Common Core will bring national assessment, federal curriculum
by Don McKee
May 06, 2013 12:03 AM | 2851 views | 7 7 comments | 14 14 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Don McKee
Don McKee
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State education Superintendent John Barge told Cobb Republicans at their Saturday breakfast he’s concerned about the looming Common Core Standards-related national assessment of students “because in my mind, that gets to a federal curriculum, because what gets tested gets taught, and at that point somebody else is controlling what’s going on in my classrooms.” That’s the core problem with Core. Barge said he had requested that Georgia be given flexibility on the national tests now being developed by a group of collaborating states taking part in the Partnership for Assessment College and Careers. “They’re not interested in allowing us the flexibility to do that,” he said, pointing out that the time is quickly approaching for Georgia to make a decision on whether to stay in the Common Core program. The message he heard from the Republicans was that Georgia should get out of Common Core, following the lead of other states and a growing number of local school boards and heeding the opposition of citizens. The Cobb school board voted 4-3 last month against buying $7.5 million in math textbooks featuring Common Core Standards. It’s ironic that in drafting Common Core, Georgia’s performance standards were used because they were among the best in the country. If the Legislature decides to opt out of Common Core, it would be no problem, Barge said, because there is “90 percent alignment” with the state standards. So why should Georgia be tied up with federal mandates that come with this program, just like they do with every other federal program? Of course, this began with money, so-called federal money, from the Race to the Top initiative of President Obama — who, like his predecessor, thinks it is the job of the federal government to fix whatever’s wrong with education in Cobb County, Marietta and every other local school district. Regardless of good intentions, the experiments in federal remedies for problems in education do not produce the desired results. And of course, once the so-called federal money is handed out and the mandates imposed, then come the costs to the states. In the case of the Core assessments now in development, Barge said they are “astronomically expensive.” Georgia’s annual budget for testing will more than double from $25 million to $53 million. And judging by other federal money-mandate programs, that’s just the tip of the iceberg. Barge made the point that he and Gov. Nathan Deal “walked into and inherited the Race to the Top grant and Common Core standards,” the work of their predecessors. But now it’s up to him and Deal — with help from state legislators, informed by their constituents — to set things right. It’s time to give our teachers a break from ever-changing standards and tests. Barge knows how frustrated our teachers are. As he put it, “Teachers at this point are kind of frazzled when it comes to, ‘Stop changing the curriculum, stop monkeying with the curriculum. Let us teach.’” Enough said. Out with this Core.

dmckee9613@aol.com
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off balance
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May 06, 2013
From an American Thinker article by Larissa Atbashian

"Once Common Core is nationally implemented and federally enforced, public education will become just another word for a forcible indoctrination of our children to induce them to give up their parents' political, social, or religious beliefs and attitudes and to accept contrasting regimented ideas. This is the dictionary definition of brainwashing."
frogbreath
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May 06, 2013
School Work

What do you know about Howard Zinjn? What do you know about brainwashing through the school system. Re: Education of children from Communist Party quotes:

"We must create out of the younger generation a generation of Communists. We must turn children, who can be shaped like wax, into real, good Communists.... We must remove the children from the crude influence of their families. We must take them over and, to speak frankly, nationalize them. From the first days of their lives they will be under the healthy influence of Communist children's nurseries and schools. There they will grow up to be real Communists."

So you want to compromise???
School Work
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May 06, 2013
I was educated in Cobb County & my grown child is now a resident of Cherokee County. I have a grandchild who will enter 6th grade this fall, so I attended the middle school open house with my child & grandchild. If I had not read the MDJ, I would not have known the words "Common Core" nor would I have known there was any controversy about the program.

Common Core was mentioned by the principal in the introduction to parents by his simply saying they follow it. When I went to meet with the math teachers, they said they were very excited about Common Core. The teacher said for the school year 2011-2012, they had 11 units to teach the 6th graders and that was too much content for the school year. Now in the school year 2012-2013 under Common Core, they had 7 units to teach and that was more manageable. They also liked the way concepts were explained.

What is wrong with all the U.S. having the same learning requirements in math for every grade level? I have heard since the 1960s that when a child transfers from the west coast or the east coast to GA, including to our wonderfully acclaimed Cobb County schools, that they have already been taught that math concept & are ahead of us. It is a fact, that GA lags behind most other states. What are we going to do about it? Continue arguing and objecting to every program from outside the state of GA because some GA bureaucrat didn't come up with it?

Are we to believe, according to mostly Republicans, that every thing done at the federal level now is Socialist & Marxist, directed by Ayers & part of some huge world wide conspiracy? Thirty years ago with less federal money, education in GA was almost at the bottom? Have we steadily improved? I don't think the stats indicate we have. Have the GA educrats come up with wonderful programs that lift us from the bottom? Not that I have seen.

Cobb County has had an excellent reputation for their school system, but ever since Cobb became a "red" county, there has been more controversy, more scandal (laptops, evolution stickers on books, artificial turf, firing teachers that don't report alledged abuses soon enough), area superintendents, more principals moved to Glover St positions, more "retired" principals hired as consultants, higher salaries for the highups at Glover St, more money spent on new schools, more money wasted, fewer school days, & class size increases to name just a few. Instead of our system just standing still in advancement, as it has done for the past several years, let us move forward with improvement.

Please, those in control, work together, come to compromises & solutions instead of griping about everything. After all, isn't this what is preached AND enforced upon our students?
Old timer
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May 09, 2013
Qmath is not the real problem.....social sciences, literature,and similar open ended subjects is the problem. Lack of depth in history and reading material is the problem. Your grandchild will get a good education because there are adults involved. Georgia's problem is rural areas and poverty were no one places importance on school work.
off balance
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May 06, 2013
Dear anonymous Oh, shut6 up1

Shut up and let the truth be read.

Dear anonymous "wants to fix" education. Spot on!
anonymous
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May 06, 2013
Mr. McKee, when you say Obama "wants to fix" education, you do a slight disservice to low information voters. In reality, he does NOT want to fix it, he wants to hand it over to his buddy William Ayers and the group of Marxist former hippy revolutionary domestic bombers turned "teacher's teachers" that they have inexplicably become.

Common Core is the fruition of Ayers vision for remaking our children into little Marxists, and Georgia's republican politicians had better realized this soon and take a stand against it, or they WILL answer to the people.
anonymous
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May 06, 2013
Oh, shut up. Georgia has lagged at almost the bottom in education for many years and that has absolutely nothing to do with Common Core. What you need to pay attention to is testing teachers for substance abuse, which I go on record to say is rampant. How in the world a state superintendent of schools that lags behind the nation can use Common Core as a scapegoat is to support the "educators" that, when hours worked compared to comparable education salary, works out to 52%, well, That speaks for itself. If Georgia were ranked not in the bottom, well. This man needs to be thrown out.
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