Five brothers continue family tradition of Eagle Scout rank
by Sally Litchfield
sallylit@bellsouth.net
October 21, 2012 02:27 AM | 2753 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Becoming an Eagle Scout is a tradition in the Robertson family. Starting with their father Morgan Robertson, brothers from left, Kemp, Philip, Crawford, Peter and Cole attained the Eagle Scout rank. <br> Photo by Emily Barnes
Becoming an Eagle Scout is a tradition in the Robertson family. Starting with their father Morgan Robertson, brothers from left, Kemp, Philip, Crawford, Peter and Cole attained the Eagle Scout rank.
Photo by Emily Barnes
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Scouting is a family tradition for Morgan Robertson’s five sons. Following in the footsteps of their father and great-uncle Hap McNeel, Peter (28), Crawford (26), Philip (23), Kemp (21) and Cole (18) earned the rank of Eagle Scout.

“I’m very pleased that (all my sons) became Eagles Scouts,” the proud father said.

Scouting dates back in the family to the boys’ great-grandfather, Morgan McNeel, who was a member of the first Scout troop in Cobb County. McNeel joined the troop in 1912 a few years after Scouting came to the U.S. He was awarded the Silver Beaver Award for his work in supporting scouting.

“Scouting was very important to me and has remained important. It is probably the premier organization for young men. It focuses not only on outdoor skills and first aid skills but emphasizes citizenship and community service,” Morgan said. “Being an Eagle Scout was one of (the things I wanted my sons to accomplish).”

The five Robertson boys participated as members of Troop 287 sponsored by St. Joseph Catholic Church. Each received their Eagle Scout rank close to their 18th birthday. Peter and Crawford took part in separate Courts of Honor.

On May 28, Phillip, Kemp and Cole participated in one Court of Honor along with two other scouts, Andrew Brinkmann and Ben Phillips.

“(The three younger brothers) wanted to do their Court of Honor together, so they waited for Cole to complete his requirements,” Robertson explained.

The Robertson boys fall within a select group of 4 percent of Scouts that achieve the rank of Eagle Scout.

It is not a simple task. A Scout must earn a minimum of 21 merit badges including 12 mandated Eagle Scout badges and nine elective badges.

Once the Scout earns his required merit badges, he must plan and execute an Eagle Scout project. Philip built a brick walkway for the Knights of Columbus, the Catholic Men’s Organization, in Marietta. Kemp built a planting bed and restored a sign at the family church, Church of Our Redeemer, and Cole built a 20x10-foot pavilion there.

Robertson credits the dedicated adults that work with the troop as Life to Eagle Coordinators giving encouragement and advice to boys working toward their Eagle Scout rank.

Lyle Staub held the position when Philip and Kemp worked on their projects. Jeff Hicks held the position when Cole worked on his project.

“I am very proud of all my sons,” Robertson said.

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