Debby drenches Florida’s Gulf Coast
by Tamara Lush, Associated Press and Brendan Farrington, Associated Press
June 25, 2012 09:05 AM | 1032 views | 0 0 comments | 4 4 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Canoe-goers navigate flooded streets as flooding continues to worsen and Tropical Storm Debby pounds the Tampa Bay, Fla., area Sunday, June 24, 2012. Tropical Storm Debby continued to churn in the Gulf of Mexico. (AP Photo/Tampa Bay Tribune, Chris Zuppa)
Canoe-goers navigate flooded streets as flooding continues to worsen and Tropical Storm Debby pounds the Tampa Bay, Fla., area Sunday, June 24, 2012. Tropical Storm Debby continued to churn in the Gulf of Mexico. (AP Photo/Tampa Bay Tribune, Chris Zuppa)
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Tropical Storm Debby
A surfer rides a wave off Okaloosa Island in Fort Walton Beach, Fla., on Saturday, June 23, 2012. A storm system will bring more heavy showers and thunderstorms to southern Florida and the Gulf Coast. This system has a high chance of tropical cyclone development over the weekend. (AP Photo/Northwest Florida Daily News, Nick Tomecek)
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TAMPA, Fla. — Practically parked off Florida’s Gulf Coast since the weekend, Tropical Storm Debby struck the Tampa Bay area with high wind and heavy rain Monday in a drenching that could top 2 feet over the next few days and trigger widespread flooding.

At least one person was killed Sunday by a tornado spun off by the large storm system in Florida, and Alabama authorities searched for a man who disappeared in the rough surf.

An estimated 35,000 homes and businesses lost electricity. But as of midafternoon, the slow-moving storm had caused only scattered damage, including flooding in some low-lying areas.

The bridge leading to St. George Island, a vacation spot along the Florida Panhandle, was closed to everyone except residents, renters and business owners to keep looters out. The island had no power, and palm trees had been blown down, but roads were passable.

“Most true islanders are hanging in there because they know that you may or may not be able to get back to your home when you need to,” said David Walker, an island resident having a beer at Eddy Teach’s bar. He said he had been through many storms on the island and Debby was on the weaker end of the scale.

Gov. Rick Scott declared a statewide emergency, allowing authorities to put laws against price-gouging into effect and override bureaucratic hurdles to deal with the storm.

By 8 p.m. Monday, Debby was stationary in the Gulf of Mexico, 30 miles southwest of Apalachicola, with sustained winds around 45 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

A tropical storm warning remained in effect Monday evening for more than 500 miles of coastline, from Destin in the upper Panhandle to Englewood, south of Sarasota.

Forecasters cautioned that Debby is a large tropical cyclone spreading strong winds and heavy rains at great distances from its center.

They said it would crawl to the northeast, come ashore along Florida’s northwestern coast on Wednesday and track slowly across the state, exiting along the Atlantic Coast by Saturday morning and losing steam along the way.

Parts of northern Florida could get 10 to 15 inches of rain, and some spots as much as 25 inches, as the storm wrings itself out, forecasters said.

“The widespread flooding is the biggest concern,” said Florida Emergency Operations Center spokeswoman Julie Roberts. “It’s a concern that Debby is going to be around for the next couple of days, and while it sits there, it’s going to continue to drop rain. The longer it sits, the more rain we get.”

High winds and the threat of flooding forced the closing of an interstate highway bridge that spans Tampa Bay and links St. Petersburg with areas to the southwest.

Monday evening, the state announced the closing of the Howard Frankland bridge that connects Tampa, including the region’s major airport, and St. Petersburg. The eight-lane bridge carries Interstate 275 over Tampa Bay. Traffic was being diverted to an alternative span.
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