MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at robberies, wrecks, an assault, McCollum Airport and handbills.
December 27, 2014 04:00 AM | 103772 views | 0 0 comments | 2797 2797 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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The Week of August 7
by Damon_Poirier
August 09, 2014 04:00 AM | 755 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at WWI, moonshine, Kennestone Hospital and a sniper.

100 years ago …

In Friday, Aug. 7, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page article with the headline of “WAR!!” The story began with how “almost the whole of Europe has become involved in war following the assassination of the Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife, of Austria, while on a visit to Serbia several weeks ago.”

Archduke Ferdinand’s assassination in Sarajevo, Serbia precipitated Austria-Hungary’s declaration of war against Serbia, which caused the Central Powers – which were Germany and Austria-Hungary, and the World War I Allies to declare war on each other and started World War I.

At the time of the article, German troops had invaded France and Belgium. The invasion of Belgium, which was neutral, drew England into the fight alongside Russia and France. Both naval and land battles were being reported from various sources, but at the time, the only authentic report of any battle on the sea was from Algiers and stated the destruction of the German cruiser Panther and the capture of the German cruisers Goeben and Breslan.

Another front page story that week reported that Gov. John M. Slaton spoke to the voters of Cobb County at the courthouse after being introduced by Lindley W. Camp. Gov. Slaton spoke on the Tax Equalization law and not once in the speech did he refer to either of his opponents or his race for the U.S. Senate.

It was also reported on the front page of that edition that a six-year-old girl was struck and killed by an automobile after she ran out from behind a wagon near the sanitarium in Smyrna.

50 years ago …

An auto accident in the driving rain was reported in the Sunday, Aug. 2, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as yielding 154 gallons of moonshine to the Marietta Police. Officers stopped a car for a traffic light at Clay Street and the Four Lane, now known as Highway 41, and promptly was rammed from the rear by another car. The impact sent the trunk lid flying up to reveal the whiskey in half-gallon jars. The whiskey car sped from the scene was found abandoned at a nearby drive-in restaurant.

A $400,000 building to house the Georgia Air National Guard’s 129th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron was reported in the Tuesday, Aug. 4, 1964 paper as being planned for 15 acres of land near the county-owned McCollum Airport. The Advisory Board approved giving the land to the Guard at its last meeting. The Guard expected to have 21 full-time employees with a yearly payroll of nearly $250,000 at the site and have the unit train 125 reservists.

Another story that day reported that all streets torn up for installation of the new sanitary sewer system in the East Marietta-Red Oak Park area would be ready for repaving by Aug. 20. M.C. Bishop of the B&B Construction Company said his firm was 90- to 95-percent complete with the pipe-laying project.

A new 52-bed diagnostic and convalescent wing was reported in the Wednesday, Aug. 5, 1964 paper as being added to Kennestone Hospital in an emergency building program to relieve overcrowding. The Marietta Hospital Authority, in announcing the expansion, said it hoped to begin construction in October. When Kennestone’s 100-bed South Wing was opened in 1959, the hospital operated at a capacity of 74 percent. Since that time, the number of patients needing bed space had gone up with the county’s increasing population and the May-June 1964 statistics showed that hospital beds were filled to a 96 percent capacity.

The following day, Aug. 6, 1964, the paper reported that the Lockheed-Georgia Company and the First National Bank of Marietta had pledged $80,000 toward erection of the new addition at Kennestone. Lockheed would donate $75,000, said Lockheed President Dick Pulver. William Beasley, president of the bank, revealed the financial institution would give $5,000.

Another story that day reported the National Urban League, an interracial integrationist organization, asked President Johnson to end racial discrimination in federally assisted public housing in Marietta and 10 other Georgia cities. Whitney M. Young Jr., Urban League executive director, submitted a report to the White House contending the disbursement of government money to these projects were of “doubtful legality” under Title VI of the new Civil Rights Act. The League contended that Marietta operated six totally segregated housing projects – three black and three white.

20 years ago …

In the Saturday, Aug. 6, 1994 paper, it was reported that Marietta Police received a tip that a sniper may try to pick off gays and lesbians attending an upcoming rally on the Marietta Square. Police were given copies of the Internet messages that included – “Are there any nice hills nearby with a clear shot at the demonstrators?” The message went on to say that the “cute little pink triangles [featured on t-shirts worn by gay and lesbian protestors] make such good targets.” Marietta Police Chief Ralph Carter said his department was not investigating the messages because “we don’t’ even know if it’s authentic.” But, he said his department was seeking help from Cobb Police and the messages were also sent to the FBI.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Fair Oaks 1964 Jet Crash
by Damon_Poirier
August 06, 2014 04:00 AM | 1230 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Fifty years ago, last week, the Marietta Daily Journal reported on a terrible tragedy suffered by the Fair Oaks Community when a Navy Fury jet fighter on approach to Naval Air Station Atlanta at Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Marietta crashed into a residential home and killed two occupants.

The Fair Oaks community, which was named for its many mature native oak trees, was located just outside the city limits of Smyrna and Marietta.

Investigators said that the Navy jet seemed to have dropped straight down from the sky atop the white frame home on Austell Road, which was right under the runway approach, shortly after 5 p.m. on Saturday, July 25, 1964.

Sisters L.V. Cassidy, 61, and Ostella Cassidy, 58, and Marine Reserve pilot, Lt. Joseph Martin Walker, 25, died in the crash.

The Fair Oaks tragedy was the first fatality for the Marine Air Reserve in Atlanta since the Naval Air Reserve moved to Marietta three years earlier and from the time the Chamblee base was established in 1946.

According to neighbors, there was no engine noise as the jet approached. It was said that it seemed to be making a normal approach, then tilted a wing, dropped from the sky and crashed through the home, which was immediately engulfed in flames.

Idell Pickens, 58, had been visiting the Cassidy sisters and was walking to her car in the driveway when the crash occurred. She was found in the back yard, screaming for help and suffering from burns. She was taken to Kennestone Hospital in Marietta for treatment.

The Cassidy sisters’ minister, Rev. L. Howard Gordon of Crestview Baptist Church, was reported as having just left the home three minutes before crash occurred. He had been visiting L.V. Cassidy, who had suffered a heart attack two years earlier.

W.W. Allen, a third sister – who had been keeping up the house and nursing her sister, L.V., was at the grocery store at the time of the crash. Allen had planned to bake a cake for her two sisters and went out to pick up a lemon cake mix. She was at a grocery store on Powder Springs Road when she heard the sirens and had a premonition that something was wrong.

Allen said that she and her sisters had been used to seeing planes flying over the home every few minutes.

“They flew so low they sucked up the curtains in the living and caused the leaves to quiver,” Allen was quoted as saying.

It took Allen an hour to drive the mile home from the store due to the traffic jam caused by curiosity-seekers trying to see where the plane had crashed. Recounting her ordeal, she said that the streets were jammed with cars, Austell Road was blocked off and that a policeman tried to stop her when she got close.

Eventually, Allen got within sight of her home and saw the flames that had engulfed her house.

Later in the day, among the roped off “charred, acrid-smelling ruins,” four Navy guards were placed on duty to guard the site even though fragments of the jet had been removed.

MDJ Reporter Ruth Schuster reported the following observations –

“A back portion of the home, where the kitchen and bathroom had once been still remains standing.

“A refrigerator, black with burns, lies on its side, the door knocked off. About 30 feet away are two ice-cube trays. The oven lies near the refrigerator. A tea kettle, still shiny, lies nearby. Only a kitchen sink and a water heater remain upright.

“Where the bedrooms were, one can see burned blankets and quilts. A blackened bedspring lies nearby. Ashes of papers and pictures are all over. A green and white box used by a Cobb Center department store at Christmas time, lies by itself among the ruins, apparently unharmed.”

Following the crash, Admiral David L. McDonald, the Chief of Naval Operations, issued a statement to Capt. J.N. Durio, the Commanding Officer of Naval Air Station Atlanta, which read –

“Please pass to the mayor and officials of Marietta, Georgia, together with the members of the Navy League Chapter, my deepest personal regrets over the tragedy of this afternoon, which resulted in the loss of life to local residents. They may rest assured of the Navy’s wholehearted assistance as may be necessary.”

Later that evening, Capt. Durio issued his own statement, which read –

“On behalf of the officers and men of the Naval Air Station Atlanta. I wish to express my wholehearted sympathy and personal regrets to all who were involved in the day’s tragic crash. The Navy/Marine Corps team strives constantly to operate our aircraft with the maximum degree of safety and consideration for the civilian community at all times. Please be advised that an immediate and thorough investigation will be conducted and all claims for damage will be handled as expediently as possible. The timely assistance of local law enforcement agencies and fire departments at the crash scene were greatly appreciated. Again, I join the Chief of Naval Operations, Adm. David L. McDonald, in expressing the deepest sympathies of the U.S. Navy in your community’s loss.”

In the Monday, July 27, 1964 paper, Cobb Commission Chairman candidate Ernest Barrett was reported as having called on the federal government to buy homes and property in the Fair Oaks area in a move to prevent a repeat of the disaster. Barrett, who operated a laundry in Fair Oaks, said he would call Sen. Herman Talmadge and Rep. John Davis to urge the initiation of the plan. Barrett’s plan involved the government buying all property in the landing pattern between South Cobb Drive and Old Highway 41.

The following day, Tuesday, July 28, 1964, it was reported that Rep. John Davis called on the Air Force to investigate immediately the feasibility of taking steps at Dobbins Air Force Base to prevent future accidents. In a telegram to Air Force Secretary Eugene Zuckert, Rep. Davis asked if the property at runway approaches couldn’t be bought by the federal government.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of July 31
by Damon_Poirier
August 02, 2014 04:00 AM | 1035 views | 0 0 comments | 11 11 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at desegregation, Republicans, Lockheed, a burglar, a rapist and the Olympics.

100 years ago …

In Friday, July 31, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page advertisement about Gov. John M. Slaton, a candidate for short term senator, having a speaking event the next day at the Marietta courthouse. Slaton, who was billed as “an eloquent and forceful speaker,” was expected to discuss the issues of the campaign.

A second story that week reported that W.A. Sams, the former owner of the Butler Drug Company, had bought back the property after his return from Florida. Doyle P. Butler was said to devote his time now entirely to the sale of several lines of automobiles.

A third item reported that the Civic League would have a carnival on Sept. 3 to raise funds for improving sidewalks in Marietta. The event would have “a baby show and a parade of decorated automobiles in the afternoon.” At night the carnival would “be held with all the gaiety of music, illuminations, confetti and decorated booths.”

50 years ago …

Public and “quasi-public” facilities at Lake Allatoona were reported in the Friday, July 24, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as having been directed to desegregate by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which controls the lake area. Officials said the land and water areas will be open to the public “without regard to race, creed, color or national origin.”

Also that day it was reported that the construction contract for a new $700,000 air-conditioned junior high school on “Old 41” highway between Kennesaw and Acworth was expected to be announced in a week. Aaron Torch and Sons of Macon was the apparent low bidder and the architect was Cleveland M. Call Jr. of Marietta. J.J. Jordan, assistant school superintendent, said the as yet unnamed school was scheduled to be completed by September 1965.

Located next to North Cobb Senior High School, the junior high was to have a round dome-type gymnasium constructed of laminated wood arches. The education unit would contain 10 classrooms, four general science rooms, home economics and kitchen facilities, administrator offices, wood working shop, metal-working/electrical shop, drafting/planning rooms and a music department consisting of a band room, choral room and practice rooms.

In the Sunday, July 26, 1964 paper it was reported that whoever took a blue, 1964 pick-up truck from the Marietta Termite and Pest Control Co. some time the Friday before needed to contact the pest control company or a doctor immediately. Police recovered part of the equipment, including a foot valve from a drum of toxic pesticides, on Blue Springs Road near Acworth. The company said that the truck thief who removed it was in deadly danger and that getting the chemicals on their body or breathing in the fumes could be extremely dangerous.

It was also reported that day that Cobb Republicans had candidates for 17 offices – three of them county commission posts – in the party’s first county primary election in the fall. The candidates for the commission posts were Marietta businessman Barney Nunn, South Cobb businessman F.Y. Dillingham and J.T. Hulsey, an Atlanta industrial maintenance consultant.

Lockheed Aircraft Corporation reported in the Wednesday, July 29, 1964 paper net earnings of $21,333,000 for the six months ending June 28. This was less than one-percent below the $21,471,000 for the same 1963 period. The performance was in the face of a decline in sales that had been predicted earlier and despite a $2,250,000 tax credit that benefited the 1963 total.

In the Thursday, July 30, 1964 paper it was reported that a barefoot burglar crept through a Marietta home and fled with $7 in cash after being frightened by one of the home’s residents. The thief fled when he flipped on a light in a room and woke the person. As the man ran out of the house, he apparently cut his bare feet on some glass in the kitchen.

Navy officials announced in the Friday, July 31, 1964 paper that the General Construction Company in Marietta had been awarded a $384,000 contract to build one new building at the Naval Air Station and add an extensive addition to another. The contract was executed between the Marietta firm and the Southeast Division Bureau of Yards and Docks of the Department of the Navy in Charleston, S.C. A completely modern unit, the new enlisted barracks will provide accommodations for 100 men.

20 years ago …

In the Wednesday, July 27, 1994 paper it was reported that an increasingly bold knife-wielding man had assaulted two women in the past week in a Windy Hill Road apartment complex and Cobb Police were warning residents in the area to take extra precautions. Both victims were attacked in the early morning hours at the Magnolia Lakes apartments on Windy Hill Road just west of Interstate 75. Investigators said that the man attacked both women while family members or roommates were present in the apartment.



The Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games was reported in the Friday, July 29, 1994 paper as expecting to announce within 10 days that it would pull preliminary volleyball from the Cobb Galleria Centre. Rumors had been circulating for weeks, but sources said the impending medical leave of Dick Yarbrough, a top ACOG policy maker, was spurring Olympic officials to move quickly. Olympic volleyball represented more than $700,000 in rental fees for the Cobb Galleria Centre.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of July 17
by Damon_Poirier
July 19, 2014 04:00 AM | 800 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a helicopter crash, a strike, a new radar system and a toxic dump list.

100 years ago …

In Friday, July 17, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, the front page was taken up by an advertisement for Henry A. Ward & Co. of Marietta’s Yellow Tag Sale. Some of the bargains were full cut vests for ladies at five-cents each, pencil tablets for three-cents each, large jelly glasses and tumblers at two cents each; and a yard of linen lace for one-cent.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, July 12, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that a Marine helicopter participating in Air Force survival training exercises at Lake Allatoona crashed at the Navy Atlanta Recreation Site on the lake. None of the four Marines aboard the craft were hurt. Capt. Jack Durio of the Naval Air Station, Marietta said that the first reports from the crash scene indicated that the aircraft was a total loss and apparently crashed into trees and shrubs on the lake shore while hovering for a landing.

The following day, Monday, July 13, 1964, an Atlanta construction worker was reported as having drowned in the lake after going for a lone 2 a.m. swim. When the man, who was camping with his wife and friends, did not return a search by the Bartow County Rescue Unit commenced. The man’s body was found at 6 a.m. in about 10 feet of water in a cove near King’s Landing, which was close to Acworth.

Another story that day reported the new Shoreham Nursing Home had admitted its first patients. The opening of the 100-bed medical nursing home, the first of its kind in Cobb County, was expected to relieve overcrowding at Kennestone Hospital. Located in a six-wing brick and glass building on Kennesaw Avenue, Shoreham was less than half a mile away from the hospital. The facility provided long-term convalescent care to patients who did not need the intensive medical care at a hospital. The nursing home, built at a cost of $1 million, featured semi-private and private rooms at rates of $250 to $400 a month.

In the Tuesday, July 14, 1964 paper it was reported that the five-day walkout at the Austell Box Board Company had resulted in two arrests of non-strikers as they crossed picket lines at the plant’s entrance. In one incident, a man was charged with pointing a pistol at the picketers as he entered the plant. In another, a man was charged with hitting a picketer with his truck and failing to stop. The walkout began when a group of men asked the company for a higher percentage of the profit sharing plan, better wages and better working conditions.

A black man was reported in the Thursday, July 16, 1964 paper as being listed in poor condition at Kennestone Hospital after he was struck by a car on Whitlock Avenue. The man was hurt while he was standing on the sidewalk giving directions to a woman in a car that had stopped on the roadway. Police said that another driver came up on the stopped car, lost control, went up on the sidewalk and struck the man.

Some 12,000 employees of the Lockheed-Georgia Company, Marietta Plant, were reported in the Friday, July 17, 1964 paper as expecting to receive pay increases ranging from five to 11 cents an hour. Also affected by the raise were Lockheed’s Atlanta and Dawsonville offices. Altogether the raises for the union employees totaled more than $2 million dollars a year and came under agreements negotiated in 1962.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, July 11, 1994 MDJ it was reported that a new Doppler radar system at Dobbins Air Reserve Base would give Cobb emergency officials a quicker jump on threatening weather such as the tornado that had hit the county in late June. The Doppler system was funded by the Department of Defense, the National Weather Service, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the Federal Aviation Administration. System components were installed in the military weather station at Dobbins a week ago and the last of the necessary software was loaded into the computers over the weekend. The new system had the ability to spot “mesocyclones,” violent storm centers that were likely to spawn tornadoes.

Also that day, the Rev. Al Sharpton was reported as calling on civil rights leaders to take responsibility for curbing violence in black communities. Speaking to about 30 people at Club Escape on Franklin Road in Marietta, Rev. Sharpton said those leaders had been slow to respond to the number of crimes committed by blacks against other blacks. He spoke on behalf of The Empowerment Group, a newly created 40-member organization in Atlanta, which was established by his sister – Joy Bachman.

Seven of the 279 worst hazardous waste sites in Georgia were reported in the Tuesday, July 12, 1994 paper as being in Cobb County. However, none of the Cobb locations were considered “Class 1” - which were known or suspected to have caused serious health or environmental problems and slated for immediate cleanup. The state Hazardous Site Response Act, passed in 1993, required Georgia officials annually publish a list of hazardous waste sites and site owners were expected to pay for cleanup efforts. This was the first list published and Cobb’s sites included the Cheatham Road Landfill, the Corners Shopping Center, Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Lockheed Aeronautical Systems, Georgia Metals, CP Chemicals and Georgia Power, Powder Springs. 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of July 10
by Damon_Poirier
July 12, 2014 04:00 AM | 750 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a drunken pony, a sniper and the first black students at Marietta High School.

100 years ago …

In Friday, July 10, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about a man who was severely shocked when lightning struck his house, tore out a window within six inches of his head as he was lying in bed. The electricity struck his left shoulder and ran down his leg, leaving a badly burned place three inches wide.

A second story that week reported that Lucius Dubignon Clay, who would later become famous as the general in charge of occupied Germany after World War II, was reported as receiving his appointment to West Point from Sen. West who had fulfilled the promise made to Clay’s mother by the late Sen. Bacon.

50 years ago …

Juvenile Court Judge Conley Ingram was reported in the Sunday, July 5, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as saying that the abandoned baby found in Marietta mentioned in last week’s column was to be put up for adoption in a month if the child’s parents were not located. The infant, named Henry Conley Joiner by the supervisor of the Juvenile Home, was found on the front seat of Richard S. Joiner’s car in June. At first the child was thought to be a baby kidnapped from a Chicago hospital two days after birth, but detectives determined that was not the case.

Acworth city officials were reported in the Monday, July 6, 1964 paper as saying that they knew who had placed a drunken pony in the city jail and were looking for enough evidence to bring the case before a Cobb County Grand Jury. A special police committee of Acworth city councilmen had been urged to “accelerate investigation” of the pony incident and a series of other pranks played recently on Acworth law enforcement officers. Acworth Mayor Mary McCall had also called in the GBI and the Cobb Sheriff’s Office to help obtain evidence against the pranksters.

A second story that day reported that bloodhounds were requested from Cobb Police to help track down a prisoner who escaped from a work detail at Red Top Mountain State Park in Bartow County. The escapee had been imprisoned at the Ellijay prison camp and was believed to be hiding out on the mountain.

In the Tuesday, July 7, 1964 paper it was reported that a group of citizens threatened the Smyrna City Council with legal action if the council denied any responsibility for a drainage problem on San Fernando Drive. The citizens, represented by an attorney, said that water was washing down from a street above them and bringing “beer cans” and other garbage into their yards. The water flow, the attorney said, was caused by the city’s installation of a drainage pipe into a natural drainage ditch, which changed the direction and flow into the backyards of his clients.

An unknown sniper was reported in the Wednesday, July 8, 1964 paper as having fired five shots at Marietta Patrolman Pat W. Paul as he sat in his car at the Reynolds and Wright streets intersection. Paul, who was not hit, was stopped near the intersection’s corner and was making out his daily reports when he heard the windshield crash. He said that he ducked into the seat as three more shots came through the window.

Cobb Democratic Party leaders were reported in the Thursday, July 9, 1964 paper as setting a qualifying period for candidates after voters overwhelmingly approved a change from a single to a multiple commissioner county government in a referendum held the day before. More than 10,000 voters turned out at the polls to pile up a 7,297 to 2,791 victory margin for the governmental change. The first multiple seat commission was to take office in January 1965.

In the Friday, July 10, 1964 paper it was reported that two black students filed applications for transfer to Marietta High School at the beginning of the September school term. Speaking for the Marietta Board of Education, City School Superintendent Henry Kemp confirmed that the applications had been received, but would not reveal the names.

20 years ago …

The storm that caused severe flooding south of Atlanta was reported in the Thursday, July 7, 1994 paper as having dropped more than three inches of rain on Cobb County over the course of four days and more was on the way.

In the following day’s paper, Friday, July 8, 1994, it was reported that the death toll in south Georgia had hit 18 and that divers were searching for bodies in murky floodwaters while rescuers were plucking stranded people out of trees. Bottled water was the most-needed relief item in the flood-stricken counties, according to the Salvation Army’s Cobb unit, which was sending its mobile unit into the area.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of July 3
by Damon_Poirier
July 05, 2014 04:00 AM | 928 views | 0 0 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a flag, a baby, Viet Nam, Civil Rights, tornadoes and C-130s.

100 years ago …

In Friday, July 3, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about Gov. Joseph M. Brown of Marietta declaring his candidacy for the U.S. Senate against Sen. Hoke Smith. His published announcement was brief and his platform was expected to be released at a later date. The announcement also said that he planned to open his campaign headquarters by or shortly after July 15.

A second story that week reported that on June 14th a silk American flag measuring 6-feet by 10-feet was unfurled on top of a 115-foot pole, “the tallest flagstaff in Georgia and given to the Austell High School” by a young business man in the city. An electric light was placed on top of the pole so it could be seen from Marietta.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, June 28, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that the South repulsed the North in a furious battle on the slopes of the Kennesaw Mountain battlefield at the county farm as part of the week-long centennial celebration of the Civil War battle at the mountain. The mock battle involved some 2,000 reactivated troopers in uniform.

Also that day, Cobb Legislative Candidate Hugh Lee McDaniell revealed his plans to ask the General Assembly to approve a $100-million state-financed Urban Roads Program in a move to ease traffic woes in Cobb and other rapidly growing counties. McDaniell, who was seeking election to the House post being vacated by Rep. Joe Mack Wilson, said he would ask Gov. Carl Sanders to give administrative backing to the plan.

The name “Harry Conley Joiner” was given to the four-month old baby that was mentioned in last week’s column. The child was named by Herman Hughes, supervisor of the Cobb Juvenile Home, and his wife with permission given by Richard S. Joiner in whose car the abandoned baby was found. Investigators were still looking to find the child’s parents.

In the Tuesday, June 30, 1964 paper it was reported that a suit was filed to prevent Commissioner Herbert McCollum from continuing with plans for construction of the new judicial and public safety buildings. The suit was to be heard by Cobb Superior Court Judge Albert Henderson.

A grieving Marietta widow was reported in the Wednesday, July 1, 1964 paper as waiting at home for a last letter which was believed to be sent by her 25-year-old husband just before he was killed in combat in South Viet Nam. The soldier was killed when the U.S. turbo-jet helicopter he was piloting was shot down by Communist guerillas.

Another story in that paper reported that a 20-year-old Austell housewife was killed when the taxi in which she was a passenger crashed into the Sweetwater Creek bridge abutment on State Route 6. The woman was dead on arrival at Kennestone Hospital from severe head and chest injuries. She was the 17th fatality in the county for the year and the second in a week.

A high ranking Naval officer was reported in the Thursday, July 2, 1964 paper as having landed his jet plane at the wrong airfield. At 11:30 p.m., a T-33 Naval trainer plane carrying the two officers arrived from Patuxent River, Md., but instead of landing at Dobbins Air Force Base the plane pulled into privately operated McCollum Airport, which is no known as Cobb County Airport – McCollum Field, in Kennesaw. The speeding jet plane sailed off the end of the runway onto a graded area and was stopped just a few feet shy of a steep 50-foot embankment.

A second story that day reported five fire alarms came into the Marietta fire station all within a period of nine minutes. All of the alarms were false and two teenage brothers were apprehended. Capt. Bartow Adair, head of the fire prevention bureau, said the boys were caught after they wrecked and abandoned the family car on the railroad tracks on Dobbs Street.

Three young black men were reported as being served at a previously segregated lunch counter in Cobb County in the Friday, July 3, 1964 paper in a test of the public accommodation section of the new Civil Rights Act. The men were reported as integrating the lunch counter at a downtown Marietta store without incident and more tests were expected in the county. Other Cobb County restaurants and motel operators who refused to accommodate blacks in the past said they would comply with the new act which was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson the day before.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, June 28, 1994 MDJ it was reported that two storms, accompanied by tornado-force winds, slammed into east and west Cobb, damaging about 130 homes, shearing and uprooting hundreds of trees and leaving thousands without power. Although the damage was extensive, only one minor injury was reported for Cobb County. Across the state, however, two people were killed and dozens injured by the storms.

Another story that day reported up to 30 C-130s were in the pipeline for Cobb-based Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co., but the defense contractor said more planes were needed to prevent additional layoffs. The House Appropriations Committee, at the urging of U.S. Rep. George “Buddy” Darden (D-Marietta), added $330 million to its fiscal 1996 Defense Appropriations Act to buy 10 C-130 cargo planes. The House Armed Services Committee also budgeted for two C-130s and the Senate Armed Services Committee had added money for eight cargo planes.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of June 26
by Damon_Poirier
June 28, 2014 04:00 AM | 772 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Marietta’s abandoned baby and the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain centennial events.

100 years ago …

In Friday, June 26, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about the then-upcoming unveiling of the marble and bronze Cheatham’s Hill Monument to the soldiers of the State of Illinois who fought at the site during the Civil War. The monument was to be unveiled almost 50 years to the day of the famous battle. Illinois Gov. Edward Duune and his staff along with “a party of veterans of the Federal army” were expected to be on hand.

A second story that week reported that J. Gid Morris of Belmont, near Marietta, sent the first cotton blooms of the year to the Journal’s office. The blooms were found on June 18 on his farm. Another farmer, C.J. Weaver, brought in a bloom to the paper that opened on June 21 near town while H.H. Carrie of Kennesaw brought in two cotton blooms from his farm less than a week ago.

50 years ago …

Colorfully-clad Union and Confederate troopers from across the country were reported in the Sunday, June 21, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as arriving in the county for the week-long “commemoration of the bloody Battle of Kennesaw Mountain.” At least 2,000 “reactivated” Civil War soldiers from more than 30 states were expected to participate in the event – billed as “one of the largest ever planned in the four-year, nationwide centennial.”

Also that day, it was reported that photographs taken of the four-month old abandoned baby mentioned in last week’s column were ruled unsuitable by the FBI and a request for more pictures were made. The pictures, which were to be used to identify if the child was a kidnapped child from Chicago, were made by a commercial photographer in Marietta and flown to Chicago by jet. Special emphasis was given to the baby’s ear lobes. Since no footprints were made of the child before it was stolen, the ear lobes “presented the best possibility for identification.”

The following day, Monday, June 22, 1964, it was reported that Marietta’s abandoned baby was not the missing Chicago baby. FBI Special Agent Marlin M. Johnson of the Chicago FBI office said medical experts studied the photos of the two babies and found seven physical differences including the shape of the ears.

A Civil War medic’s exhibit reported in the Tuesday, June 23, 1964 paper showed the medical uniforms, instruments and methods of 100 years ago as part of the events of the centennial celebration. The exhibition was held at the First Presbyterian Church in Marietta, located on the same site of its original building on Church Street which served as one of the five hospitals in the city during the Civil War.

Rep. Joe Mack Wilson, leader of a legislative move to prevent Atlanta from annexing property in Cobb County, was quoted in the Wednesday, June 24, 1964 paper as saying that he saw no immediate danger that the city would spread across the Chattahoochee River. Wilson told members of the Cobb Real Estate Board that his effort – blocked in the General Assembly by Fulton and DeKalb county legislators – was aimed at providing protection “15 to 20 years” down the road.

A band of dedicated Rebels from the unlikely Confederate states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Michigan were reported in the Thursday, June 25, 1964 paper as clattering into Marietta to join the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain Centennial celebration. Crowds gathered on the sidewalks as the colorful unit of mounted cavalrymen, horse drawn supply wagons and artillery pieces arrived after a four-day ride through north Georgia. The troops reportedly fired pistols and muskets while whooping and hollering on their march through town.

The commanding officer of a reactivated Confederate cavalry unit from Nashville, Tenn., was reported in the Friday, June 26, 1964 paper as becoming the first serious casualty of the Cobb County centennial when a replica Civil War cannon exploded. Lt. Gen. Richard Cornwell of the 1st Tennessee Cavalry suffered a broken cheek bone and the near loss of his eye as the artillery piece misfired. Witnesses said a fragment of the shattered barrel struck Cornwell in the face as he watched a demonstration of the firing of the old-fashioned gun at the centennial encampment on Clay Street. The cannon apparently overloaded with a blank charge of powder, was torn apart by the explosion.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, June 21, 1994 MDJ it was reported that after a three-day search of the Chattahoochee River, Cobb County police divers found the body of a Smyrna man who they believed was knocked off his bicycle into the water by a hit-and-run driver on a Cobb Parkway bridge.

State Sen. Johnny Isakson was quoted in the Friday, June 24, 1994 paper as saying that Cobb’s resolution critical of the gay lifestyle “was a mistake, and rescinding it would be the best thing we could possibly do.” But, the east Cobb Republican said he doubted that would occur and told a Marietta Kiwanis luncheon that he supported a compromise resolution offered by Cobb Commission Chairman Bill Byrne.

Another story that day, reported that Cobb County had tentatively agreed to shell out $100,000 to lawyers who won a 2½ year battle to stop Cobb from displaying a Ten Commandments plaque in the State Court building. Assistant county attorney Jerry Gentry and Gerald Weber, legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union, reached the agreement on June 17.

In the Saturday, June 25, 1994 paper it was reported that the day before a Wells Fargo truck skidded off the road on wet pavement to avoid a stopped vehicle making a left turn near the corner of Canton Highway and Shallowford Road. None of the money fell out in the crash. The driver and two guards stationed in back were taken to Kennestone Hospital in Marietta with minor injuries. Shortly after the accident, four other guards arrived and safely transported the money from the overturned vehicle to another Wells Fargo truck that quickly left the scene.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of June 19
by Damon_Poirier
June 21, 2014 04:00 AM | 803 views | 0 0 comments | 12 12 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at the Lockheed StarLifter, train sideswipes, an abandoned baby and a gay pride rally.

100 years ago …

In Friday, June 19, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about an 18-year-old man who died from severe injuries after he dove into the Chattahoochee River and struck a rock or a tree stump.

A second story that week reported that “a great amount of damage was done to the crops in various parts of the county” during thunderstorms that happened the week before. Among the damage, one man in the northern part of the county had his barn blown down and outright killed one of his mules while two other mules were fatally injured. A second man had his barn blown down, a mule badly injured and his porch blown completely over the house, but not badly damaged. A third man had his cotton house blown down and his crop was almost ruined by hail, while a fourth man’s store was almost crushed when a big tree blew down and barely missed it.

50 years ago …

The first transcontinental hop of the U.S. Air Force C-141A – the Lockheed-Marietta made StarLifter – was reported in the Sunday, June 14, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as being scheduled to depart from Dobbins Air Force Base. Maj. Joe Sciele and his USAF crew were to fly the fanjet giant to Edwards Air Force Base in California to begin accelerated service testing of the craft.

At the end of the week, in the Friday, June 19, 1964 paper, it was reported that President Lyndon Johnson had inspected the StarLifter during a visit to the 300,000-acre Air Force flight test center. The 158-ton fanjet transport, with an American flag painted on its four-story high T-tail, was flanked by three typical king-sized loads which it could airlift, nonstop at more than 500 miles per hour across either the Atlantic or the Pacific oceans. President Johnson was greeted on arrival by Brig. Gen. Irving L. Branch, commander of the test center in the Mojave Desert, Lockheed President Daniel J. Haughton and Vice President Clarence L. Johnson, and other high ranking military officials and aerospace executives. It was the first Presidential visit to Edwards Air Force Base since it was established 22 years earlier.

In the Monday, June 15, 1964 paper it was reported for the second time in a week two Louisville and Nashville freight trains were reported as having sideswiped at the “south switch” in Kennesaw just west of the Four-Lane Highway, now known as U.S. Hwy. 41. The two diesel-drawn L&N freights smacked together at the same location where a similar accident occurred four days earlier. The first sideswipe resulted in the death of an engineer, who was killed when the 100-ton diesel engine toppled over on him. In the second sideswipe, the southbound train, No. 831, struck the northbound train, Second No. 2, sending tank and box cars in every direction. Some cars were knocked 100 feet off the tracks. The south switch was a point where the main line ran off about a mile south of Kennesaw.

A 4-month-old baby boy wrapped in a white blanket was reported in the Tuesday, June 14, 1964 paper as having been found before dawn wiggling and crying in the front seat of a car parked on Freyer Drive. The child was found by a paperboy who heard the child’s cries and went to investigate.

Later that week, on Thursday, June 18, 1964, it was reported that a three-day old baby snatched from his mother’s arms in back in April in a Chicago hospital could possibly be the one found abandoned in Marietta. A woman disguised as a nurse snatched the boy from his mother as she was feeding him in a Chicago maternity hospital. Marietta Police and the FBI were reported as seeking more information on the case.

The following day, Friday, June 19, 1964, there was a story stating that police were waiting on the results of a blood test to determine if the abandoned infant was the kidnapped child in Chicago. Marietta Police said it was a one in a million chance the two babies were the same, but the possibility was being thoroughly checked out.

The Air Force announced in the Wednesday, June 17, 1964 paper that it had signed a “multi-year” contract with Lockheed-Georgia Company for approximately $500 million for purchase of 127 C-141 StarLifter aircraft. The planes, which Lockheed had been working on while negotiations were taking place, brought the total Air Force contract for StarLifters to 132. The contract, announced by the Aeronautical Systems Division Headquarters at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, inaugurated a new concept of multi-year procurements designed to save money and improve control of the Air Force’s weapon systems procurement.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, June 13, 1994 MDJ it was reported that Pat Hussein, co-chair of the Atlanta gay-activist group – Olympics Out of Cobb, vowed to more than 130,000 gay rights supporters during intermittent rain in Atlanta’s Piedmont Park to make a national issue out of Cobb County’s resolution critical of the gay lifestyle. The effort was to be aimed at persuading officials of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games to pull preliminary volleyball from the county-owned Cobb Galleria Centre. The rain did little to dampen the enthusiasm of the crowd whose members carried signs, one of which said - “Olympics in Cobb – The Worst Idea since New Coke.” The rally in Piedmont Park followed a march from the Atlanta Civic Center to close out Gay Pride Week, an annual celebration of gay rights.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of June 5
by Damon_Poirier
June 07, 2014 04:00 AM | 751 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a car accident, Lockheed, mysterious waters, a Ten Commandments plaque, the anti-gay resolution and Pat Robertson.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, June 5, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about a local man who was bed-ridden with his left arm crushed, his nose broken and covered in bruises and scratches after being thrown out of a racing car near Smyrna. The Atlanta man who was driving the car lost control after striking a deep rut and the tire exploded causing the vehicle to overturn. The driver was pinned beneath the car and was severely burned about his body and his forehead lacerated. A second passenger, from Atlanta, was also thrown from the car and suffered an injury to his right leg below the knee. All three were expected to recover.

A second story that week reported an ordinance to prohibit the operation of automobiles, motorcycles or other motor vehicles within the Marietta city limits unless the vehicle was equipped with a muffler. The ordinance also stated that there would be no repairs or work done on vehicles on the streets or other public places of the city.

The front page also reported the death of the Journal’s composing room foreman, William Alfred Walker, who died from acute pneumonia after being ill only a few days.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, May 31, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that a red, white and blue Lockheed-Georgia built Hercules soared off the Dobbins Air Force Base runway on a 4,930-mile nonstop flight to Turin, Italy. The plane, christened “One World,” was scheduled to touch down at Castle Airport in the northern Italy city that morning. It was the first leg of a 40,000-mile trip around the globe.

Another story that day reported the new Cobb County Judicial Building was going to have a fourth floor added to the plans. The decision to add the extra floor was agreed upon between Commissioner Herbert McCollum and Clerk of Court John LeCroy.

While most residents in the Terrell Mill Road area were suffering from the effects of a drought, one family was reported in the Monday, June 1, 1964 paper as having a mysterious and relentless source springing up everywhere on their property. The King family said that water began bubbling and oozing up from their landscaped front yard about two months earlier and had created a messy marsh. Water was constantly seeping into their basement and forcing them to pump it out every morning. Small streams were reported as running through the yard and forming a deep rising pond at one end.

It was also reported that day that Lockheed Aircraft Corporation placed in operation the fastest teletype relay system in the world, designed to save a quarter-million dollars a year in communications expense and to speed a 100-word telegram between California and Georgia in six seconds flat.

In the Tuesday, June 2, 1964 paper it was reported that a survey of industrial site potentials had been launched by the Cobb Chamber of Commerce. The project was to be conducted by Georgia Tech Research Institute to provide a general appraisal of the then-present industrial site situation in Cobb and follow up with detailed information on specific site areas.

A bill to renew the Elizabeth Community’s controversial 19th century city charter sailed through the State Senate and headed for the desk of Gov. Carl Sanders and executive approval. The Elizabeth Community was located where the present day Church Street Extension runs by Kennestone Hospital out to U.S. Highway 41.

20 years ago …

In the Wednesday, June 1, 1994 MDJ it was reported that Cobb officials lost their fight to display the Ten Commandments in the courthouse lobby and that the county could end up shelling out as much as $150,000 for the plaque. The U.S. Supreme Court’s refusal to hear the county’s appeal upheld earlier federal court rulings forcing the county to remove the plaque from the first-floor lobby of the Cobb State Court building just off the Marietta Square.

More than 80 local religious leaders were also reported as meeting that day behind closed doors to agree to a statement supporting the resolution that Cobb commissioners passed in 1993 that was critical of the gay lifestyle. The group also condemned the practice of homosexuality as a sin, but not “the sinner.”

Televangelist Pat Robertson was reported in the Saturday, June 4, 1994 paper as saying at a reception for Republican candidates at the Cobb Galleria Centre that he endorsed the county’s resolution which found the gay lifestyle incompatible with community standards. While he did not mention the controversial resolution during his brief remarks to a crowd of 700 at the gathering of the Christian Coalition of Georgia, when asked his position he stated that he supported it. Also, during his address to the Cobb-based Georgia arm of his national group, Robertson criticized the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision not to hear Cobb’s appeal of earlier federal rulings which ordered the county to remove a plaque bearing the Ten Commandments.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of May 29
by Damon_Poirier
May 31, 2014 04:00 AM | 770 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a buggy accident, integration, a visit from Robert F. Kennedy and the C-17.

100 years ago …

In Friday, May 29, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about Mrs. J.T. Corley’s near death in a horse and buggy accident. Mrs. Corley was reported as driving a surrey – a popular American door-less, four-wheeled carriage of the late 19th and early 20th century – to Marietta on Powder Springs Road when the horse ran away and jumped over a bridge. Oscar Holtzclaw, who lived near the bridge, was the first to reach Mrs. Corley along with James T. Anderson, who was passing by in his car. The woman suffered a gash on her head, a broken left ankle, a sprained right ankle, a broken left wrist and an injured left hip.

A second story that week reported that a legal advertisement had been placed in the paper by Marietta business men seeking a charter for the Retail Creditman’s Association. The purpose of the Association was to collection information “on every party in Marietta and in Cobb County as far as possible as to their habits of meeting bills and whether or not they are prompt, medium or slow pay.” The information was to be kept in a secretary’s office furnished to the merchants and used by them as a basis of extending credit.

50 years ago …

Commissioner Herbert McCollum was quoted as saying reported in the Sunday, May 24, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal Cobb voters would be asked later in the year to approve a $5,636,000 road bond issue to begin soon after the new administration took over in January. McCollum disclosed his plan in a report to the Streets and Highways Committee of the Cobb Chamber of Commerce. He said that he would call candidates together as soon as the multiple commissioner issue was settled to seek agreement on the program.

In the Monday, May 25, 1964 paper it was reported that the U.S. Supreme Court sent back to Federal District Judge Frank Hooper in Atlanta for more hearings on black complaints that the Atlanta stair step school integration plan was too slow to be called “with deliberate speed.” Hooper had upheld the Atlanta grade-a-year plan several times as it had come under attack from black plaintiffs.

In a brief unsigned opinion read by Chief Justice Earl Warren, the Supreme Court held – “In light of the developments at and since the argument in the Atlanta school desegregation suit we deem it appropriate that the nature and effect of the board’s resolution of April 8, 1964 be appraised by the district court in a proper evidentiary hearing.” The resolution referred to by the high court was one adopted by the Atlanta School Board in what it reduced to only three points the procedure on which transfer of black students to white schools would be based.

Burglars were reported in the Tuesday, May 26, 1964 paper as having beat open a safe with a sledge hammer at the Rio Vista Restaurant and escaped with over $2,300 cash and a large amount of securities.

Another story that day reported that a 37-year-old Austell man, an escapee from the Milledgeville State Hospital, was being held in the county jail “awaiting the issue of a warrant charging him with rape of a 23-year-old woman patient at the hospital.”

In the Wednesday, May 27, 1964 paper that Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on a stop in Cobb County laid a wreath at a magnolia tree dedicated to his brother, the late President John F. Kennedy, at Dobbins Air Force Base. Gen. George H. Wilson, commander of Dobbins, clipped the tree’s solitary bloom and gave it to Kennedy to take to President Kennedy’s wife, Jacqueline Kennedy. Robert Kennedy and his wife, Ethel, flew to Dobbins in a Lockheed-Georgia built JetStar. They then proceeded to Carrollton where Kennedy dedicated an inter-faith chapel to his brother at West Georgia College.

20 years ago …

Cobb’s resolution critical of gay lifestyles was reported in the Tuesday, May 24, 1994 MDJ as receiving overwhelming backing from county commissioners around the state in an anonymous survey, but few had acted to push the resolution in their own communities. A Kennesaw State College study conducted during January and February 1994, when protests by gay rights activists were at a lull, found a large percentage of Georgia’s commissioners said they personally agreed with the Cobb commission’s resolution. Another large percentage said that they would support a similar measure in their own county. But out of all of Georgia’s counties, only Wayne County in southeast Georgia had adopted a similar resolution.

In the Wednesday, May 25, 1994 paper it was reported that the C-17, an airlifter designated to replace the Cobb-based Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co.’s C-141 and eventually the C-5, was kept alive in the House and got an unexpected boost from Rep. Newt Gingrich, R-east Cobb. In a crucial decision, the House voted to restore $1 billion in funding to the troubled McDonnell Douglas plant, boosting production from four to six aircraft in fiscal 1996. It was also a victory for the Clinton administration, which had initially proposed funding six C-17s. However, the House Armed Services Committee had slashed production to four and had designated the savings – about $1 billion – to be placed in a special “airlift fund,” created to buy off-the-shelf aircraft – such as Lockheed’s C-5B.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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