MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at some ads, annexations, TIME magazine, an evacuation and Civil War fortifications.
February 07, 2016 01:00 AM | 273154 views | 0 0 comments | 5061 5061 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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The Week of Nov. 26
by Damon_Poirier
November 30, 2015 04:00 AM | 842 views | 0 0 comments | 40 40 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at blind tigers, bomb threats, Newt Gingrich and the space shuttle.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Nov. 26, 1915, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier it was reported on the front page that blind tigers, places which illegally sold alcoholic beverages, were “getting it hot and heavy in the Superior Court” that week.

One man was given the hardest of Judge Patterson’s sentences – 12 months on a chain-gang, six months in jail and a $1,000 fine. While a Vinings man was reported as being fined and ordered to leave Cobb County under a suspended sentence of 12 months. If he returned to the county as he had once before, the court would order him to serve his time in prison down in Milledgeville.

♦♦♦

Another story on the front page reported that in the show window of the Anderson Brother’s store were 73 ribbons representing prizes that had been recently won by James T. Anderson’s herd of 75 Hereford cattle. Among the prizes were eight ribbons won in Atlanta at a world open contest in which one of his Herefords beat out an imported bull.

♦♦♦

The death of W.J. “Uncle Billy” Manning, a 73-year-old resident of Powder Springs Road, was also reported in that edition. Manning was a Confederate veteran of Phillip’s Legion and a member of Marietta Camp 763, which attended the funeral and stood at attention on each side of the long drive from Manning’s home to the street as the casket was carried to the hearse.

Another death reported in the paper belonged to Mrs. Alonzo Carter who had been sick for three months with Typhoid Fever.

♦♦♦

A fifth story that week reported that G.W. Almand, who lived near Smyrna, presented a three pound yellow globe turnip for inspection at the newspaper’s office. It also said that Almand had a five pound purple top turnip on display in the show window at Sam’s drug store.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Nov. 21, 1965, Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that one of the four teenage boys arrested in connection with the series of bomb threats plaguing Cobb County schools, which was mentioned in Time Capsule on Nov. 12, appeared before Civil and Criminal Court Judge Howell Ravan. The 17-year-old’s attorney asked the judge to recommend the Cobb Board of Education reinstate the boy in school. The teen was expelled from school automatically along with the others involved in the threatening calls.

No formal action was taken against the teen and the charges were according to Judge Ravan “being held in abeyance at the request of Solicitor Larry Custer until ‘further inquiry can be made into the circumstances surrounding the case.’”

In the Tuesday, Nov. 23, 1965, paper it was reported that Cobb School Superintendent Jasper Griffin accused Solicitor Custer of sitting back in the prosecution of the teens. Griffin made his comments after a scheduled preliminary hearing for one of the accused was postponed because two investigating officers were unable to answer subpoenas for the hearing.

♦♦♦

More flights were reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 24, 1965, paper as leaving Dobbins Air Force Base in Marietta. The flights, mentioned in last week’sTime Capsule, were airlifting Christmas gifts collected throughout the country to servicemen stationed in Viet Nam.

The first of the flights from the Georgia Air National Guard units departed from Dobbins at the beginning of the week. Three more flights were to come from Savannah’s 165th Air Transport Wing of the Guard and three other flights would depart on Dobbins-based C-97 Globemasters throughout the week.

♦♦♦

The Cobb County Bar Association was reported in the Thursday, Nov. 25, 1965, paper as recommending to the legislative delegation and Cobb commissioners that the Superior Court judges’ county supplement be increased from $3,450 to no less than $8,000 annually. The Economic Committee of the bar association said the additional supplement would bring the judge’s salaries in line with those of Fulton and DeKalb counties.

20 years ago …

It was reported in the Monday, Nov. 20, 1995, paper that U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-east Cobb, appeared on ABC’s “This Week with David Brinkley” in Washington and said that he had made up his mind not to seek the Republican nomination for President in 1996.

He also acknowledged that Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, R-Kansas, was leading the GOP pack after having won a straw poll in Florida. Gingrich was the last credible holdout for the Republicans after retired Gen. Colin Powell announced on Wednesday, Nov. 8, 1995, that he would not enter the fray, but that he would join the Grand Old Party.

♦♦♦

In the Tuesday, Nov. 21, 1995, paper it was reported that just before noon the day before the Cobb County emergency 911 center was flooded with about 120 calls reporting a loud explosion. Fire trucks were dispatched and police were told to be on the lookout.

The sonic boom was not confined to just Cobb County, but people all over Georgia from Chattanooga down to central Georgia. What the callers apparently heard, officials later theorized, was the sonic boom caused by Space Shuttle Atlantis as it passed over the area at about 90,000-feet en route to its safe landing at the Kennedy Space Center on Florida’s east coast just after noon that day.

NASA officials in Florida stopped short of saying that the sonic boom definitely was created by Atlantis, but said the shuttle was the “likely” culprit.

♦♦♦

American Multi-Cinema Inc. was reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 22, 1995, paper as planning to build a movie-goers paradise in Cobb County by spring 1997 that would feature 6,000 seats and 30 screens. The 106,000-square-foot theater, which would be the largest multi-cinema in the Southeast at the time, was to be located at the Kennedy Parkway Interchange and the I-75/I-285 Interchange at Akers Mill Road.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Nov. 19
by Damon_Poirier
November 18, 2015 11:20 AM | 649 views | 0 0 comments | 39 39 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Prohibition, gambling, Lockheed, MARTA, KSU and the Kennedy Interchange.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Nov. 19, 1915, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier it was reported on the new Prohibition law and said that – “Georgia is going to be so dry after May 1, 1916, that you will violate the law if you even look like you want a drink.”

The new law prohibited anyone from buying more than two quarts in a month and the purchase had to be registered with the county ordinary. It also made it a misdemeanor to sell a newspaper or any other publication containing a liquor advertisement or post up a sign on a bill board.

♦♦♦

The bottom half of the front page was taken up by an ad for Lee & DuPre’s “Quitting Business Sale.” The store, located at the west side of Marietta Square, announced that it had decided to “close out our entire stock of Gents’ Furnishings.”

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Nov. 14, 1965, Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that Assistant Solicitor General Ben F. Smith warned that merchants who were sponsoring prizes in giveaway contests were violating Georgia’s lottery law. Smith said that he had “ordered the crackdown to keep the county free of organized gambling.”

♦♦♦

A second story in that edition announced that the Defense Department, conceding the possibility there was an advance leak of information, was investigating the recent announcement of a $2 billion aircraft contract awarded to Lockheed Aircraft Corp. The Pentagon confirmed that it was conducting an inquiry into the possible premature release of the contract for the C-5A.

♦♦♦

The new Lockheed Hercules Commercial Airfreighter was reported in the Monday, Nov. 15, 1965, paper as being scheduled to begin a three-week, 25,000-mile demonstration tour on Monday, Nov. 29, 1965, of the African nations of Angola, Zambia, Tanzania, Mozambique, Ethiopia, Sudan, Libya and Nigeria.

♦♦♦

The Cobb County legislative delegation was reported in the Tuesday, Nov. 16, 1965, paper as having ruled out a new referendum on whether the county would participate in the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Program, now known as MARTA.

Reps. Ben Jordan, Bob Howard and Hugh McDaniell and Sen. Kyle Yancy said they would not approve legislation calling for a new vote. Reps. Joe Mack Wilson and Jack Henderson along with Sen. Ed Kendrick said they would approve a new vote if other members concurred.

The following day, in the Wednesday, Nov. 17, 1965, paper, Marietta Mayor Howard Atherton blamed defeat of Rapid Transit Referendum on “perpetual ‘outs’ and soreheads.” He also called the delegation’s refusal to call a new vote in 1966 as “unrealistic.”

Meanwhile, Lee Gilbert, executive vice president of the Cobb Chamber of Commerce, said his organization would create a committee in early 1966 to “make a thorough study of the pros and cons of rapid transit.”

♦♦♦

Also in the Wednesday, Nov. 17, 1965, paper it was reported that construction was to begin within 10 days on the Judicial building of Cobb County’s new courthouse complex after the awarding of a low bid contract of $962,538 to Marietta Construction Co.

Cobb voters in July 1965 approved $3.45 million in bonds for a two-building complex to be located behind the then-current courthouse.

Each of the buildings were to have four floors, a basement, a storage area above the top floor and contain 66,900-square feet of floor space. The then-modern design called for a granite exterior around the first floor and light brick panels above the granite with marble trim.

♦♦♦

The Cobb County Juvenile Detention Home and five county public schools were reported in the Thursday, Nov. 18, 1965, paper as being evacuated after a telephoned bomb threat. This incident came on the heels of the bomb threats mentioned in my column last week and the arson that destroyed Smyrna’s R.L. Osborne Junior High School in my Sept. 25 column.

♦♦♦

Dr. Horace W. Sturgis, president of Kennesaw Junior College – which became today’s Kennesaw State University, was quoted in the Friday, Nov. 19, 1965, paper as saying at a speech to the Marietta Kiwanis Club that he doubted the campus would be completed by fall 1966. Sturgis said the recently ended steel strike and bad weather were to blame.

♦♦♦

Another story in that paper reported that the 116th Air Transport Wing of the Georgia Air National Guard at Dobbins Air Force Base in Marietta was to begin a series of flights in Saigon in order to deliver community Christmas gifts and packages to American servicemen in Viet Nam.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, Nov. 13, 1995, paper it was reported that Cobb commissioners would probably pull the plug on Chairman Bill Byrne’s monthly “Speaking of Cobb” television show when they adopt new guidelines designed to keep the county’s government-access cable channel from becoming a “political showcase” for elected officials. Byrne called the TV-23 proposal “a slap in the face” because he had been the driving force behind creating the channel.

♦♦♦

The sensational year-long O.J. Simpson trial was reported in the Tuesday, Nov. 14, 1995, paper as having been the prompt for lots of public debate over television cameras inside courtrooms. The debate was expected to find its way to the floor of the Georgia General Assembly via State Rep. Randy Sauder, R-Smyrna, who announced that he would introduce a bill aimed at keeping electronic media out of the state courts mainly to prevent the media frenzy that occurred during the Simpson case.

♦♦♦

A team of three metro Atlanta construction companies were reported in the Saturday, Nov. 18, 1995, paper as being the low bidders for the Kennedy Interchange, which was listed as “one of the most ambitious road building projects in Cobb County history.” With the low bid of $71,441,103, the team of Lilburn-based Shepherd Construction Co., Dacula-based E.R. Snell Contractors Inc. and Rogers Bridge Co. of Atlanta won the contract.

The bid-letting culminated more than a decade of planning and effort by the Cumberland/Galleria area business leaders who said the project would improve traffic flow in the crowded Platinum Triangle, an area which will now feature SunTrust Park – the new baseball stadium for the Atlanta Braves.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Nov. 12
by Damon_Poirier
November 12, 2015 12:00 PM | 765 views | 0 0 comments | 46 46 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at bomb scares, a football game fight, slain Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and the Olympic Torch.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Nov. 12, 1915, edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier it was reported that “Jim” Brumby was elected Mayor of Marietta by a vote of 490 to 75 in the primary election.

In Ward 1, former councilman and mayor, J.J. Black won his post with 69 votes to C.C. Byrd’s 60 votes. In Ward 2, George V. Welsh, who entered the race at the last minute, won his post with 76 votes to B.A. Osborn’s 40 votes. In Ward 4, “Tom” Wallace beat incumbent councilman John Black by 97 votes to 8.

Wards 3, 5 and 6 had no opposition and ushered in J.H. Groves, M.D. Hodges and Virgil McCleskey, respectively.

♦♦♦

50 years ago …

On the heels of the arson at R.L. Osborne Junior High School in Smyrna, which was reported in my Sept. 25 column, there was an outbreak of bomb threats made against Cobb County schools.

In the Sunday, Nov. 7, 1965, Marietta Daily Journal, a bomb scare was reported at Osborne High School, but police did not find a bomb. Two days later, on Tuesday, Nov. 9, 1965, another telephoned bomb threat was made against McEachern. Later in the week, on Thursday, Nov. 11, 1965, two more bomb scares were reported against South Cobb and Sprayberry.

The next day, on Friday, Nov. 12, 1965, four teenage boys were taken into custody by the Cobb County Sheriff’s Department in connection with the bomb threats made against the schools. Two of the boys, who were under 17, were turned over to the Juvenile Detention Home, while the other two older boys were released on a $1,000 bond.

♦♦♦

A Marietta police officer was reported in the Sunday, Nov. 7, 1965, paper as having been injured during the Sprayberry-Rossville football game while attempting to break up a fight between officials of the game and fans from Rossville.

The Marietta Police department reported that the officer had been knocked to the ground from behind and then hit in the mouth with either a “stick or flashlight” that caused a wound requiring about a dozen stitches. The attacker, identified as an “older man,” got away even after a group of Sprayberry fans had chased him down.

The unrest came after Rossville, which had been undefeated for nine games, lost to Sprayberry by 13 to 7.

♦♦♦

In Thursday, Nov. 11, 1965, paper, it was reported that in an effort to stem the death rate on Cobb County’s crowded highways, Commission Chairman Ernest Barrett ordered a hefty increase in personnel and equipment for the Cobb County Police Department.

Barrett said 16 new patrolmen, one clerk and two patrol cars will be immediately pressed into service to patrol the county’s more than 1,000 miles of roads. Barrett made the announcement after the fatal accident of a Smyrna man on South Cobb Drive near Oakdale Road, which put Cobb’s traffic death toll at 40 for 1965.

20 years ago …

MDJ columnist Rev. Dr. Nelson Price was reported in the Monday, Nov. 6, 1995, MDJ as marking his 30th anniversary with Roswell Street Baptist Church in Marietta, which was described as the largest and most influential church in Cobb County. Dr. Price, who became the church’s pastor in 1965, witnessed the congregation’s numbers grow from 2,000 to nearly 10,000 and led the expansion of the church’s influence with daily radio broadcasts and weekly television broadcasts that had an estimated audience of 16 million worldwide.

♦♦♦

It was reported in the Tuesday, Nov. 7, 1995, paper that a shaken world said its goodbyes to slain Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who was assassinated three days earlier at a pro-peace rally in Tel Aviv. The host of world leaders attending his funeral at Mount Herzi cemetery featured dozens of dignitaries from the Arab world who put aside their most fundamental differences with Israel to attend his funeral.

The confessed assassin told a judge that he made a “cold-hearted” decision to kill the prime minister to stop the peace process. The assassin was apparently part of a group that opposed an agreement – forged by Rabin and PLO leader Yasser Arafat – to give Palestinians land on the West Bank.

Shawn Stiel of north Cobb, a former Israeli soldier/head of Rabin’s security force and owner of his own executive protection company in Atlanta, said that the assassin “looked like the prime minister’s limo driver.”

Stiel also said, during an interview from his 32nd floor office in the IBM building, that the festive atmosphere at the rally might have caused security forces to let their guard down.

♦♦♦

A second story in that edition reported that the controversy over the proposed Olympic torch going through Cobb had heated up again among gay-rights activists. Jon Ivan Weaver, an activist, said that he had planned to issue a call for a weekend of national protests against ACOG because of “insider information,” which guaranteed that the Olympic torch would go through Cobb County for the 1996 Olympic Games.

Weaver and fellow activist Pat Hussain headed Olympics Out of Cobb, which was a gay-rights group that formed in 1994 and successfully lobbied ACOG to pull Olympic volleyball from the Cobb Galleria Centre in reaction to the Cobb Commissioner’s Aug. 10, 1993 anti-gay resolution. The group disbanded after ACOG shifted volleyball to Athens, but sprang back to life in July when ACOG President Billy Payne said the Olympic torch might go through Cobb.

The controversy temporarily subsided within a week when ACOG executives said they wouldn’t make a decision until spring 1996 on the torch’s route. But, it sprang back to life in the last few days as Weaver obtained supposed insider information on the route.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Nov. 5
by Damon_Poirier
November 06, 2015 12:45 PM | 754 views | 0 0 comments | 46 46 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at large vegetables, vandalism, a KKK probe, the Atlanta Braves and bilingualism.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Nov. 5, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier it was reported that the Central Division of the Cobb County Sunday School Association held its first rally at New Salem Church. There were five divisions in the county – Northern/Acworth Division, Eastern/Roswell Division, Western/Powder Springs Division, Southern/Smyrna Division and Central/Marietta Division.

The rally was reported as filling the church with 350 to 400 people.

L.C. Baldwin of Marietta, the president of the Central Division, planned the rally and Walter L. Abbot of Acworth, the president of the Cobb County Sunday School Association, was the first speaker. Abbot spoke on the association’s plans to develop the county to the gold star standard of efficiency.

♦♦♦

Another front page story reported that the Cobb County Corn Club for boys and the Cobb County Canning Club for girls met at the courthouse to exhibit the results of their labors. Col. John F. Cheney and Judge Fred Morris each made an address dispensing advice and encouragement to the youths.

Congressman Gordon Lee, who was on the agricultural committee in Congress and a patron of corn clubs, also addressed the clubs and said that while he thought his own county had the best corn club in the state, Cobb County had the largest corn club in his district.

♦♦♦

E.W. Thomas, who lived on R.F.D. Route 5, was reported on Page 2 of that edition as having dug up a sweet potato that weighed nine pounds and three ounces.

50 years ago …

In the Friday, Oct. 29, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that someone came out on Claymore Drive late the night before and painted black stripes from an aerosol can along the sides of about 12 cars parked on the south side of the street.

♦♦♦

From down in Newnan, former Gov. Ellis Arnall officially announced in the Sunday, Oct. 31, 1965 paper that he would be a candidate for the Governor of Georgia in the 1966 election.

He was quoted as saying that he was “developing an effective campaign in every county and city.” Arnall also said in his announcement that he had thus far visited 64 Georgia counties, 103 Georgia cities and towns and had delivered 81 speeches.

♦♦♦

A spokesman for the House UnAmerican Activities Committee was reported in the Tuedsay, Nov. 2, 1965 paper as having indicated that the panel was going to cover more ground in its probe of a former Mableton resident who allegedly had dealt in the supply of dynamite to fellow Klansmen.

The committee presented evidence the day before showing that the man, who had lived in Mableton in 1961 but later moved to Macon, furnished electric blasting caps to a KKK member from Alabama in early September 1964. During the KKK investigation, the committee did not pursue the allegation any further in its interrogation of the man, but shifted the focus to his role as a leading official in Georgia Klan activities dating back to the early 1950s.

The man was one of eight Georgians called to the stand as the investigation entered its ninth day.

♦♦♦

Also in that paper, a front page photograph showed M.C. Mines Sr. and his tomato plant which was 23-feet tall. The Stephens Lumber Company employee said he was having to use a ladder to pick his tomatoes.

♦♦♦

Cobb County Commission Chairman Ernest Barrett was reported in the Thursday, Nov. 4, 1965 paper as saying that he had received a letter from Fulton County Commission Chairman James H. Aldredge saying that Fulton would agree not to tear down the Powers Ferry Road Bridge over the Chattahoochee River if Cobb would agree to pay one half of the maintenance cost of the bridge.

Earlier, Fulton commissioners had announced the 60-year-old bridge would be torn down. Barrett said Fulton did not have the authority to tear down the bridge, but could, under an old statute, levy a toll on the one-lane bridge. Barrett was reported as saying he would recommend to the Cobb Commission that Aldredge’s proposal be accepted.

20 years ago …

In the Sunday, Oct. 29, 1995, paper, it was reported that 30 years of pent-up frustration ended when the Atlanta Braves fans erupted into a celebration that was four post-seasons in the making with the Braves’ 1-0 win over the Cleveland Indians. The crowd of 50,000-plus exploded in a roar that nearly drowned out the boom of fireworks shooting over Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium.

Rightfielder David Justice, whose solo homer was the only score of the game, had earlier chastised Atlanta fans for a lack of enthusiasm after seeing the crowds at Jacobs Field in Cleveland. Fans said the World Series win would purge Atlanta of its former “Loserville” status and any comparison with the National Football League’s Buffalo Bills, who lost four straight Super Bowls.

Two days later, in the Tuesday, Oct. 31, 1995 paper, it was reported that downtown Atlanta traffic was jammed up for the Braves parade and phone lines were jammed at the high schools in Cobb County as parents called in to say their children were out sick – with Braves fever. Throughout the morning, attendance offices – especially at the high school level – were bustling with activity.

An estimated 4,000 students, or about 20-percent of the 21,600 high school students in the county, were missing from school, which was double the number that was normally out on a Monday.

♦♦♦

Another story in the Tuesday, Oct. 31, 1995 paper, reported that on the day when citizens of bilingual Quebec were voting on whether to secede from Canada, U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-east Cobb, warned of the dangers of a bilingual nation.

“We should insist on English as a common language. It’s what binds us together,” Rep. Gingrich was quoted as saying in an address at a technology and business forum at Georgia Tech.

Gingrich said he was supporting legislation in Congress which would make English the official language of the United States.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Oct. 22
by Damon_Poirier
October 23, 2015 04:15 PM | 955 views | 0 0 comments | 61 61 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at bombs, an incinerator, Social Security, Lake Allatoona, Lockheed and Microsoft.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Oct. 22, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier a pair of deaths was reported.

The first was about the death of a 21-year-old Kennesaw man who was killed in an explosion in the new plant belonging to the Tennessee Coal, Iron and Railroad Company in Fairfield, Alabama.

The second was about a 22-year-old black man, who lived on Wright Street in Marietta, who was found dead “in the railroad cut at Campbells, about a mile beyond Smyrna.” It was believed that the man had caught a train in Marietta to steal a ride to Atlanta, fell off and was then crushed beneath the train.

♦♦♦

Another story in that edition reported that J.C. Buchanan, the district manager for the Atlanta suburban district of the Bell telephone company, came to Marietta to introduce the city’s new telephone manager, R.M. Wade of Madison. Wade, the brother of Judge Peyton L. Wade of the Court of Appeals in Atlanta, was also to be the superintendent of the telephone exchanges in Acworth, Smyrna and Woodstock. He and his wife were reported as boarding at the Whitlock House.

♦♦♦

The bottom half of the front page was taken up with an ad for products being sold at the Anderson Brothers Company. Some of the products listed were The Weyenberg Shoe, John Deere wagons and buggies, Syracuse plows and Oliver Chilled Plows and implements.

50 years ago …

A homemade bomb was reported in the Monday, Oct. 18, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal as being discovered at South Cobb High School. Investigating deputies found a one-gallon can of gasoline about half full with two wires attached to the can and coupled to the water line. The bomb was dismantled before any damage occurred.

♦♦♦

A second story in that edition reported that construction of a $3 million Cobb County incinerator was expected to begin in 1966. The incinerator, with a 20-foot tall smoke stack, was to be located 500 yards east of the county dump near Powder Springs Road. The dump was expected to be abandoned when the incinerator was completed.

Plans for the incinerator were in the final stages of completion. The Hensley-Schmidt engineering firm was reported as working on a system to prevent air and steam pollution that might arise from the incinerator. The firm was hoping to have the system ready for State Health Department approval within two months. Once approval was given, the county was then expected to open the construction bidding process.

♦♦♦

In the Tuesday, Oct. 19 1965 paper, it was reported that a telephoned bomb threat caused 475 students to be evacuated from the Park Street Elementary School. The caller told the switchboard at the Cobb County Board of Education that a bomb at the school would go off in a few minutes. Marietta police and fire departments were alerted and conducted a 35-minute search, but did not find any evidence of a bomb.

♦♦♦

Also that day, it was reported that “a tiny gray-haired Confederate widow from Kennesaw became the first Cobb County resident to apply for Medicare” when the Social Security service center opened.

Georgia Carter, 93, came down to the Social Security office in person to sign up for basic hospital insurance, which was free, and for medical insurance, which cost her $3 a month. Eunice Shelnutt, field service director for the Social Security office, who drove Carter to Marietta for the signing, reported the elderly woman was as “excited as a child going to see Santa Claus.”

♦♦♦

Cobb County Police Chief E.H. Burruss was pictured in the Friday, Oct. 22, 1965 paper showing off the county’s new paddy wagon. Burruss said the wagon would be used “to transport prisoners from the point of arrest to the county jail and would, therefore, free patrol cars to continue their regular beats.”

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, Oct. 17, 1995 paper, it was reported that a man and woman wanted in the slaying of a female Life College student from Smyrna were caught by authorities in Toronto, Canada. The duo was arrested by Toronto police after trying to pawn stolen merchandise. Marietta police were said to have tracked the pair to Ohio, where they reportedly robbed the man’s mother before making their way to Canada.

The following day, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 1995, it was reported that authorities had said Cobb County’s frequent pursuit of the death penalty in murder cases would likely complicate the extradition of the duo. While it would take several days before extradition warrants would be issued to bring the duo back to Marietta for prosecution, local authorities believed that Canada’s lack of capital punishment and the country’s national opposition sentiment would be an obstacle.

♦♦♦

Lake Allatoona was reported in the Wednesday, Oct. 18, 1995 paper as not going on the auction block in the name of federal deficit reduction as recent rumors had alleged.

The news came from U.S. Rep. Nathan Deal, R-Gainesville, who was an adamant opponent of the proposal by House Resource Committee. The committee was reported as having wanted to sell federal dams and reservoirs in the South to the highest bidder. Deal and other House members that were opposed to the proposal met with House Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-East Cobb, to discuss the negative effects of the sale.

A month before, Lake Allatoona had been included on a list of 23 federally-owned properties in the South – nine of them in Georgia – that would be auctioned off to raise money to help meet the Republican goal of balancing the budget by 2002. All of the sites were designed in part to serve as hydroelectric facilities to help supply power to Georgia’s rural areas.

♦♦♦

A crowd of about 1,000 were reported in the Thursday, Oct. 19, 1995 paper as getting a first-hand look at Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems’ first C-130J Hercules as it rolled out of its hangar. The new plane – which was the firm’s 2,150th Hercules and being delivered to Britain’s Royal Air Force in late 1996 after a year-long test and evaluation program – emerged from the giant hangar as the Royal Air Force Pipers & Drummers began playing, leading it onto the tarmac.

♦♦♦

In the Friday, Oct. 20, 1995 paper, it was reported that one day before the opening of a computer super show, software giant Microsoft pulled out of the exhibition at the Cobb Galleria Centre, citing the reason being Cobb’s resolution condemning the gay lifestyle. Microsoft was to have a 600-square foot booth at the show.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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Hurricane Opal
by Damon_Poirier
October 13, 2015 12:00 PM | 977 views | 0 0 comments | 65 65 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Twenty years ago last week, the remains of violent Hurricane Opal passing through Cobb County were reported in the Friday, Oct. 6, 1995 through Sunday, Oct. 8, 1995 Marietta Daily Journal papers. The worst of the hurricane, which had thrashed the Florida Panhandle with 144 mph wind gusts, passed through Cobb County between midnight and 1 a.m. on Thursday, Oct. 5, 1995 and caused one death along with lots of damage.

While it had been downgraded to a tropical storm before reaching the county, Opal still packed a heavy punch with 69 mph winds -- the highest recorded for the month of October in 50 years. The storm was reported as having produced the lowest-ever barometric pressure – 29.18 inches – in October, according to meteorologists at the Dobbins Air Force Base weather station.

The damage from the storm resulted in Gov. Zell Miller declaring a state of emergency for Cobb and 44 other Georgia counties hit by the storm.

Marietta

The hardest hit areas in Marietta were the west side of town where dozens of streets became impassable due to several old oak trees that fell and took down power lines. City crews, however, were reported as having the roads back to passable by midday Thursday.

The storm claimed the life of a man when a tree crashed down on top of his pickup on Whitlock Avenue in Marietta at 5 a.m. Another man was also reported as being hit by a falling tree out on Gramling Street, but he was listed as not being seriously injured.

Marietta firefighters received 111 calls between midnight and 8 a.m. Thursday and had to call in extra personnel to handle the heavy load. The average number of fire and rescue calls during a 24-hour period was only 20. Marietta police were also said to have responded to 345 calls during the same period.

One call to emergency workers was for the fire that broke out at the Rib Ranch BBQ & Smokehouse restaurant at 2063 Canton Road in north Marietta. The fire began at 5 a.m. and resulted in a total loss of the family-owned restaurant. The fire was believed to have been caused by either a lightning strike or an electrical failure.

In downtown Marietta, it was reported the Marietta City Council Chambers at City Hall had become flooded. City workers said it would take a full day for the floor to become dry enough for the room to be used again for meetings.

More than 23,000 residents in the city were listed as being without power at 6 a.m. Thursday. However, 85 percent had power restored by 10 a.m. that morning. Cobb Electrical Membership Corp. reported between 30,000 and 35,000 of its Marietta customers were also without at 6 a.m. By mid-afternoon, between 7,000 and 15,000 were still without power.

Georgia Power Co., which served about 11,000 people in Cobb County, said that Opal “caused the third largest number of outages in the history of Georgia Power, behind the ‘Storm of the Century’ in March 1993, which left 570,918 customers without service, and the tornadoes that hit north Georgia in February 1990, leaving about 500,000 people without power.”

Smyrna/Vinings

The worst flooding happened along the Chattahoochee River where it passed through Vinings and east Cobb along Columns Drive, which was closed as three feet of water washed across the asphalt in some places. Schools buses were used to help evacuate some residents in the area. Cobb fire officials also estimated that about a half-dozen homes along Cochise Drive, which ran along the river in Vinings off Paces Ferry Road, could become flooded.

The Cobb Ranger Department’s boat patrol was called into the area to evacuate those trapped by the flooding, and an emergency shelter was set up at the East Cobb Government Center on Lower Roswell Road. Neither was used as the waters began to recede by 7:30 a.m. Thursday.

The area along Forest Drive near Atlanta Road in Smyrna was also reported as being badly damaged by winds and that hundreds of fallen trees left many of the main roads there impassable.

At 11 a.m., police reported drivers on South Cobb Drive, Windy Hill Road and Concord Road were refusing to treat powerless intersections as four-way stops, and were driving straight through the few working red lights.

Mableton

Then-State Rep. Roy Barnes and his family were reported as weathering the storm well, but Barnes ran into trouble while heading into work that morning. Driving down Brookwood in downtown Atlanta, Barnes had a tree fall in front of his new Ford Explorer. Attempting to stop, Barnes skidded on pine straw that had littered the road and ran over the trunk of the tree, but wasn’t hurt.

Northwest Cobb

Residents in Acworth, Kennesaw and northwestern Cobb County were spared any major damage, but all of Acworth’s power customers were without electricity from 1 to 4 a.m. Thursday. Acworth had every available repair crew working before dawn and throughout the day. Acworth also requested additional help from the Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, which responded with two crews that arrived in the afternoon.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Oct. 8
by Damon_Poirier
October 09, 2015 03:15 PM | 1054 views | 0 0 comments | 67 67 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at The Strand Theater, Lockheed, Dobbins, turnips, the KKK, Newt Gingrich and O.J. Simpson.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Oct. 8, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported that Acworth city officials voted to install a new “water works and electric lights” system. The previous system was expected to be abandoned entirely for the “very best and most modern machinery” to be installed.

♦♦♦

There was a front page story announcing that Jim Brumby was running for Mayor of Marietta. Some of the items that Brumby was cited as being in favor of were open city council meetings, safe-guarding the finances of the city so it “will be impossible for any administration to spend more money than the City’s income during the life of the administration” and paying policemen a monthly salary and abolishing the fee system.

♦♦♦

The entire second page of the paper was taken up by a grand opening ad for what was Marietta’s first Strand theater, which was billed as “The Strand Theater – Marietta’s Movie House Beautiful – The Home of Great Feature Pictures.” In 1935, a second Strand Theater, which recently celebrated its 80th anniversary, was opened at the corner of North Park Square and Cherokee streets.

The ad announced a week of programs for the opening. The schedule was Marguerite Clark in “Helene of the North” on Oct. 11, Theda Bara in “The Devil’s Daughter” on Oct. 12, Blanche Sweet in “Stolen Goods” on Oct. 13, Laura Hope Crews in “Blackbirds” on Oct. 14, Anita Stewart and Earle Williams in “The Juggernaut” on Oct. 15 and Robert Edeson in “The Girl I Left Behind Me” on Oct. 16.

Admission to the shows was five-cents and 10-cents.

50 years ago …

The Defense Department was reported in the Sunday, Oct. 3, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal as having been asked to approve funds for construction of a massive cloverleaf interchange to ease Lockheed-Georgia Company traffic congestion at the intersection of South Cobb Drive and Fairground Street.

Cobb Rep.-elect Jack Henderson, representatives from Lockheed and the Air Force watched as Col. Ralph H. Harrington, the Air Force representative at the Marietta facility, signed the official request seeking money from the federal government’s Access Defense (AD) Program – which permits federal construction of access routes to defense installations.

If approved, then federal funds would pay for the entire interchange and be built by the State Highway Department and the U.S. Bureau of Public Roads. The cost of the interchange was believed to be $500,000.

♦♦♦

In the Monday, Oct. 4, 1965 paper it was reported Sen. Strom Thurmond (R-South Carolina) had called for an investigation into the awarding of the C-5A contract to Lockheed-Georgia. Thurmond charged that evidence indicated word of the award may have leaked out ahead of time, allowing speculation in the stocks of the three aircraft companies vying for the contract.

Thurmond, the ranking Republican member of the Senate Banking and Currency Securities Subcommittee, wrote to Manuel F. Cohen, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), urging him to investigate whether investors trading in the three stocks of the leading contenders had any prior notice of the contract decision.

♦♦♦

The Federal Aviation Administration was reported in the Tuesday, Oct. 5, 1965 paper as having notified Marietta Mayor Howard Atherton that the Department of the Air Force had gone on record as opposing the proposed conversion of Dobbins Air Force Base into a joint military-civilian operation. Atherton received the three-page letter from the FAA, which listed numerous technical reasons for the Air Force’s rejection of the plan.

♦♦♦

Also that day, it was reported on the front page that – “If times get hard, Mariettans can always eat in the square – if they can get there before the mowers.” The tongue-in-cheek story reported that “strange little plants” spotted on the Square by Mayor Howard Atherton and reported to City Manager Walter Brown were not weeds but turnips. It was discovered that the final half-sack of grass seed used on the Square had been “watered” with turnip seed.

♦♦♦

A new type of insect was reported in the Thursday, Oct. 7, 1965 paper as buzzing around the county. The “parasite wasp” looked exactly like a yellow jacket but had a milder sting. County Agent Ernest Wester said that he had received reports from all over the county about the “sudden influx of yellow jackets.” He was also reported as saying that a person could brush off one of the wasps without fear of being stung because the insects did not go looking for trouble.

♦♦♦

A second story in that paper reported that no official clearance had been given to the Ku Klux Klan for a proposed rally in the parking lot of the Marietta federal post office.

KKK Grand Dragon Calvin Craig told the Journal the Klan planned to rally and parade in Marietta “to show citizens where we were denied our right of freedom of speech and peaceful assembly.” The comment was in response to the KKK being denied the chance to hold a rally on Marietta Square, which had been mentioned in several previous columns.

Post Master Lindsey Epps said that he had spoken with Craig on the telephone, but had not granted the KKK clearance.

Craig was also quoted as saying that he had received assurance from city manager Walter Brown that he would have a parade-permit. Brown said that he would grant a permit if he had the authority to do so. But, after checking the city’s ordinance, he announced that the city manager only had permission to issue permits to certain organizations and the KKK was not one of those groups listed.

The following day, Friday, Oct. 8, 1965, Postmaster General John A. Gronouski notified the Atlanta regional office of the Post Office Department that the KKK rally was denied permission to meet at the Marietta Post Office.

20 years ago …

A major national magazine was reported in the Monday, Oct. 2, 1995 paper as having published an extensive and highly critical profile of House Speaker Newt Gingrich of east Cobb. Gingrich’s political plans, beliefs and techniques were discussed in the Oct. 9 edition of The New Yorker. The 26-page piece, entitled “The Politics of Perception,” came barely a month after Vanity Fair published a dissection of Gingrich’s personal history and morality.

♦♦♦

In the Wednesday, Oct. 4, 1995 paper, it was reported that Cobb County came to a halt at 1 p.m. the day before to watch the O.J. Simpson murder trial verdict, which acquitted him of murdering his ex-wife, Nicole Brown Simpson, and her friend, Ronald Goldman.

The paper reported that – “Work took a back seat as people clustered around television sets. Government meetings took a break, shoppers set down their bags, schools put learning on hold – even the music stopped at the Taj Mahal as lunch patrons turned their gazes from the nude dancers to the TV.”

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Osborne Junior High School Arson
by Damon_Poirier
September 25, 2015 01:45 PM | 1427 views | 0 0 comments | 80 80 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

Fifty years ago this week, the Marietta Daily Journal reported the destruction of R.L. Osborne Junior High School in Smyrna and the suspicion of arson.

In the Thursday, Sept. 23, 1965 paper, it was reported that the roughly 40-year-old brick junior high school had been completely destroyed by fire and that authorities were dispatched to 52 other school facilities in the area after receiving threats that those structures were also going to be burned.

A mixed force of about 20 firefighting units from all of the county’s fire districts along with units from the cities of Marietta and Smyrna and two trucks from Dobbins Air Force Base in Marietta responded to the call.

Fair Oaks Assistant Fire Chief Edward C. Barrett, one of the first men on the scene, said the “entire inside of the building was burning” when his trucks arrived.

Barrett was also quoted as saying, “We couldn’t have saved the building if we had twice as many trucks and 200 men instead of the 100 that fought the fire.”

An unnamed firefighter said that “the floors were soaked with oil as a dust control measure and this just added to the problem of trying to contain the blaze.”

After the fire broke through the roof, witnesses said that “flames leaped into the air almost a hundred feet.” Heat from the blaze was reported as being felt a block away and that heavy black smoke was everywhere as the firemen fought the fire for over two hours.

The school, built in 1928 and originally called Olive Springs, was one of Cobb County’s oldest schools. Its destruction left 1,730 students temporarily without a school.

The building was estimated at a value of $120,000 although Cobb County Schools Superintendent Jasper Griffin said a new building could not be built for that price. He did, however, say that a clause in the school system’s insurance policy stated a similar building could be erected and that the insurance would cover the costs.

The estimate on the contents within the school were $18,200, but Superintendent Griffin said that there was “no problem of a shortage of books and materials for students at the moment.”

The fire and threats came two weeks after the Cobb County School system had integrated, which was mentioned in my Sept. 11 column.

Before the fire was out at the junior high school, State Fire Marshall Bob Gore, Sheriff Kermit Sanders, Cobb County Police Chief Harris Burruss, GBI agent R.D. Ruff and Chief Deputy Harold Griggs had launched an investigation.

Chief Barrett said that the Cobb Civil Defense unit, commanded by James Ray, and the unit’s ladies auxiliary were on hand throughout the morning and “was responsible for excellent control of traffic and keeping spectators away from danger areas.”

Sheriff’s deputies were also reported in that paper as having found ashes on the desk of a fourth grade teacher’s desk at Milford Elementary School in the Fair Oaks area and officers were investigating break-ins that happened at the Fair Oaks Elementary School the night of Osborne’s fire.

The following day, Friday, Sept. 24, 1965 paper, it was reported that the ninth grade at Osborne was moving to two other junior high schools. Approximately, 50 to 55 ninth graders would go to Nash Junior High and the remaining 275 ninth graders would go to Floyd Junior High. The seventh and eighth grade classes at Osborne were to remain in the part of the school that was still standing for the time being.

While fire officials were still sifting through the damage at Osborne, it was reported that another bomb threat was telephoned into the Hickory Hills School in Marietta. Officers searched that building, but found nothing. The evening before, however, vandals had broken into that school and stole money from the Coca-Cola machine, broke several windows and had scattered papers across the floors.

Investigators were still trying to determine if the bomb threats and break-ins were connected to the Osborne fire.

Later, in the Sunday, Sept. 26, 1965 paper, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) and the Cobb Sheriff’s Office announced that a 16-year-old ninth grade student admitted to setting the fire at Osborne Junior High School. The announcement said that the student told officials that he “just got fed up with school” and decided to burn it down. The student was also quoted as saying that he was “too young to quit” and that he had tried to get “kicked out” without success.

The student said that he threw a lit cigarette in the trash can in the principal’s office the night of the fire after everyone had left the building.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Sept. 17
by Damon_Poirier
September 18, 2015 01:50 PM | 1262 views | 0 0 comments | 83 83 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Lockheed, Cobb Hospital, Dean Rusk, the C-5A, Newt Gingrich, traffic and a train wreck.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Sept. 17, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported that the First National Bank of Marietta was offering to lend Cobb County farmers money on cotton at 6 percent interest. The cotton was to be placed in a large warehouse, centrally located in Marietta, and owned by the bank. The story said that “a very moderate warehouse charge in addition to the interest rate is to be made.”

50 years ago …

Of the 833 draftees sent down to the Atlanta Selective Service Center it was reported in the Sunday, Sept. 12, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal that only 439 were accepted and the remaining 394 were turned down. Half of those rejected were turned down for physical reasons. The rest were rejected because they failed simple Army intelligence tests. The draftees were being selected for induction into the armed forces because of the fighting in Viet Nam.

♦♦♦

Lockheed-Georgia Company and two other aircraft manufacturers received study contracts totaling $750,000 for a new long-range, jet-powered command and control aircraft. Lockheed, the Boeing Co. of Seattle, Washington and Douglas Aircraft Co. of Long Beach, California were each to receive contracts for $250,000.

The new plane was expected to carry a completely automated electronic warning and control system that would make it capable of operating independently or in conjunction with ground-based control and warning environments. The new plane was also supposed to enable Air Defense Command and Tactical Air Command greater versatility in meeting their mission requirements.

♦♦♦

A Marietta businessman was reported in the Wednesday, Sept. 15, 1965 paper as having accused Cobb County of infringing upon his copyright and using a map he prepared for the county under the administration of Cobb’s single commissioner system. Larry Defee accused the county of “taking my property under the color of a contract, depriving me of dominion, possession and control over my property.”

Defee claimed a base map furnished to the engineering firm of Hensley-Schmidt Inc., under Cobb County’s former Commissioner Herbert McCollum to prepare new county zoning maps, was copyrighted and that he was entitled to compensation from the county. The commission adopted a resolution earlier that week to take no action on the matter after County Attorney Fred Bentley informed them he could find no existing contract between Defee and the county.

♦♦♦

Also that day, the federal government was reported as having given final approval for the construction of the new Cobb County General Hospital, which is now known as WellStar Cobb Hospital.

The hospital was to have 167 beds, including 17 for mental patients. The addition of a mental wing was one of the changes to the original hospital plans by the federal Department of Health, Education and Welfare. The hospital was to sit on a hill in a former apple orchard located at Austell and Mulkey roads. It was to be constructed of cream-colored glazed brick and have a blue glazed trim at a cost of $3,780,000.

♦♦♦

Secretary of State Dean Rusk was reported in the Sept. 16, 1965 paper as making a hurried visit to his family home near Woodstock where he lunched and visited with a host of relatives. It was Rusk’s first visit home in four years to Cherokee County.

During his visit, Rusk surveyed the rolling hills around the family home place just off Arnold Mill Road. Then, after a lunch of fried chicken, he visited a nearby cemetery where his great-grandparents, grandparents and other relatives were buried. He also inspected a large old farmhouse that had once been occupied by his grandfather.

♦♦♦

Defense Secretary Robert McNamara was reported in the Friday, Sept. 17, 1965 paper as saying that that the multi-million dollar C-5A airframe contract award that Lockheed-Georgia was competing for would not be made for at least two more weeks.

Lockheed along with the Boeing Co. and Douglas Aircraft Co. were seeking the contract. McNamara said the three bids were still under review by the Air Force Source Selection Committee.

Originally, the Defense Department indicated that the winner would be announced on Sept. 1. When that date passed without a decision, several rumors persisted that the winner would be announced on Sept. 17 after the close of the New York Stock Exchange.

20 years ago …

In the Sept. 11, 1995 paper, it was reported that east Cobb’s House Speaker Newt Gingrich urged retired Gen. Colin Powell to give up any idea of an independent presidential candidacy, saying that having a candidate outside the current party system was “a joke” that could lead to disaster.

Rep. Gingrich, in an interview on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” also revealed some details of the GOP’s plans to restore fiscal integrity to Medicare, including a proposal to apply means-testing to couples earning more than $125,000.

Gen. Powell, in his new autobiography, had said that he was not comfortable with either party “and the time may be ripe for the rise of a third party to represent the political center in America,” but he made no commitment to lead such a party.

♦♦♦

A major morning rush-hour traffic snarl in Cobb County the day before was reported in the Wednesday, Sept. 13, 1995 paper as being blamed on test messages flashing across a new electronic sign placed above Interstate 75 by the Department of Transportation to help move traffic.

Testing of the sign just south of Delk Road had begun late the Monday before and was supposed to end before the Tuesday morning commuter surge toward the perimeter, but the sign was left on by a contractor. The result was a mammoth traffic jam by the middle of rush hour, complete with stalls and minor wrecks as commuters slowed to read the sign, backing traffic up I-75 to Chastain Road.

♦♦♦

A spectacular collision between a train and a tractor-trailer truck in Powder Springs was reported in the Saturday, Sept. 16, 1995 paper as having closed the city’s main thoroughfare for five hours as emergency crews worked to clean up the wreckage and a diesel fuel spill.

No one was injured in the 9 a.m. crash, which occurred after the truck’s flatbed trailer “bottomed out” and got stuck on tracks in the path of a Norfolk Southern train, which thrust the truck more than 1,500-feet down the tracks.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of Sept. 10
by Damon_Poirier
September 11, 2015 11:30 AM | 1319 views | 0 0 comments | 87 87 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a film, Dixie Highway, a stolen body, desegregation, Newt Gingrich and Dr. Louis Farrakhan.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Sept. 10, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported that Marietta was going to be represented “in the great Georgia Booster Film,” which was being made to advertise the state of Georgia.

It said that “moving picture people” were expected to reach Marietta the following Wednesday afternoon but they had been forced to stop in Rome in order to “attend a barbecue that was given to the ‘Seeing North Georgia’ tour path finders.” Scenes expected to be taken in the area were the Marietta Square, the Marietta Courthouse, the Kennesaw Marble Company and the Hereford cattle at J.T. Anderson’s farm, which were mentioned in last week’s column.

The film was expected to be shown all over the country.

♦♦♦

Another story reported that the Dixie Highway, now known in Cobb County as Old Highway 41, was expected to be finished in the near future. The road, first planned in 1914, was to connect the Midwest with the South.

The article said that the road was “in first class shape for a long time except” at the point “just beyond Smyrna to the Fulton County line.” County commissioners were said to be surveying “a route from Atlanta Road at Judge Atkinson’s home across to the Vinings Road.”

The reason for going out on the Vinings Road was said “to force the tourists using this highway to enter Atlanta over Peachtree Road which will show the finest residence section in the state.”

♦♦♦

An ad, striped across the bottom of the front page in that paper, called attention to a sale by Marietta’s T.L. Wallace Clothing Company being held the following day. The top of the ad read, “The Official Style Censor commands you to ‘Feed that Straw to the Cows.’”

The ad was referring to feeding old straw hats to cows as an excuse to buy a new hat during the sale. There were hats with colors in carbon grey, mint green, marine blue, gun metal and black that priced from $2 to $3.50 with Stetsons for $4 to $5.

♦♦♦

It was also reported in that edition that Gov. Nathaniel E. Harris had named Col. Fred Morris as a member of his staff with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel. This was the second time Col. Morris had served the Governor’s Office, having been a member of Gov. Michael Hoke Smith’s staff with the same rank.

♦♦♦

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Sept. 5, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that metro police officers and GBI agents were pressing their search for an ex-convict that was believed to have stolen the body of his “friend” from a Hapeville funeral home earlier in the week.

The deceased’s body, who was mentioned in last week’s column as the victim in an Austell murder case, was reported as found beside a logging road in Jasper County, near Shady Dale. The body was found by a black tenant farmer who was hunting for muscadines. The farmer said he found the body lying face up in a clearing atop a small rise, with its hands folded across the chest.

♦♦♦

A 3-year-old boy and a 29-year-old man were reported killed in the Tuesday, Sept. 7, 1965 paper in a Cobb County car wreck. The two deaths were also listed as being part of the then-highest Labor Day weekend accidental death toll in the nation’s history. In state, there were 15 people who died that weekend, but across the nation there were 700 people who died in accidents.

♦♦♦

A second story in that paper reported that registration was completed peacefully at Cobb County schools “as they implemented a desegregation plan for the first time in history.” The county schools reported no incidents as they began the first full day of school with an expected 40 black students registering in the previously all-white schools.

The breakdown of black students in the schools were listed as 9 at Campbell High School, 7 at McEachern High School, 6 at North Cobb High School, 5 at Bernard Awtrey Junior High School, 9 at Richard H. Nash Junior High School and one student at Hawthorne Elementary School.

The following day, Wednesday, Sept. 8, 1965, there was a story that reported 38 black students had requested and received transfers to previously all-white schools within the Marietta City Schools system. The breakdown of students was listed as 11 at Marietta High School, 18 at Allgood, 3 at Keith, 8 at Park Street and one student at the Waterman Street schools.

♦♦♦

In the Friday, Sept. 10, 1965 paper, the mysterious case of a 26-year old Alabama native who was “connected” with the Federal Government and about to be extradited to Alabama on a fugitive warrant was reported.

The man was said to have escaped from the barracks at Kilby Prison in Montgomery, Alabama in May 1964. He was then arrested the next day in Miami, Florida, but released a month later because Alabama failed to extradite him.

After his release in Miami, the man was said to have become an “informer” for the U.S. Secret Service and “according to highly reliable sources, was instrumental in the arrest of several persons connected with a counterfeit ring.” Following those arrests, “he was ‘sent’ to the Atlanta area” until those individuals went to trial.

During that time he worked for a finance company for about three months early in 1965 and then applied for a private detective license, which required fingerprinting by the Smyrna police. A routine background check of the fingerprints by the FBI revealed Alabama’s fugitive warrant.

20 years ago …

East Cobb’s House Speaker Newt Gingrich was quoted in the Tuesday, Sept. 5, 1995 paper as saying that his decision to run for president hinged in part on what retired Gen. Colin Powell decided about his own political ambitions. Powell and Rep. Gingrich had been mentioned as “possible” candidates in the 1996 race.

♦♦♦

In the Saturday, Sept. 9, 1995 paper, it was reported that controversial Muslim leader Dr. Louis Farrakhan stopped by the state Capitol “to give black legislators a private pep talk, but ran into some unexpected opposition” from state Rep. Mitchell Kaye (R-east Cobb). Kaye was said to have taken a team of three Georgia Building Authority police officers and the capitol press to help force the meeting into the open.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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