Celebrating 225 years of America’s Constitution
by Geoff Folsom
gfolsom@mdjonline.com
September 17, 2012 01:08 AM | 2614 views | 5 5 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Jon Goss, left, 12, and his 10-year-old sister, Anna, learn about Amendments 25, 26 and 27 with their grandmother, Carolyn Albright, of Marietta, during the Constitution Challenge at the 3rd annual Constitution Day Festival, which celebrated the 225th anniversary of the Constitution, on the Marietta Square on Sunday. <br>Staff photo by Jon-Michael Sullivan
Jon Goss, left, 12, and his 10-year-old sister, Anna, learn about Amendments 25, 26 and 27 with their grandmother, Carolyn Albright, of Marietta, during the Constitution Challenge at the 3rd annual Constitution Day Festival, which celebrated the 225th anniversary of the Constitution, on the Marietta Square on Sunday.
Staff photo by Jon-Michael Sullivan
slideshow
The 3rd annual Constitution Day Festival took place on the Marietta Square on Sunday and celebrated the 225th anniversary of the Constitution. <br> Photo by Jon-Michael Sullivan
The 3rd annual Constitution Day Festival took place on the Marietta Square on Sunday and celebrated the 225th anniversary of the Constitution.
Photo by Jon-Michael Sullivan
slideshow
Conrad Quagliaroli, representing the Cherokee Tea Party Patriots, hands out an informational sheet with facts about the men who signed the Declaration of Independence and how get involved with the Tea Party. <br> Photo by Jon-Michael Sullivan
Conrad Quagliaroli, representing the Cherokee Tea Party Patriots, hands out an informational sheet with facts about the men who signed the Declaration of Independence and how get involved with the Tea Party.
Photo by Jon-Michael Sullivan
slideshow
The Marietta-based band Lauren St. Jane and The Dead Westerns were one of the musical performers during the 3rd annual Constitution Day Festival. <br> Photo by Jon-Michael Sullivan
The Marietta-based band Lauren St. Jane and The Dead Westerns were one of the musical performers during the 3rd annual Constitution Day Festival.
Photo by Jon-Michael Sullivan
slideshow
MARIETTA – Within an hour after the Constitution Day Festival of Georgia’s opening on Sunday, Jon Goss and his sister, Anna, had visited four parts of the “Constitution Challenge,” where they learn about a different amendment.

So far, Jon said his favorite amendment was the sixth, which guarantees a right to a speedy trial.

“It’s just good to know that I can have more freedom,” said Jon, 12.

The Sunday afternoon event at Glover Park on the Marietta Square featured live music, food and games, but also lessons that attendees can take home on the 225th anniversary of the signing of the U.S. Constitution, which actually took place on Sept. 17, 1787. Many participants dressed in costumes from the late 1700s.

Those who show that they’ve visited every amendment station were entered in a drawing for Atlanta Braves tickets, and other prizes including books written by former Ronald Reagan Attorney General Edwin Meese.

Goss’ grandmother, 72-year-old Carolyn Albright of Marietta, said she took them to the festival to help the kids learn more about the Constitution.

“I wanted them to be able to relate to it, so they will be able to talk about it and know when our rights might be in question,” Albright said.

The event was the third to be held in the Square. It was hosted by the Georgia Chapter of the Americans for Prosperity Foundation, a group that advocates for limited government. It is associated with Arlington, Va.-based Americans for Prosperity, which was founded by oil billionaires Charles and David Koch, and has been instrumental in the Tea Party movement.

“We just want to educate people about the Constitution and the amendments,” said Virginia Galloway, AFPF’s Georgia state director.

With rain in the forecast, Galloway still expected a crowd of a “couple thousand” at the event, which closed traffic to East Park Square and North Park Square on Sunday afternoon.

“It’s just such a beautiful location that’s easily found,” she said.

Mark Stephens of Aldie, Va., brought his mother to the event to see Banks and Shane, a high-energy music group. But they also enjoyed seeing the opening presentation about “Star Spangled Banner” scribe Francis Scott Key.

“We love to come out here,” Stephens said.

While she has seen numerous historic re-enactments in Virginia and Massachusetts, Stephens’s 81-year-old mother, Jean, said the ones in this area are always top notch.

“I don’t know of any place that has festivals like Cobb County,” she said. “This county has so many things going on — it’s a wonderful place to live.”
Comments
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Mr. NineMM
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September 17, 2012
Yeah let's not teach our kids anything useful about their rights, the limitations of the Federal government, and how the three branches of government work between themselves and the States.

Mr. 99% needs to remove the tinfoil wrap from his head, it appears to be restricting blood flow.
Joseph Pond
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September 17, 2012
I saw Commissioner Birrell at the Festival. I hope she was able to brush up on the Constitution, and will reconsider her support of the county's chicken ban~
One of the 99%
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September 17, 2012
This was sponsored by Americans for Prosperity which is funded by the Koch Brothers. There's a hidden agenda here and it's not in your best interest. A big ruckus was raised about Chick fil A but nobody says or does anything about these brothers and their 501(c)3 and 501(c)4 organizations.
The Silent Majority
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September 17, 2012
So what do you suggest that anyone "do" about them? That sounds rather sinister. Apparently you are not happy with limiting government. Limiting speech of someone you disagree with is more up your alley. So Herr Goebbels, what hidden agenda do YOU have?
Ura Commie
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September 17, 2012
Since when is learning about the Constitution not in any US citizen's best interest?

Stop being so paranoid!
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