Daughters of Confederacy rededicate marker
by Hannah Morgan
October 05, 2013 01:25 AM | 3379 views | 12 12 comments | 25 25 recommendations | email to a friend | print

Mary Anne McCurdy, president of Kennesaw Chapter 241 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, places a basket full of long-stemmed white carnations at the foot of a bronze statue of Mattie Harris Lyon, who was UDC honorary president whose efforts were recognized Friday during a rededication ceremony of her grave site and her husband’s, Merritt R. Lyon, of Company A, 11th Regiment of the Georgia Militia.
<br>Staff/Jeff Stanton
Mary Anne McCurdy, president of Kennesaw Chapter 241 of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, places a basket full of long-stemmed white carnations at the foot of a bronze statue of Mattie Harris Lyon, who was UDC honorary president whose efforts were recognized Friday during a rededication ceremony of her grave site and her husband’s, Merritt R. Lyon, of Company A, 11th Regiment of the Georgia Militia.
Staff/Jeff Stanton
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Dozens of ladies dressed in white gathered around the grave of Mattie Harris Lyon in the Marietta City Confederate Cemetery on Friday afternoon to memorialize one of the many women who devoted their energies to preserving the Confederate cause.

The Georgia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy played host to its 118th annual convention in Marietta this year. Daughters from all over the state flocked to the city to plan for the coming year, and to honor many of the historic sites across Marietta.

To be admitted as a daughter, one needs to prove direct lineage to a Confederate soldier, said Carole Jordan, a 25-year member of the Kennesaw Chapter UDC 241.

Daughters strive to uphold five pillars of the UDC: historical, educational, benevolent, memorial and patriotic objectives, said Jane Durdon, a past president of the state division and a former president of the national organization.

Friday’s memorial service paid homage to Mattie Harris Lyon, who was born in 1850 on the Noonday Plantation, about 10 miles north of Marietta, off of Canton Highway.

Lyon, one of the charter members of the Kennesaw chapter of the UDC, led a march of schoolchildren through the Confederate Cemetery to clean up the graves and was named an honorary president of the UDC, said Durdon.

Lyon is buried next to her husband, Merritt R. Lyon, who was a Confederate soldier.

The daughters placed a Confederate flag on her grave to rededicate the marker since it had been a long time since it was first dedicated, said Janice Thurmond, a Marietta resident and member of the Phillips Legion 2300 chapter, which meets in Smyrna.

An Iron Cross was also dedicated on the grave of her husband, and a basket of white carnations was placed in front of the statue of Mattie Lyon, which sits beside her grave.

“She was such an important part of the UDC and the cemetery,” Durdon said.

The state members of the UDC donated $5,000 to the Marietta City Confederate Cemetery Foundation this year. The donation will be put toward buying a new statue of a Confederate soldier for the cemetery, said Betty Hunter, the foundation’s president.

The members traditionally wear all white, with white gloves and hats, because white is the state’s traditional color, said Sandi Driskill, the Georgia state historian. Each state has its own color, but members of the Georgia division can wear other colors if they choose, she said.

A red ribbon was draped across Driskill’s chest, where more than 20 thin, gold bands were pinned. Each band read the name of one of Driskill’s ancestors who had fought for the Confederacy, said the Albany resident.

Many of the women wore similar pins, proudly bearing the names of their ancestors.

There are currently more than 2,100 members of the Georgia division, and about 20,000 in the national organization, said Durdon.

The annual convention began Thursday at the Hilton Marietta Hotel and Conference Center and will run through today.

Comments
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Lib in Cobb
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October 10, 2013
@Mustard: No, I am not uneducated. I was not born and raised in a "red state". I was born in a state where the public education is quite good, in fact my home state ranks nearly at the top of the list for graduation rates. I was also educated in two public universities.

What you have misunderstood for anger is passion. My passion is the result of the many conversations I have had with Republicans right here in GA, who have totally misunderstood most of everything.

Have a nice day.
Lib in Cobb
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October 07, 2013
Are there any women who are members of the DOC who are not collecting Social Security. In looking at the pictures published by MDJ, it seems once the current membership dies off there will be no membership.
Col. Mustard (Ret.)
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October 08, 2013
You are published proof that anyone linked to the liberal 'cause" is uneducated and has opinions that are strictly based on emotion and not facts. Everything you say here is nothing short of angry and hateful - true proof that you are a liberal. This is a nice article about women who take the time to honor, remember and memorialize their ancestors. One can only respect that. But true liberals must react with anger and resentment anywhere there is a chance to disagree with someone. If nothing else, thank you for yet again proving what we all know about your ilk.
Janet M
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October 06, 2013
The UDC works for all people, especially all Veterans. They support financially the Wounded Warrior Project, provide support for homeless veterans along with many other worthy causes. As a history teacher we must remember history is a part of who our nation is......good or bad. We learn from our past. To forget or try to change it is a mistake. Organizations like DAR and UDC honor our forefathers who fought for their country. The Civil War and Slavery sadly are a part of our history and we should never forget how evil slavery was. However, we can still honor those who fought for their beliefs in States Rights and Independence. We learn from our past.
Lib in Cobb
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October 06, 2013
@just sayin: You're right I should lighten up. When I read or hear about the Confederate "cause" I don't automatically think of those who may be honoring the soldiers who fought in defense of their nation. I have lived in GA for a long time, I am originally from the northeast. Too many times I have heard from unexpected sources a conversation about the Confederate "cause" and how that history, all of that history, including the ugly parts of that history needs to be preserved and honored. When I see anyone flying the Confederate flag it turns my stomach, because to me and many others it represents oppression, hatred, all part of southern history.
Lib in Cobb
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October 05, 2013
@Taxpayer: Since you have objected to my initial post. You must also be objecting to the documented history of the Confederate "cause", that would be everything I wrote earlier. The seceding of the 11 southern states, slavery and all the ugliness which came with it. Are you objecting to that history or just me? If you are objecting to me only, then it is you who is conveniently ignoring the truth.
Lib in Cobb
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October 05, 2013
@Just Sayin: So what you are suggesting is that my argument should be with the MDJ editors?
A Taxpayer
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October 05, 2013
Lib in Cobb, you embarrass yourself with your comments. Number one, it's secession, not "cessation." You obviously don't know "it's" history, except for what you have been spoon-fed during your limited public education. Save your brilliant remarks for something you have actually researched in-depth.
Lib in Cobb
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October 05, 2013
@A Taxpayer: My spelling does indeed help, my thoughts and core values do not. My public education was not in GA, making it far from limited. If GA public education was not so insufficient there would be no need for so many private schools.

Are you one of those Repubs who believe that only you and the conservative tribe are the only tax payers?
Lib in Cobb
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October 06, 2013
Before I get punished. Correction is needed.

Should read: "does indeed need.....".
Lib in Cobb
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October 05, 2013
"to memorialize one of the many women who devoted their energies to the Confederate cause". The Confederate cause? Does that mean, the cessation

of 11 states from our Union which brought on a bloody civil war and a very dark and offensive part of our history. The Confederate cause, such as stripping thousands of people of their dignity, women being rape, children being separated from their parents. The Confederate cause, as in, the enslavement of people because of skin color, then being worked to death or flogged due to issues of some ill founded idea of respect. That Confederate cause? Yeah, I know it's history.
just sayin
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October 05, 2013
Lighten up Lib in Cobb. As someone as liberal as you don't be confused by the writers ignorant characterization of the Confederate "CAUSE". This is strictly her uneducated opinion. The UDC unlike the Sons of the Confederacy have never been about the "cause". The emphasis of the UDC from the beginning has been about honoring the graves and lives of thousands of young men who gave their lives in that war. As a lib I have always had the highest respect for the UDC's ability to remain apolitical and solely about the dead rather the cause for which they died.
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