in Americanism vs. Communism that fall, said Americanism and loyalty should be taught to U.S. students as fervently as Communists preached their philosophy. Ingram, along with a delegation of Georgia citizens, toured cities in Russia, Poland and Hungary as well as West Berlin, Germany weeks earlier.

Also that day it was reported that anti-integration pickets were withdrawn from three Cobb restaurants after an agreement was reached with the management at two of the businesses. The Cobb County Citizens for Better Government, Inc. on July 13 started picketing the Davis Brothers’ cafeteria on the Four Lane Highway (U.S. Highway 41) in Marietta; the Chick, Chuck ‘n Shake drive-in at Roswell Road and the Four Lane – which was also operated by the Davis Brothers and sat on the site of the current day Big Chicken; and Johnny Reb’s Dixieland at Smyrna.

Another story that day reported a south-bound freight train struck and killed a young Mableton man shortly after he had left a restaurant where a fight had broken out. The man’s body was dragged some 350 feet by the Southern Railway’s Number 152 train. The scene of the accident was just a few yards from the point where the Floyd Road Bridge crossed the tracks in Mableton.

Marietta Mayor Sam Welsch was reported in the Monday, July 29, 1963 paper as having drawn up and filed a $100,000 lawsuit against Steve W. Brown, the editor of the monthly newsletter – “The Conservative Georgian,” in Cobb Superior Court. The suit alleged that Welsch had been defamed by the “Around Cobb County” article in the publication’s June 24 issue.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, July 26, 1993 MDJ, it was reported that U.S. Reps. George “Buddy” Darden (D-Marietta) and Newt Gingrich (R-East Cobb) supported President Bill Clinton’s $3 billion emergency aid package to states ravaged by the flooding Mississippi River. Rising waters along the swollen river and its tributaries had flooded homes in Missouri, Illinois, Kansas, Wisconsin, Iowa, South Dakota, Nebraska and Minnesota. Locally, Cobb County Manager David Hankerson was also expected to unveil to the Cobb County Commission details of a proposed comprehensive storm water management plan for the county.

The on-again, off-again resolution stating that Cobb commissioners should not endorse gay lifestyles in any of its policy decisions was reported in the Tuesday, July 27, 1993 paper as being back on the commission agenda. Eastern District Commissioner Gordon Wysong pushed the resolution along with a proposed ordinance change that would direct county funding for arts and cultural programs only to projects that supported “family-oriented, community values.” Cobb Commission Chairman Bill Byrne removed the resolution from the agenda the previous week at the behest of Commissioner Bill Cooper, who said it could be interpreted as “gay-bashing.” The night before the commission meeting, the resolution was removed from the agenda for a second time. Byrne said the commission was unable to agree on a definition of community standards, despite hours of debate amongst themselves.

Cobb Police and staff at Cobb Hospital and Medical Center on Austell Road were reported in the Thursday, July 29, 1993 paper as searching a newborn infant’s body which disappeared from the morgue. Hospital officials found the body missing when a funeral home came to pick up the girl’s remains. In the following day’s paper it was reported that missing newborn had apparently been cremated without the family’s consent.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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