Decongestant: New turn lane to be added to South Marietta Parkway
by Hilary Butschek
June 13, 2014 04:00 AM | 3701 views | 2 2 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Marietta City Councilman Johnny Walker observes congested traffic at the intersection of Powder Springs Road and South Marietta Parkway on Wednesday morning. Plans have been approved and funded to add a second right turn lane onto northbound Powder Springs Road as drivers head west to turn toward Marietta, said Charlie Lanz, the city’s acting engineer.<br>Staff/Kelly J. Huff
Marietta City Councilman Johnny Walker observes congested traffic at the intersection of Powder Springs Road and South Marietta Parkway on Wednesday morning. Plans have been approved and funded to add a second right turn lane onto northbound Powder Springs Road as drivers head west to turn toward Marietta, said Charlie Lanz, the city’s acting engineer.
Staff/Kelly J. Huff
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MARIETTA — Drivers sitting in traffic backed up on South Marietta Parkway at the intersection of Powder Springs Road will soon be able to move through more quickly.

The City Council voted 7-0 at its Wednesday meeting to add a second right turn lane on South Marietta Parkway.

The turn lane will be constructed on South Marietta Parkway — also known as State Route 120 — as drivers head west to turn toward Marietta, said Charlie Lanz, the city’s acting engineer.

The project, which will cost $381,000, will be paid for by the Georgia Department of Transportation.

“We’re managing the project, but it’s 100 percent funded by GDOT,” Lanz said.

The frequent traffic backups happening at the intersection spurred the city to make changes to it.

“It’s just to help improve traffic operations at that inter-section,” Lanz said. “It gets really backed up.”

He said the city keeps track of how its intersections are operating, and this one operates “poorly” because it is frequently congested.

“That’s one of our busiest intersections, and also one with a level of wrecks and a level of traffic that has to be addressed,” Marietta Mayor Steve Tumlin said.

Councilman Johnny Walker, who represents the area around the intersection, said he thinks the construction is needed because he often sees traffic backed up as drivers try to turn right, but said he hasn’t seen many wrecks in the area.

The mayor said all the traffic comes from those who live west of Whitlock Street, near the Powder Springs area, traveling east toward downtown Marietta.

“That’s where everyone is headed, out to I-75. So it gets really busy,” Tumlin said.

Traffic signals will also be installed as part of the approved project for the turn lanes to make the turn safer — a change from the yield signs in the right turn lane of the intersection, which has a red light camera.

Construction is expected to start in July, Lanz said. Once it begins, the new lane will be complete in 180 days or less.

During construction, Lanz said drivers will continue to be able to turn right.

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go west young man?
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June 26, 2014
You know that big weird five lane thing that is less that one block long, on the South side of the South Marietta Pkwy a little bit west of the Huddle House, that you can use to short cut through on old Clay St to Atlanta Rd southbound?

That thing was the original path of the Marietta Parkway Loop 120 before it got too expensive to dig an underpass under the CSX tracks at East Dixie and they decided to dig under and abandon the west side of loop 120 entirely, just adding a bisection and calling it "done."

The Marietta Parkway Loop 120 needs to follow that original path of Old Clay St, over through the blighted Dixie/Gramling area, out blighted Powder Springs Rd where all the dilapidated apartments and crumbling shopping centers need to go away despite the pretty new street lights and sidewalks that did not help anything.

Our missing, but critical, part of the S Marietta Pkwy should be built as originally intended, following the path of Chestnut Hill Rd and connecting through to Dallas Hwy at Cheatham Hill.

Those Chestnut Hill houses are just 1980s development tract homes of no redeeming value to anybody other than being shelter for their current occupants.

Why do talk about expanding the ability for automobiles to continually trash the historic part of town just so some people in 1980s tract homes of low quality can "enjoy suburbia" in the wrong part of town for that?

Chestnut Hill Rd would not even be there had the original Marietta Pkwy been built as planned, so it is time for Marietta to right this enormous wrong, correct our city's course, and right the container ship that's being sunk by having too many cars on it!

Finish the South Marietta Parkway based on its original plan!!!!!! Tear out Dixie, Gramling, and Chestnut Hill (despite the busybody Chestnut HOA whiners who don't want to move to some other 1980s housing development, but wouldn't it be nice not to have to listen to them anymore) and finish the South Marietta Pkwy!

Just give Hyacinth Bucket and all her Chestnut Hill neighbors enough money to buy another house with an extra 2000 sq ft in some other 1980s development. They will all take the money and run, because bigger is always better!

If they just don't want to take the money and move, we can make their elementary school really bad, the worst in the city, watch their home values plummet, and then make another offer!!
West Cobb Frustrated
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June 13, 2014
This will move the problem two/three blocks to the north, or I should say it will make those situations worse. That is, the real problem for the city of Marietta is the traffic moving back and forth from I-75 to West Cobb and Paulding. What really needs to happen is to make Polk St. one way going west, Whitlock St. one way coming east (from just west of the Kroeger) and Dallas Hwy a four lane road going thru Kennesaw Mtn Park. Until that all happens (the roads are already designed for this, and all but the park four lane is done), the city will continue to experience congestion west of the square. The politically connected residents of the city, and the national park service, keep this all from happening. As has existed for at least 10 years, the congestion will continue until this all gets in place.
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