MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at integration, Civil Rights, Lake Allatoona pollution and the Wonderbra.
August 23, 2014 04:00 AM | 66616 views | 0 0 comments | 2342 2342 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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March 25, 2014 The Week of March 27 no comments
March 18, 2014 The Week of March 20th no comments
March 14, 2014 The Week of March 13 no comments
March 10, 2014 The Week of March 6 no comments
March 03, 2014 The Week of Feb. 27 no comments
February 21, 2014 The Week of Feb. 20 no comments
February 07, 2014 The Week of Feb. 6 no comments
January 23, 2014 The Week of Jan. 23 no comments
January 16, 2014 The Week of Jan. 16 no comments
January 10, 2014 The Week of Jan. 9 no comments
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The Week of Jan. 23
by Damon_Poirier
January 23, 2014 10:20 AM | 601 views | 0 0 comments | 18 18 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
This week’s Time Capsule looks at a train robbery, a restaurant raid, a bomb threat and a road block.
 
100 years ago …
 
In Friday, Jan. 23, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page reported a train robbery that happened on the previous Friday night aboard the N.C. and St. L. fast passenger train as it passed southward between Vinings and Bolton. Just after the train passed Vinings, the Pullman car conductor started through the train to make his report when he was confronted at the rear car door by a masked man with a black pistol. The robber ordered the passengers to the front of the car, made them give up their purses and took about $300. The robber then pulled the emergency brake cord, waited for the train to slow and then swung off the rear platform. The conductor rushed through the train and found a Fulton County policeman who was the only armed person aboard. Rushing to the rear platform, the officer fired at the robber but missed him in the dark.
 
Also that week there was a story about the United Daughters of the Confederacy celebrating the birthday of Robert E. Lee at the residence of Mrs. S.A. Anderson. A dozen Confederate veterans were present and during the social hour after the ladies program they talked about wartime scenes and memories. W.J. Manning was reported as saying that he had visited the Confederate museum in Richmond on several occasions and talked about the importance of preserving the war relics. He also spoke about a boyish Confederate soldier named Kirkland, who during a battle in freezing weather took five canteens of water to wounded Federals who were suffering from thirst and the cold.
 
50 years ago …
 
In the Friday, Jan. 17, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal, Cobb Rep. Bill Teague said he was introducing a bill in the General Assembly that would repeal Georgia’s controversial “Face Your Accuser Law.” The law had been under constant fire from grand juries and other groups for years. It provided that no state or county official could be indicated of wrong doing charges without first having an opportunity to appear before the grand jury with counsel and defense witnesses.
 
Marietta’s new city administration was reported in the Sunday, Jan. 19, 1964 paper as eying installation of electronic data processing equipment to speed up and cut costs of billing and accounting in City Hall and the city’s various government related agencies.
 
A third-grade student at the Pine Forest School was reported in the Monday, Jan. 20, 1964 paper as being struck by a car on Clay Street as he and his sister were on their way to school. The eight-year old boy was hospitalized with arm and rib fractures after he darted into the street and was hit by the car.
 
In the Tuesday, Jan. 21, 1964 paper it was reported that the State Health Department had agreed to make funds available in July for the construction of a new 150-bed hospital in Cobb County.
 
Also that day, it was reported that Sheriff’s deputies raided the recently opened Old Lamp Lighter Restaurant on the South 4-Lane (U.S. Highway 41) and arrested a woman for possessing an illegal amount of tax-paid whiskey and selling mixed drinks. Sheriff Kermit C. Sanders said that he had numerous complaints about mixed drinks being sold on the premises and the most recent ones were from local ministers.
 
A performance of “Who’s Been Sleeping In My Bed” was reported in the Wednesday, Jan. 22, 1964 paper as having halted for about 30 minutes as police and firemen searched the Cobb Theater for a non-existent bomb. B.A. Eddison, manager of the theater, told police a man called and said there was a bomb in the movie house around 8 p.m. and that it would explode in 15 minutes. Eddison initially ignored the call, but the man called back and asked him if he had searched the theater yet.
 
Cobb County, Marietta and Douglasville Police were reported in the Thursday, Jan. 23, 1964 paper as having teamed up to capture three men wanted for armed robbery in Alabama. Cobb Police received a call at 1 a.m. that the three suspects were traveling towards Cobb from Cressville, Ala. At 1:30 a.m., they received a call from a Dallas Police officer who was following them but afraid to stop the car. Cobb Police ordered a road block on Dallas Highway and turned a truck across the road stopping traffic.
 
20 years ago …
 
In the Tuesday, Jan. 18, 1994 MDJ a predicted ice storm waited until mid-morning to hit the county, but freezing rain and sleet quickly slicked roads that caused hundreds of wrecks. The icy precipitation, part of a storm that moved from Texas to Georgia during the night, caused treacherous driving conditions that paralyzed some areas of north Georgia. Police said it might take days to determine the number of accidents that happened during the storm. The following day, the Wednesday, Jan. 19 paper, reported that 177 accidents happened during the icy spell while an Arctic front blasted into the county and the wind chill dropped to -15 degrees. The next day, the Thursday, Jan. 20 paper, reported that a third of Cobb County’s school buses stalled in the cold.
 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Jan. 16
by Damon_Poirier
January 16, 2014 10:40 AM | 662 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
This week’s Time Capsule looks at a Kennesaw shooting, the Atherton’s Drug Store explosion investigation and high school dropouts losing driver’s licenses.
 
100 years ago …
 
In the Friday, Jan. 16, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a story about B.A. Fite, the receiver of the defunct Kennesaw Bank, being arrested on charges of having fired several shots into the home of W.P. Whitaker in Kennesaw. The shooting was reported as following a feud between the stockholders of the defunct bank and its former officers.
 
Five rounds were fired into the home. The first two were fired through a window and the last three through a panel of glass in the front door where they lodged in the wall at the end of a hall. Whitaker was in Atlanta on business at the time of the shooting, but his wife and two small children were in the house.
 
Before Whitaker returned home, after being reached by his wife via telephone, the Sheriff’s office in Marietta had been notified. Deputy George M. Hicks and his bloodhounds tracked a trail immediately to the home of Fite, which was two blocks from Whitaker’s home. Deputy Hicks wanting to be sure he had the right man, ran the bloodhounds along the trail a second time and they lead him to Fite’s door a second time.
 
50 years ago …
 
In the Friday, Jan. 10, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal there was a story about the Marietta Board of Education awarding a $208,000 contract to Marietta Construction Company for building of a new addition at Lemon Street High School. School Superintendent Henry Kemp said construction of the addition was to be placed on the site of the school’s present football field and financed jointly by the Marietta and Cobb Boards of Education.
 
Investigators were reported in the Sunday, Jan. 12, 1964 paper as having completed their often delayed probe into the cause of the explosion of the Atherton’s Drug Store that happened on Oct. 31. Fire Chief Howard Schaeffer said an official announcement of the cause would be given as soon as the individual agencies were able to compile and confer on their findings.
 
The investigation proceeded rapidly until it was feared that heavy drilling work needed by the probe would cause the building to collapse. It also took a little over three weeks to dismantle the heavily damaged structure and then weather deteriorated into rain, sleet and snow which halted the investigation.
 
For a day by day look at news coverage following the gas explosion at Atherton’s Drug Store, check out The Atherton's Drug Store Explosion column.
 
Cobb Sen. Ed Kendrick announced in the Tuesday, Jan. 14, 1964 paper that he was co-sponsoring legislation in the General Assembly that would make school dropouts lose their driver’s licenses. The measure was scheduled for introduction in the State Senate by Kendrick and Sen. Zell Miller and would deny licenses to people of high school age if they voluntarily quit school. Kendrick said he and Miller were not only concerned about the dropout problem, but “we want somebody who is educated driving that hunk of machinery on the road.”
 
Also that day, City Planner Leo LaForge began anew a once thwarted survey to determine the necessary steps for making Marietta’s central business district more attractive to shoppers. The survey was first initiated in the fall of 1963, but fell through when downtown merchants and businessmen failed to reply to a questionnaire mailed to them by LaForge. The survey was part of a $51,000 urban development study approved for the city in June by the federal government’s Housing and Home Finance Agency.
 
20 years ago …
 
In the Monday, Jan. 10, 1994 MDJ it was reported that State Rep. Jack Vaughn, R-west Cobb, who underwent successful surgery for brain cancer three years earlier, was to undergo surgery again after a reoccurrence of the tumor. Rep. Vaughn, then-32, said that he admitted himself to Emory University Hospital after suffering what he thought was “sinus-related headaches for about two weeks.” Two days later, Tuesday, Jan. 12, 1994, it was reported that Rep. Vaughn’s neurosurgeon, Dr. Suzie Tindall, called the operation a success. Rep. Vaughn said his illness would not change his plans to run for a fourth two-year term in the Legislature.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of Jan. 9
by Damon_Poirier
January 10, 2014 05:15 PM | 649 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a convict cages, a car theft with tin foil, high acid levels and gun licensing fees.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Jan. 9, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the entire front page was taken up by an advertisement from T.W. Read’s that was headlined with “At last the mystery is solved! The truth is known. The world revolves and the seeds are sown, and now to reap the Harvest, yes! The greatest Harvest this country has ever known by attending T.W. Read’s Big Sale.” Some sale items were 3-cent Ladies’ and Misses’ hose, 1-cent Ladies’ handkerchiefs, 3-cent Men’s hose and 2-cent Men’s handkerchiefs.

Also that week it was reported that the county commissioners met in regular session and decided to advertise for bids in the construction of five steel cages to confine convicts at night. The cages were to be on wheels and could be taken from point to point. Each cage was to have an 18-man capacity.

Another story reported that E.G. Hill was elected mayor of Kennesaw and the K.L. Griffin, B.H. Hill, George R. Skelton and J.T. Chalker were elected city councilmen.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Jan. 5, 1964 edition of the Marietta Daily Journal reported that a 65-year-old Cobb man was charged with illegal receipt of $230 in old age pension funds. Solicitor Luther Hames, who referred the case to the Cobb Grand Jury, said that he believed that it was the first case of its kind reported to prosecutors in Georgia.

Also reported that day was the dedication of the Cobb-Marietta Library at 201 Atlanta Street. The library occupied the old post office building, acquired by the Cobb County-Marietta Public Library Board after the new Marietta Post Office was built on Lawrence Street.

A 17-year-old Marietta boy was reported in the Monday, Jan. 6, 1964 paper as admitting that he did not have much to do and couldn’t find a job, so he stole an automobile with a piece of tin foil. The boy told deputies that he left home and walked down to Kennestone Hospital where he spotted the car. He took the inner lining of tin foil from a pack of cigarettes and “hot wired” the car. The boy was apprehended on his way home with the car by deputies.

Another story that day reported Cobb Superior Court would convene on Jan. 20 and had 700 cases on the docket, including a murder charge against a black woman who was accused of fatally shooting her husband, whom she said had threatened her with a piece of pipe. There were also more than 120 cases to be heard concerning bad checks.

Drug executive Howard Atherton Jr. was reported in the Tuesday, Jan. 7, 1964 paper as having took office of mayor with a gloomy report to new Marietta councilmen and citizens that the outgoing administration had committed the city to $63,000 deficit by July 1.

20 years ago …

Cobb water officials were reported in the Wednesday, Jan. 5, 1994 MDJ as saying that they believed an Austell chemical company was responsible for high acid levels in a nearby tributary. The pH levels caused by high chemical concentrations were found in two drainage areas below C&S Chemicals off Bankhead Highway. The low pH levels, which indicated high acidity, were capable of causing the death of some aquatic life and human skin irritation. Colin Decker, the industrial monitoring supervisor with the Cobb Water System, said that the county was “pretty sure” that C&S Chemicals were responsible for the pollution.

U.S. Rep. Newt Gingrich, R-east Cobb, was reported in the Thursday, Jan. 6, 1994 paper as siding with Cobb gun dealers who stridently objected to a federal proposal to increase licensing fees by 6,000 percent. U.S. Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen said he would like to see the licensing fee required to deal guns raised to $600 a year from $10.

In the Friday, Jan. 7, 1994 paper it was reported that a 19-year-old Cobb restaurant worker was in serious condition at Kennestone Hospital, where she was being treated for bacterial meningitis, the first reported case in Georgia in 1994.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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