Georgia News Roundup
September 24, 2013 10:45 AM | 898 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Georgia transit agency planning emergency training

ATLANTA (AP) — Atlanta public transit officials say they're planning to hold emergency training exercises at a local subway station.

Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority officials say the agency will hold its annual emergency training sessions Oct. 5 and 6 at the College Park train station, south of Atlanta.

Officials say the exercise will also serve as a test location for federal agencies, and will give MARTA police, staff and other emergency responders to address a simulated crisis — like a terrorist attack, pandemic or natural disaster.

Agency officials say they're planning to hold the exercises either at the end of the day or after service has ended to minimize impacts on commuters. Some streets will be closed near the station after 11 p.m. Oct. 5.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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Eastern Georgia woman bitten by rabid fox

STATESBORO, Ga. (AP) — A Statesboro woman says she's undergoing two weeks' worth of shots after being bitten by a rabid fox.

Cathy Riccio told WTOC-TV a fox tried to attack her dog last week and when she tried intervening, the fox bit her on the ankle. Riccio says she and her dog tried running from the fox and it chased her up the deck and to the door.

Riccio's husband shot at the fox and nicked its ear before it ran away.

Bulloch County Animal Control officials searched and didn't find the fox, but did find a den in the woods near her home.

Riccio says her husband fatally shot the fox when they saw it a second time. A local veterinarian tested the fox and determined it had rabies.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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Police search for suspect in Alpharetta shooting

ALPHARETTA, Ga. (AP) — Police are searching for a suspect after a shooting in the suburban Atlanta community of Alpharetta.

WXIA-TV reports that the shooting happened shortly before 4 a.m. Tuesday at the Planter's Ridge apartments off Cumming Highway.

Alpharetta Department of Public Safety spokesman George Gordon said the victim was taken to North Fulton Hospital, and is expected to survive. His name was not released.

Few other details were immediately available early Tuesday.

Information from: WXIA-TV.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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Suburban Atlanta city approves mosque expansion 

ALPHARETTA, Ga. (AP) — The city council in Alpharetta has approved a proposal to expand a mosque.

The Islamic Center of North Fulton, on Rucker Road, has been trying to expand its mosque since 2011.

WGCL-TV reports that the council unanimously approved the proposal in a vote on Monday night.

In 2011, Alpharetta officials decided not to change zoning laws that would have allowed the expansion. Since then, members of the mosque said they've worked with the surrounding neighborhoods and the city to approve their new proposal.

The mosque had 25 members in 1998, and now that number is close to 600 members.

Information from: WGCL-TV.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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Pedestrian struck and killed on highway in Macon 

MACON, Ga. (AP) — Authorities say a pedestrian has been struck and killed in Macon.

Bibb County Coroner Leon Jones said the 25-year-old man was hit by a car around 1:30 a.m. Tuesday on Gray Highway.

Jones tells WMAZ-TV that the victim, Daniel Muhamed, was an employee of the Lake Bridge Hospital on Riverside Drive in Macon.

Few other details on the crash were immediately available.

Information from: WMAZ-TV.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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Wild boars roam streets, scare people near Atlanta 

LITHONIA, Ga. (AP) — Some parents fear sending their children to a school bus stop in an Atlanta suburb, saying wild boars have been spotted roaming in a subdivision.

Taneisha Danner tells WBS-TV that some giant hogs chased her children back into the house. Residents say four boars have been seen wandering through their Lithonia subdivision in DeKalb County and rummaging through trash in that neighborhood.

The Atlanta station, which reports that one boar is as tall as a man's waist, aired video of the animals hanging around the subdivision. Neighbors said they've notified DeKalb County police and animal control authorities.

Police said they planned to contact the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Information from: WSB-TV.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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Convention study on agenda for Gainesville meeting 

GAINESVILLE, Ga. (AP) — The Gainesville City Council is expected to get an update on a study designed to show the feasibility of a new convention center and hotel for the northeast Georgia city.

The Times reports that the study is expected to address several issues, including market demand, economic impact, construction costs and facility operation.

The Gainesville council approved the study to see what options it has to develop a successful event venue that would attract large meetings, conferences and entertainment acts.

In May, the city council awarded the bid for study to consulting firms Key Advisors Inc. and the Bleakly Advisory Group in May.

The council will hear more about the study at its work session on Thursday.

Information from: The Times, http://www.gainesvilletimes.com

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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Signs to direct visitors in Gullah Corridor 

By Bruce Smith, Associated Press

CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Signs will soon be going up directing visitors to sites important to the culture of slave descendants along the sea islands of the Southeast.

The chairman of the Gullah Geechee Heritage Corridor Commission, Ron Daise, tells The Associated Press more than 50 highway signs are being distributed to counties in the corridor reaching from near Jacksonville, N.C., down the coast to south of Jacksonville, Fla.

In the coming weeks banners designating the corridor will also appear at National Park Service and U.S. Fish and Wildlife properties. A new brochure about the corridor is being released as well.

The culture, known as Gullah in the Carolinas and Geechee in Georgia and Florida, survived for decades because of the isolation of the area's sea islands. Now it's threatened by coastal development.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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