MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at Leo Frank, a pool, Lockheed, the ACLU and the anti-gay resolution.
August 28, 2015 03:30 PM | 197667 views | 0 0 comments | 4170 4170 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

view as list
The Week of Jan. 8
by Damon_Poirier
January 10, 2015 04:00 AM | 2894 views | 0 0 comments | 272 272 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Lockheed, a bull, a mayor’s car and Newt Gingrich.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Jan. 8, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story about a missing 18-year-old man who was last seen on Dec. 28. The young man was said to have come to Marietta to hear the police court trials of a group of people arrested on Christmas and then disappeared after leaving the courtroom.

On the front page of that edition, the First National Bank of Marietta ran a half-page ad with their semi-annual financial statement. The bank reported that deposits on Dec. 31, 1914 were $495,167.14 which was $31,347.37 more than the year before.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Jan. 3, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that Lockheed-Georgia Company at Marietta was expected to fill a $6 million project definition contract for the Air Force’s C-5 A long-range, heavy logistic aircraft. The company was one of three in the nation chosen to do the development work on the plane.

Lockheed-Georgia was also reported that day as dickering with the Air Force for delivery of 18 more C-141 StarLifter cargo fan jets. The deal pushed total Air Force purchases to 150, and total cost to over $500 million.



New Cobb County Commissioner Chairman Ernest Barrett was reported in the Monday, Jan. 4, 1965 paper said that the county was hiring an efficiency expert to help unsnarl the county’s financial affairs. Barrett made the announcement as he and the four members of the new multiple commission officially went to work after a historic change over from the old single commissioner form of government. Barrett also said the county would employ the efficiency expert from the nationwide accounting firm of Ernst & Ernst.

The new Cobb County commission was reported on Tuesday, Jan. 5, 1965 that it took swift action over the embattled county courthouse by ordering a halt in construction and calling for an investigation of the financing. Commission Chairman Ernest Barrett said the work stopped as accountants began delving into the financial status of the new three building courthouse complex. Barrett declared that construction of the first of the three buildings, the judicial building, would not begin again until the final cost of the four-story structure was known.

A second story in that paper announced that a machinist from Powder Springs lassoed a charging bull in his back yard. The man tied the bull to a pecan tree and scoured the neighborhood of his Mayes Road home in an attempt to find the animal’s owner. During the bull’s rampage, a pine tree had been shredded to pieces, a bush had been uprooted and a backyard swing had been broken. The man also stated that he saw the bull sharpening its horns on the door of his cream-colored convertible.

Cobb County Superior Court Judge Albert Henderson dismissed a complaint charging the Cobb-Marietta Water Authority with “fraudulently” bypassing an apparent low bid for a new Lake Allatoona water treatment plant pipeline. The plaintiff in the suit, L.B. Foster Company of Pennsylvania, said it planned to appeal the ruling.

Another story in that edition reported that Marietta Mayor Howard Atherton’s Thunderbird, which had been stolen from behind City Hall, was recovered by the Atlanta Police Department. Ten people, including three juveniles, were held in connection to the theft of at least a dozen automobiles – including the mayor’s – across the Atlanta area. Each of the cars had been stolen because they left with their ignition keys in the vehicle.

Four members of the five-man Cobb County planning and zoning board were reported in the Friday, Jan. 8, 1965 paper as having been replaced by the new multiple county commission. The commissioners named four replacements, including Mableton realtor George Wilson who quit the planning-zoning board in June 1964 in a bitter dispute with then-Commissioner Herbert McCollum. David Kelly, the only member of the McCollum-appointed board who was retained, was selected as chairman.

Also that day it was reported that an announced cutback in the Air Force Reserve recovery squadrons throughout the nation would affect only 20 men at Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Marietta.

20 years ago …

In the Thursday, 5, 1994 paper it was reported that anticipation turned to excitement as Newt Gingrich took control of the House. More than 300 friends and supporters of the Republican congressman from east Cobb crammed into a small room in the basement of the Capitol to watch the historic moment on two large-screen televisions. The crowd, most of whom had traveled about 650 miles from Georgia to show their loyalty to Rep. Gingrich, watched as the man known simply as “Newt” became the most powerful congressman in America.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

comments (0)
view/post comments
no comments yet

The Week of Jan. 1
by Damon_Poirier
January 03, 2015 04:00 AM | 2917 views | 0 0 comments | 265 265 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a negligence lawsuit, a F8B Crusader, a jail break, Fred Tokars and Newt Gingrich.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Jan. 1, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story about William Wilson arriving in Marietta to fill the job left vacant by the death of Maj. John A. Commerford, the custodian of the Marietta National Cemetery whose death was reported November. Wilson came to Marietta from Mobile, Ala., and previously had been at the Brownsville, Texas cemetery. It was also reported that a Col. Donaldson of the U.S. Army came to Marietta from Governor’s Island, N.Y., to inspect the cemetery and found it “in first-class order.”

50 years ago …

In the Monday, Dec. 28, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that Marietta’s postmaster Pierce E. Cody was retiring. Cody served as postmaster for 11 years and was a 35-year veteran of the postal service.

Also that day, the Atlanta Gas Light Co., which was being sued by the Atherton Drug Co. of Marietta following the tragic gas explosion on Halloween night 1963 that took seven lives and injured 22 people, counter charged that the blast was caused by the store’s “own negligence.” The gas company filed legal answers to Atherton’s $168,567 damage suit in Cobb Superior Court claiming that the drug company “could have avoided the occurrence of the explosion by the exercise of ordinary care.” Atherton Drugs contended in its suit filed in November that the gas main installed in front of the store in 1931 was defective. According to the drug store, the gas company knew that the line could corrode within 20-25 years.

A third story in that Monday paper reported that several members of the incoming Cobb County school board had indicated that bus transportation would be one of the biggest problems facing the county’s first elected school board. Eugene Housley said one of the problems that would be encountered was that many children, who lived within a mile and a half of school, would still have to be transported because the school they attend was located on heavily travelled roads with no sidewalks. Housley also pointed out that the state would not subsidize the county for any part of the cost of transporting children who lived within the one and a half mile limit.

Naval Air Station Atlanta in Marietta was reported in the Tuesday, Dec. 29, 1964 paper as having received the first F8B Crusader. It marked the beginning of the station’s third jet aircraft transition in three years. The all-weather fighter was replacing the F1E Fury jet that was at the time being flown by the station’s active duty and selected Naval and Marine Air Reserve pilots. Regarded as the “backbone of the Navy’s fighter arm,” the Crusader was the first plane to boost the national speed record higher than 1,000 miles an hour and the first to fly supersonic from the Pacific to the Atlantic – Los Angeles to New York.

A second story reported two prisoners escaped from a second story cell at the Cobb County jail after tying and gagging the turnkey, Marshall Owenby. Six other prisoners in the same cell made no attempt to leave. Owenby had gone into the cell to get a mop bucket when one of the men grabbed him by both shoulders and forced him further into the cell. The following day, Wednesday, Dec. 30, 1964, it was reported that about six hours after the escape one of the men was apprehended by Marietta Police as he attempted to repair a stolen car. Then, on Thursday, Dec. 31, 1964, it was reported that the second prisoner was captured in a house in Cherokee County by sheriff’s deputies and county policemen.

Also in that Thursday paper, it was reported that a gas truck driver unloading gasoline at the K-Mart service station decided to take 40 winks and when he woke up, discovered that he had lost 2,000-gallons of gas across the parking lot.

20 years ago …

In the Friday, Dec. 30, 1994 paper it was reported that Cobb Superior Court Judge Watson White paved the way for family members of Sara Tokars to testify about how her death has affected them during the sentencing phase of the upcoming death-penalty trial of Fred Tokars, if the slain east Cobb woman’s husband was found guilty of ordering her shotgun killing. Defense lawyers planned to appeal the ruling when the Georgia Supreme Court reviewed pre-trial issues in 1995. Judge White ruled during a brief hearing that “victim-impact” testimony would be allowed if Tokars faces a jury for sentencing.

Saying he didn’t want to detract from the GOP mission, Rep. Newt Gingrich was reported in the Saturday, Dec. 31, 1994 paper as having given up a $4.5 million book advance in favor of royalties generated by book sales. The next Speaker of the House had been catching flak from both sides of the aisle after signing the lucrative two-book deal with HarperCollins publishing house just before assuming the highest post in the House. The east Cobb Republican said he expected the criticism from Democrats but was surprised fellow Republicans, including his counterpart in the Senate, Bob Dole of Kansas, were questioning the deal.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

comments (0)
view/post comments
no comments yet

The Week of Dec. 25
by Damon_Poirier
December 27, 2014 04:00 AM | 3312 views | 0 0 comments | 261 261 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at robberies, wrecks, an assault, McCollum Airport and handbills.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Dec. 25, 1914 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story about the night operator at the Kennesaw Depot and another railroad employee who were held up and robbed at gunpoint around 2 a.m. the Wednesday before. The robber was said to have escaped with a total of $25 from the two men and the railroad along with the operator’s watch.

A second story in that edition reported that two railroad car firemen, one from Kennesaw, were killed when the fast southbound W & A Railroad passenger train went down a 75-foot embankment near Emerson in Bartow County the weekend before. Several train cars crashed down the bank and “it was a miracle that a number of passengers were not killed,” however several passengers were badly injured.

50 years ago …

In the Monday, Dec. 21, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal reported that a Marietta girl narrowly escaped injury when her car became impaled by a steel beam sticking out of the back of a truck. The teenager was driving to work in Atlanta when a truck stopped suddenly in front of her and three feet of a steel beam punched through her windshield.

Also that day, an east Marietta robbery was reported. The homeowner told police that he answered his doorbell at 9:45 p.m. to find a man with a stocking over his face holding a gun. He was told to lie down on the floor and three more men entered the home. After a pillow case was thrown over his head, the victim’s wife was brought down from the upstairs and also tied up. The robbers then carried the man to the basement where he opened a safe for them which contained three sacks of coins full of collector’s items and four to five hundred silver dollars.

Consolidation of municipal and county police departments were reported in the Tuesday, Dec. 22, 1964 paper as being considered for the future in the face of possible loss of vitally-needed drunk driving fines by the county’s municipalities. Under state law, municipalities lose jurisdiction of state traffic offenses such as drunk driving when county misdemeanor courts are established like the new Cobb County Criminal and Civil Court – which was expected to open in January 1965. Some officials also talked about the possibility of passing local drunk driving ordinances in order to bypass the state law.

In the Wednesday, Dec. 23, 1964 paper it was reported that evidence from a Lansing, Ill., crime the week before was found locally by Cobb County policemen. A bloody shirt, a pair of pants, several suitcases and a file box were identified as the belongings of a man whose throat was cut “from ear to ear” in Lansing. Since the assault, two teenagers – one from Cartersville and one from Atlanta – who had been with the victim were picked up in Atlanta. The victim was found lying on the side of a street in Lansing at around 4 a.m., beaten with his throat cut, robbed of $25 and his personal papers. The man, who had been thrown out of his car and was still alive after the incident, was being treated for a severed windpipe at a hospital.

A controversial 30-year lease for a second fixed-base operator at the county’s McCollum Airport in Kennesaw was reported in the Thursday, Dec. 24, 1964 paper as being canceled by mutual agreement. County and airport officials also agreed to the appointment of a committee to operate the public-owned field and decided to “seriously investigate” the establishment of an airport authority. A furor was touched off when the Cobb County advisory board followed the recommendation of outgoing airport manager Joe Sandman and leased a section of the field to Mableton businessman W.E. Richardson.

20 years ago …

In its latest clean-city measure, the Smyrna City Council was reported in the Wednesday, Dec. 21, 1994 paper as having voted to prohibit advertising fliers from being left on windshields, utility poles and the doors of people who did not want them. Handbills hawking pizza delivery, carpet cleaning and other commercial products and services were no longer allowed to be placed under windshield wipers. However, fliers promoting free church events, political candidates, charitable cases or other non-commercial enterprises were still allowed.

Five pistol-wielding bandits were reported in the Friday, Dec. 23, 1994 paper as having held up the Barnes Hardware store – a well-known Mableton landmark where locals gathered for generations to talk politics. The bandits made off with 44 firearms and an undisclosed amount of cash after locking four employees in a small storage room. The youths lured store employees to different parts of the store, before producing handguns and forcing them to the rear of the building. None of the employees, who spent less than 20 minutes lying face down on the floor, were injured.

Also in that paper, it was reported that a longstanding road project designed to turn one of Smyrna’s busiest and most dangerous streets into a “grand boulevard” with smoother traffic flow was moving closer to reality. The widening of Spring-Concord Road called for a fifth, center turning lane to be added to Spring Road from Cobb Parkway west to Campbell Road. Construction work was expected to start in late summer 1995.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

comments (0)
view/post comments
no comments yet

The Week of Dec .18
by Damon_Poirier
December 20, 2014 04:00 AM | 3065 views | 0 0 comments | 249 249 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a land deal, a dog pound, an asphalt explosion, a stolen car, pay phones and a toxic spill.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Dec. 18, 1914 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story about E.G. Gilbert, one of Marietta’s most enterprising merchants and businessmen, purchased the entire building occupied by the Gem Theatre and the Haverty Furniture Co. for $20,000. The building, located opposite the courthouse on Washington Avenue, was built just two years earlier and was the property of J.M. Cogburn – who took as partial payment the vacant lot at the corner of Waddell Street and Washington Avenue and a brick warehouse on Waddell, while the balance was paid in cash.

A second story in that edition reported that a movement was started to relieve the distress among the un-employed and needy families in Marietta “by systematically bestowing groceries and coal during the holidays and extreme weather.” James E. Anderson, John M. Warren and Dr. J.D. Malone were being considered for the distribution committee. Henry A. Ward agreed to start the movement’s fund with $25 and was followed with $1 donations by four others.

Another story reported that Drs. W.H. Perkinson and I.L. Blair were appointed surgeons for the Louisville & Nashville Railroad Co. for Cobb County. The appointment was made by A.B. Bayless, the superintendent of the Railroad Company.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Dec. 13, 1964 paper it was reported that people were “barking” about the condition of the jointly operated city-county dog pound. Complaints had been registered about live animals being put in boxes with dead ones, about no one being on the premises to care for the animals and about the unpleasant odor around the pound.

A second story in that paper reported that only 46-percent of the 1964 City of Marietta taxes had been paid. A total of $367,363.59 had been collected, leaving $432,918.99 that still needed to be collected.

Starting on the front page of the Monday, Dec. 14, 1964 paper was the first of the “Witnesses to the Nativity,” a series of imaginative monologues by forerunners and witnesses to the birth of Jesus Christ. The holiday feature from the Los Angeles Times featured Isaiah the Prophet, Zacharias the Priest, Herod the King, Ezra the Trader, The Bethlehem Innkeeper, Simon the Stableboy, Gaius the Centurian, Simeon the Devout, A Bethlehem Shepherd and Balthasar the Wise Man.

Another story that day reported a 5,000-gallon asphalt storage tank blew up at the Cracker Asphalt Corp. plant in Douglasville injuring two workers. The explosion came when the men were transferring liquid asphalt from one tank to another. The cause of the blast was not immediately known. Fire units from Douglasville, Villa Rica, Austell and equipment from Dobbins Air Force Base in Marietta were rushed to the scene.

Commissioner Herbert McCollum and members of the Cobb-Marietta Water Authority were charged in a lawsuit with “fraudulently” and “unlawfully” bypassing an apparent low bid for a million-dollar pipeline contract. A Pennsylvania construction firm, the L.B. Foster Co., contended in the suit that the water authority unlawfully awarded a contract the week before to two Marietta companies. Foster alleged that the advertisements for bids were part of a “fraudulent scheme” to deceive bidders. Members of the water authority knew “full well the contract would not be awarded to the lowest bidder,” the firm claimed. McCollum, who served as the chairman of the authority, said when served with the suit that there was “no truth whatsoever” to the allegations.

Marietta Mayor Howard Atherton‘s yellow Thunderbird was reported in the Thursday, Dec. 17, 1964 paper as having been stolen from behind City Hall after he had left his keys in his car. Ironically, during the theft, Mayor Atherton was speaking to a gathering of city employees about a new Zero Defects program and told them” what it [the program] amounts to is stop and think.”

Another story that day reported that the Cobb county Advisory Board on the advice of McCollum Airport Manager Joe Sandman had leased a section the county-owned airport for 20 years to a private operator. Sandman, who planned to quit his post at the end of the month to enter the real estate business, said he wanted to bind the incoming multiple-seat commission to a second private operator at McCollum to avoid any possibility of a “monopoly.”

20 years ago …

In the Monday, Dec. 12, 1994 MDJ it was reported that some residents and business owners in north Marietta believed that pay phones had become a public nuisance and magnets for the city’s growing crack cocaine trade. In November 1994, acting for a group of local homeowners, Marietta Mayor Ansley Meaders convinced Southern Bell officials to fix four outdoor phones at a Chevron station and convenience store on the southwest corner of Allgood Road and Fairground Street so they would not accept incoming calls. According to Marietta police, because of its bank of phones, the service station had emerged in the last year as a hot spot for crack sales in the city, joining such long standing trouble zones as Roosevelt Circle and Franklin Road.

The Air Force was reported in the Friday, Dec. 16, 1994 paper as saying an old spill of more than 1,000-gallons of a possibly cancer-causing agent by employees of Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co. might have contaminated groundwater beneath Lockheed and Dobbins Air Reserve Base in Marietta. Officials at Wright Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio said the contamination is believed to have been caused by a spill of tricholoroethylene (TCE). The chemical was used to degrease airplane surfaces and was “a suspected carcinogen.” While the spill was thought to have spread toward South Cobb Drive, there was no threat to the county water system.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

comments (0)
view/post comments
no comments yet

The Week of Dec. 11
by Damon_Poirier
December 13, 2014 04:00 AM | 3021 views | 0 0 comments | 235 235 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at WWI, Lockheed, spankings, Newt Gingrich, the Cobb Galleria Centre and Marietta High School football.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Dec. 11, 1914 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story about Mrs. Preston Rambo, who escaped from the clutches of a German warship during the European War, which we now refer to as World War I. The Marietta woman was sailing to New York from Rio de Janiero, Brazil on a British ship, but was quickly overtaken by a vessel called, Karlarhue.

Boarded by the German ship, its captain stated that it was his duty to sink the British ship but that he regretted doing it. The Germans then transferred all of the passengers, crew and pantry supplies to a small boat that was directed back to shore. Mrs. Rambo said that during the transfer she was forced to leave behind her trunks and a 500-pound bag of coffee that she intended for her sisters in Marietta.

A second story in that edition reported that the Mayor and City Council had ordered that no fire-crackers be sold or fired within Marietta that were larger than three inches long. They also ordered that no fire-crackers or fire-works of any kind were to be fired on the Marietta Square or any public street in the city limits between Dec. 23, 1914 and January 3, 1915.

50 years ago …

In the Tuesday, Dec. 8, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that the Lockheed-Georgia Company test flew a new airplane that could save shipwreck victims from the ocean or rescue men trapped thousands of miles behind enemy lines without ever having to land. The HC-130H Hercules was designed for the Air Force and NASA to recover astronauts and nose cones from test missiles. The recovery system consisted of a harness that would be strapped to a person or payload. The harness then would be attached to a stretchable, nylon cord and an inflatable balloon that would hoist the cord 500 feet into the air. On the front of the Hercules was a V-shaped yoke that could be extended to capture the cord and snatch the rescue subject from the ground or ocean’s surface.

Lockheed employees were reported in the Wednesday, Dec. 9, 1964 paper as having set a national record when a C-141 assembly department worker gave the 10,000th pint of blood that the company donated to the Red Cross for 1964. The Red Cross said that it was the first time in the U.S. that a company had donated that much blood in a 12-month period.

The Marietta Board of Education was reported in the Friday, Dec. 11, 1964 paper as having had high hopes that Marietta city officials would find a way to raise the money for an estimated $1.2 million school building expansion program. The expansion program was expected to include a new gym for the high school, a new elementary school, a new junior high school and either repair an existing wing or building a new wing at the high school.

Also that day it was reported that School Principal William Asbury Geer, who paddled failing students and made little boys carry dolls as a form of punishment, said that angry parents could not “run me off” the job. The fervor over Geer, the uncle of then-Lt. Gov. Peter Zack Geer, developed a week earlier when he paddled more than a dozen fifth grade students in front of their classmates because they made failing grades. Several parents protested the spankings and at least two had consulted attorneys over the matter.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, Dec. 5, 1994 MDJ it was reported that Cobb County’s Newt Gingrich, the mastermind behind a nationwide Republican sweep in the Nov. 8 elections, was nominated to the post of U.S. House Speaker. Although the Speaker election wasn’t until Jan. 4, 1995, Rep. Gingrich’s nomination by the Republican majority in the House virtually assured him of the post and would fulfill an ambition that he had harbored for more than 30 years.

A second story on the front page of that paper reported Rep. Gingrich as saying that the United Nations was a failed institution with “grotesque pretensions” and the United States should rethink its commitment to the world body. The harsh critique of the United Nations by Gingrich on NBC’s “Meet the Press” was seen as an indication of the rough road U.S.-U.N. relations would face under the new Republican leadership in Congress.

A third story in that paper reported a bizarre Marietta traffic accident that killed a Texas man. The man, who was trying to cross one side of Interstate 75 on foot, was struck by a van and flipped into the air over a concrete median wall. He was then hit a second time by a car traveling on that side of the highway.

The Cobb Galleria Centre was reported in the Thursday, Dec. 8, 1994 paper as having taken a monumental step toward replacing the business lost when Olympic organizers moved preliminary volleyball matches to Athens as the result of an anti-gay resolution adopted by the Cobb Commission. The 1996 World Showcase and Festival, an international cultural show that organizers said would compete with the Olympics, would replace the booking originally slated for Olympic volleyball.

In the Saturday, Dec. 10, 1994 paper it was reported that Marietta High School’s dream of its first state football championship in almost 30 years turned into a nightmare in a South Georgia town. After claiming nine consecutive victories on their way to the Class AAAA state semifinals, the Blue Devils ran out of gas against unbeaten Colquitt County. The Packers, which were 14-0, were the same team that knocked Marietta out of the 1991 semifinals. The day before, several hundred MHS students had lined up along Polk Street to give the team a rousing sendoff after students were let out of class at 11 a.m.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

comments (0)
view/post comments
no comments yet

The Week of Dec. 4
by Damon_Poirier
December 06, 2014 04:00 AM | 2795 views | 0 0 comments | 232 232 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a train robber, moonshine, tobacco, a plane crash and an exploding manhole.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Dec. 4, 1914 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a front page story about Sheriff W.E. Swanson having arrested a black man who was suspected of killing and trying to burn the bodies of his wife and 10-month old baby. The bodies were said to have been saturated with kerosene oil, but “for some reason the ‘flames went out, and the house was not damaged, except for a hole burned in the floor.”

Also on the front page was the second guilty verdict against a bandit who boldly held up the Louisville and Nashville train in Marietta in January 1914, which appeared in my Jan. 23 column. The man, who was re-sentenced by Judge Henry L. Patterson to 20 years, had made an appeal for a new trial. The Court of Appeals ordered the case be retried, but Solicitor Clay was able to convince the jury again of the man’s guilt. According to various sources, Sheriff Swanson was also said to have gathered enough information on the man’s past that his record rivaled that of the Wild West outlaw Jesse James.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Nov. 29, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that a master plan had been approved for development of recreational facilities at Lake Acworth. The plan, according to Acworth Mayor and chairman of the Acworth Lake Authority Mary McCall, called for enlarging the beach facilities at the lake, construction of small, weekend-type cabins and possibly a golf course.

Also that day, Cobb County servicemen stationed in 10 different countries and three who were aboard Navy vessels were reported as being expected to receive records with recorded Christmas messages from their families through the Red Cross “Voices From Home” program. Forty-seven Cobb wives, parents, children and other relatives gave local and family news, sang Christmas carols and read holiday greetings on 37 free records that were made and sent by the families.

A petite, 95-pound Marietta woman was reported in the Tuesday, Dec. 1, 1964 paper as having shot a 105-pound deer while hunting with her son over the weekend. Mrs. E.A. Bachman shot and killed a six-point buck by herself in the woods. She told the Journal how she dragged the animal for about half a mile to a dirt road before three male hunters came along and helped her get it back to her car.

A court fight seeking to force a liquor referendum in Cobb County was reported in the Wednesday, Dec. 2, 1964 paper as receiving a final defeat. The Georgia Supreme Court affirmed a lower court’s decision backing Cobb Ordinary Garvis Sams in the cancellation of a county-wide liquor vote. Marietta businessman Duke Fernandez, who brought the court action, was quoted as saying he was not sure if he would attempt to pursue making Cobb a wet county again.

An, speaking of booze, the odor of moonshine was reported as still lingering behind the jail in the Thursday, Dec. 3, 1964 paper after the Cobb County Sheriff’s Department poured out 906 gallons of confiscated, non-tax paid whiskey. Deputy Sheriff Jesse Cooper said a one and a half ton truck, with the name of a local egg company on its side, was seen traveling south on U.S. 41. The truck, which was suspected because of the “way it was riding” was followed to Dobbins Air Force Base and stopped. The sheriff’s department, after taking the spirits and the driver to jail, learned that the truck did not even belong to the company whose name had been printed on the sides.

Marietta detectives were reported in the Friday, Dec. 4, 1964 paper as investigating the third in a string of thefts of trucks loaded with cigarettes and tobacco in less than two weeks. The losses of both the tobacco and vehicles were believed to total about $20,000. Officers reportedly were probing the possibility that “professional Black Market cigarette peddlers operating on a big scale” were responsible for the thefts.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, Nov. 20, 1994 paper it was reported that the pilot of a twin-engine Beechcraft plane, lost in heavy fog and unable to make an emergency landing at a Fulton County airport, died when he ran out of gas and crashed in an extreme south Cobb neighborhood. Fortunately, no one on the ground was injured when the plane came down between two houses and hit some wires just north of Charlie Brown Field, just west of the intersection of Hillcrest Drive and Fulton Lane near the Fulton County line. Capt. Sandy Goss of the Cobb County Fire Department was quoted saying that the pilot had radioed Charlie Brown at 6 p.m. to report being lost in the fog and unable to find the airport. He also reported that he had 10 to 15 minutes worth of fuel left. Airport officials tried to talk him down for about seven minutes before he reported that he had lost use of an engine.

An explosion caused by a volatile mixture of gasoline and methane gas was reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 30, 1994 paper as having blown a 100-pound manhole cover off a Marietta sewer drain, damaging up to 130-feet of asphalt and forcing city workers to shut down a section of Roswell Street for more than an hour.

Also that day, answering machine tapes that recorded several conversations between Fred Tokars and his mother in August 1994 were expected to be allowed as evidence in his death-penalty trial. Cobb Superior Court Judge Watson White ordered the tapes and a transcript of the recordings sealed until he decided whether they would be used as evidence. Tokars was accused of ordering the killing of his wife, Sara, in November 1992.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

comments (0)
view/post comments
no comments yet

The Week of Nov. 27
by Damon_Poirier
November 29, 2014 04:00 AM | 2759 views | 0 0 comments | 232 232 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a train derailment, food poisoning, the Atherton Drug Store explosion and Lockheed.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Nov. 27, 1914 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a front page story that reported the death Maj. John A. Commerford, the custodian of the Marietta National Cemetery. The story stated that the 76-year-old Maj. Commerford had just walked home from church and stopped near his home to speak with one of his servants when he died from apoplexy.

The death of 60-year-old W.J. Phagan was also reported on the front page of that edition. Phagan, the grandfather of 13-year-old murder victim Mary Phagan of Marietta, had been ill for months and was said to have suffered from two recent attacks of diphtheria. The elder Phagan was buried in the same Marietta cemetery lot as his granddaughter.

The second page of that edition was a full page ad from McClure Ten Cent Co. in Marietta announcing toy sales for Christmas shopping. The ad stated that Santa Claus was expected to arrive at the store “direct from Toyland” at 10 a.m. the following day with souvenirs for all children. The store also advertised that a large doll and a go cart were to be given away free to any child 12 years old or under that guessed the number of beans in the store’s window.

50 years ago …

Sixteen loaded rail cars in a long southbound L&N freight train were reported in the Tuesday, Nov. 24, 1964 paper as having careened off the tracks near Smyrna and piled up in a twisted wreck. The cars – located near the middle of a 101-car freight train destined for Atlanta – derailed for unknown reasons as it was passing the Gilmore Road crossing near the Oakdale community, south of Smyrna. No one was injured, but cars were overturned and thrown at violent angles about 300 feet along the mainline. Cargoes of coal were thrown out and burying large sections of the tracks. Some of the cars were ripped open or contorted by the impact and appeared to be too damaged to save.

The following day, in the Wednesday, Nov. 25, 1964 paper, it was reported that a railroad policeman told residents that they could cart away the 800 tons of spilled coal once the wreckage was cleared from the tracks if they moved quickly. Several residents armed with baskets reportedly took advantage of the situation. An L&N spokesman in Atlanta told the paper that the scattered cargo would be picked up and hauled away by the company within the next few days.

Also in the Nov. 25 paper, it was reported that health officials had opened up an investigation into the Lemon Street School in Marietta to determine the cause of a wide-spread outbreak of food poisoning among students and teachers. About 220 students and several teachers had swarmed Kennestone Hospital complaining of stomach cramps and severe nausea. Four children were hospitalized, while the rest were treated and released. Authorities suspected that chicken salad sandwiches served at the school the day before might be the culprit for the illnesses.

Later that week, in the Friday, Nov. 27, 1964 paper, state health officials confirmed that spoiled, leftover chicken was the source of the food poisoning. Evidence showed that the government surplus chicken had gone bad after delivery to the school. How the chicken became tainted with a type of coccus bacteria was not known.

A $168,567 lawsuit was reported in the Thursday, Nov. 26, 1964 paper as having been filed against the Atlanta Gas Light Co. by Atherton Drug Co. of Marietta in connection with the 1963 Halloween night explosion which shattered the store and killed seven people. The drug firm alleged in the suit that the negligence of the gas company was the “direct” cause of the blast. It was stated in the suit that gas had escaped from a corroded line in front of the drug store and seeped into the basement where a spark from an air compressor detonated the fumes. For more on the explosion, check out my column from October of last year here.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, Nov. 22, 1994 paper it was reported that the British government got “political clearance” to order 30 C-130Js from Cobb-based Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co., but officials at the South Cobb Drive plant were awaiting “official word” before celebrating. During a summit meeting late the week before, French officials agreed with British Prime Minister John Major’s plan to buy the C-130Js from Lockheed instead of refurbishing the existing transport planes in the Royal Air Force. Despite reports in London newspapers, no “official word” had arrived at the Marietta plant from the British Ministry of Defense, the body that had the final word. The contract was valued at $1.56 billion.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

comments (0)
view/post comments
no comments yet

The Week of Nov. 20
by Damon_Poirier
November 22, 2014 04:00 AM | 3512 views | 0 0 comments | 222 222 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at beer, the Medal of Heroism, a Senator’s rifle, vandalism and Kennesaw State University.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Nov. 20, 1914 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a front page story about D.A. Summerour, who was in charge of the livestock exhibits at the Macon State Fair, going to Savannah for the fair in that district. Summerour won the first prize in Macon for the best 10 ears of corn for the fourth consecutive time.

Also on the front page of that edition, it was reported that the “Corn Club boys and the Canning Club girls” held their first annual exhibit under the direction of J.E. Creel at the Marietta Courthouse.

A third story announced the cotton ginners report, which stated that 13,758 bales of cotton had been ginned in Cobb County Nov. 1. That was over 1,100 bales more than the 12,629 bales ginned before Nov. 1, 1913.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Nov. 15, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal reported on the “largest ‘planned community’ development scheme ever proposed in the Southeast – a $30 to $40 million project.” The community, revealed by a team of Atlanta and international businessmen, was to be built on 300 acres in the Vinings area. It was expected to contain homes costing between $40,000 and $50,000, deluxe apartments, a shopping center, an office building complex and recreational areas that included a par-three golf course, swimming pools and playgrounds.

Another story in that paper said that the Marietta City Council had enacted an ordinance which established strict new standards for licenses to sell beer within the city. The ordinance, which prohibited issuance of a license within 300-feet of a church, school or residential zoned property, was prompted by a then-pending federal suit that challenged the city’s licensing code.

Engineers were reported in the Monday, Nov. 16, 1964 paper as having recommended that the old, original classroom building at Marietta High School be torn down after an inspection revealed severe structural damage. A leaking roof, sagging floors and crumbling walls were cited as the reasons for the condemnation of the then 41-year-old building.

Air Force Reserve Master Sgt. Vaughn W. Elsea of Marietta was reported in the Tuesday, Nov. 17, 1964 paper as having been awarded the Air Force’s Medal for Heroism. Master Sgt. Elsea received the medal for attempting to save others at personal risk after a Marine jet aircraft crashed into a residence in the Fair Oaks community on July 25, 1964 while attempting to land at Dobbins Air Force Base in Marietta. More about the Fair Oaks 1964 Jet Crash, can be found here in my Aug. 6, 2014 column.

The Cobb County Chamber of Commerce was reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 18, 1964 paper as having given Sen. Richard B. Russell a rifle so he could “properly defend” himself during a deer hunt that he was scheduled to attend on President Lyndon B. Johnson’s ranch in Texas. The veteran Georgia lawmaker also received a bright orange hunting jacket with the explanation that “we don’t want anybody to make a mistake.”

Vandalism of two rooms in Cobb County’s Superior Court was reported in the Thursday, Nov. 19, 1964 paper. The vandal knocking down the American and Georgia flags and wrote “defiant slogans against justice on the walls.” Officers took a 16-year-old girl into custody in connection with the incident. The girl, reportedly angry because her brother had been sentenced to the state training school for boys, was charged with hiding in the courthouse until it was locked for the night and then damaging the courtrooms.

Also that day it was reported that Gov. Carl Sanders, who just passed away on Sunday, Nov. 16, 2014, broke ground on the new $2.3-million junior college, which would later become present day Kennesaw State University. Gov. Sanders said in a speech during the event that the junior college would serve in the future as one of Cobb County’s “highest examples of civic pride.” Construction of the eight-building complex was scheduled to begin in May 1965 and the first 1,200 students would enroll in the fall of 1966.

20 years ago …

In the Saturday, Nov. 19, 1994 MDJ, it was reported that a Marietta woman was strangled during an argument with her boyfriend over her pregnancy and that her body had been found in the back seat of his car after a 100-mph chase through two counties in Alabama. The woman, the mother of three-year-old twins and 6½ months pregnant with her third child, died of strangulation and multiple blunt-force trauma wounds, according to an autopsy performed in Mobile, Ala.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

comments (0)
view/post comments
no comments yet

The Week of Nov. 13
by Damon_Poirier
November 15, 2014 04:00 AM | 3451 views | 0 0 comments | 220 220 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a shooting, Lockheed, an Acworth mayor, KSU, the Braves, Newt Gingrich and Fred Tokars.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Nov. 13, 1914 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story about two men on the Atlanta electric car line having shot and killed each other in the car barn office on Church Street. Eye witnesses to the shooting said that it resulted from an argument over the European war, now known as World War I.

The two men had just finished their last runs and were sitting around the stove in the office. One of the men was writing out his report when the argument began. A minute later, the two men drew “.38-caliber Smith & Wesson special six shooters” that each of them carried and fatally shot one another.

Also on the front page, it was reported that R.H. Northcutt’s registered Jersey cow “Peach-Blossom,” which had won the championship at the Alabama State Fair, had won the same award at the State Fair in Macon. Everything exhibited by the Kennesaw Mountain Farm also won prizes.

Mr. Spicer of Illinois, who judged the cattle and hog competitions in Macon, came home with J.T. Anderson for the weekend and was said to have declared that he had not seen a farm in Georgia that equaled Anderson’s farm. Anderson had won several prizes on his Hereford cattle at the State Fair.

The entire second page of that edition was taken up with a list from Rev. G.W. Duval of all the hosts and delegates to the upcoming Methodist Conference taking place in Marietta.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, Nov. 8, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that the Lockheed-Georgia Co. had launched a company-wide project named Campaign Zero Defect. The special project was held at the Marietta plant and attended by about 12,000 day-shift workers, Defense Department dignitaries and other guests. Portions of the program were beamed live via radio to Lockheed installations at Dawsonville; Atlanta; Charleston, S.C.; and Clarksburg, W.Va.

Also that day, the Lockheed Georgia Co. was reported as contributing $275,000 to the United Appeal, helping boost gifts from the five-county Atlanta Metropolitan Area to $3,804,493 or 85.7-percent of the goal.

It was reported in the Monday, Nov. 9, 1964 paper that Gordon Murray Combs died at Kennestone Hospital at the age of 78. Combs practiced law in Marietta for 30 years, was the assistant U.S. attorney from 1915-1922, the mayor of Acworth in 1926 and the U.S. Commissioner from 1926-1929.

Two other stories in that paper reported events that happened in the city of Smyrna. Burglars pried open a safe and stole over $1,000 from Sandy’s Drive-In restaurant on South Cobb Drive at Concord Road, and a fire destroyed an appliance repair shop near the Dickson Shopping Center.

In the Tuesday, Nov. 10, 1964 paper it was reported that groundbreaking ceremonies for Cobb County’s $2.35 million junior college in Kennesaw, now known as Kennesaw State University, were being planned for the following week with Gov. Carl Sanders delivering the principal address.

A second story in that paper announced that officials of the Milwaukee Braves said they would be in Atlanta within the next several days to sign a contract bringing the National League club to Atlanta for the 1966 baseball season. Thomas C. Reynolds, executive vice president of the Braves, said that he and William R. Bartholomay, chairman of the board, planned to sign a lease for Atlanta’s new $18 million stadium. Currently, the Atlanta Braves are leaving Atlanta for a new stadium in the Cumberland area of Cobb County that will be completed in 2017.

Australia was reported in the Thursday, Nov. 12, 1964 paper as wanting to buy a dozen C-130E planes from Lockheed-Georgia Co. Prime Minister Robert G. Menzies, in a statement on the government’s reassessment of defense needs in the Australian House of Representatives, revealed that “approval has been given to acquire 12 C-130E Aircraft.” The C-130E was manufactured at the Marietta plant and was a four-propjet transport in worldwide use by eight nations at the time and was also expected to go into service in New Zealand.

20 years ago …

With historic Republican gains in the House, east Cobb Rep. Newt Gingrich was reported in the Thursday, Nov. 10, 1994 paper as being in line to fulfill his longtime ambition of becoming Speaker of the House – the third Georgian to hold that office.

Saying that “His bed is made … so he’s going to have to lie in it,” a Cobb Superior Court judge ruled in the Friday, Nov. 11, 1994 paper that Fred Tokars would not receive public money to pay for defense expert witnesses and investigators. Tokars was facing charges of ordering the shotgun slaying of his wife, Sara Tokars, nearly two years earlier. His attorneys had asked the court to grant indigent status for their client, claiming that he was broke.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

comments (0)
view/post comments
no comments yet

The Week of Nov. 6
by Damon_Poirier
November 08, 2014 04:00 AM | 3700 views | 0 0 comments | 212 212 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at WWI, Lockheed, septic tanks, voter turnout, Wheeler High School and the Christian Coalition.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, Nov. 6, 1914 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story about Turkey having joined the side of Germany and Austria in “the great European war,” what we know refer to as World War I. It was also reported that Italy and Greece were expected to join the side of the Allies. The German forces in Belgium that were believed to be trying to reach the seacoast in order to prepare for an attack on England had failed. Strong re-enforcements were being rushed to both sides in Belgium. The English battleship fleet was said to have been a strong factor in preventing the Germans from reaching the seacoast.

Also in that edition, half of the front page was taken up by a T.L. Wallace Clothing Co. ad announcing “Cold Wave Coming – Buy Your Overcoat Now.” The store was selling overcoats from $5 to $18.75 and sweaters from $1.35 to $5.

50 years ago …

A Marietta couple and an Acworth truck driver were reported killed in the Sunday, Nov. 1, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal after a head-on collision on the 4-Lane, now known as U.S. Highway 41, near White Circle.

Also that day, it was reported that Lockheed Aircraft Corp., together with its major subsidiaries, topped the nation’s defense contracts list during fiscal 1963 with awards totaling more than $1.5 billion. It marked the second year in a row that the firm had been the No. 1 defense contractor from a dollar volume standpoint.

Another story in that paper reported that overflowing septic tanks had become a major health hazard in Cobb County and threatened thousands of people. County health authorities claimed that with every rainstorm, leakage began in countless improperly-installed septic tanks and polluted pools formed on the lawns of homes. The conditions were threatening disease, making living uncomfortable and undermining property values in many residential areas, according to county public health engineer J.M. Womack.

In the Monday, Nov. 2, 1964 paper it was reported that 40,000 Cobb County residents were expected to vote on candidates ranging from the presidency of the United States to justices of the peace in Cobb County. A massive, record turnout was expected in Cobb and the nation in response to one of the bitterest presidential campaigns ever held.

The following day, Tuesday, Nov. 3, 1964, reported that nearly 15,000 people completed voting by noon – a strong indication that predictions of a record turnout would come true. Lengthy lines began to gather as early as 5:30 a.m. at some sites.

Sen. Barry Goldwater was reported in the Wednesday, Nov. 4, 1964 paper as having scored a resounding victory in the historic Democratic stronghold of Cobb County as he led a Republican revolt across the Deep South. Sen. Goldwater’s lead over President Lyndon Johnson of more than 4,000 votes was insurmountable with 28 of the county’s 29 precincts counted. It was confounding to historians that traditionally Democratic Georgia went Republican to the presidential race for the first time and forever-Republican states like Maine and Vermont turned Democratic.

Bids were reported in the Friday, Nov. 6, 1964 paper as expected to open in a week for the construction of the modern Joseph Wheeler High School in east Cobb – one of two new Cobb County high schools. Architect Cleveland Call released the model drawing of the facility located on Holt Road across the street from East Cobb Junior High School. The building, 92,000 square feet, was to have room for 750 students, be an air-conditioned facility with nine classrooms, five business education rooms, four science rooms, two home economics areas, shops, a library, a cafeteria – kitchen, administrative offices and a complete gymnasium. Wheeler High and a second school in Smyrna were expected to be finished by the start of school in 1965.

20 years ago …

In the Saturday, Nov. 5, 1994 MDJ it was reported that not all Cobb churches were falling in line when it came to distributing a voter guide orchestrated by the Christian Coalition, according to a random survey conducted by the newspaper. Of the 15 Cobb churches contacted, at least four said they were not going to distribute the guide, four said that they were and the rest would not go on record. The coalition’s aim had been to distribute up to 1.5 million copies statewide.

One of the most vocal critics of the effort was the Rev. Scott May, pastor of St. James Episcopal Church in Marietta. Rev. May said he was aware of the controversy and wanted his church to stay out of partisan politics. He also was critical of the Coalition’s effort to mobilize an army of conservative Christian voters.

Cobb’s largest church, however, Roswell Street Baptist Church, was reported as giving out the guide after services earlier in the week. Rev. Dr. Nelson Price stated that Roswell Street Baptist did not endorse candidates or tell the congregation how to vote. He said that the guide was strictly an informational tool for church members.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

comments (0)
view/post comments
no comments yet

page 1 .. 2 3 
5 .. 16 
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, and spam will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides