MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at World War I, a shooting, integration, a fire and a bank robbery.
September 13, 2014 04:00 AM | 73127 views | 0 0 comments | 2417 2417 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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The Week of November 15th
by Damon_Poirier
November 15, 2012 08:00 AM | 1425 views | 1 1 comments | 43 43 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at the death of a local Confederate veteran, the possibility of Glover Park being bulldozed for a parking garage and the sale of the Cobb County Recreation Center in Kennesaw to the Pinetree Country Club.

100 years ago …

On the front page of the Friday, Nov. 15, 1912 Marietta Journal and Courier had a story about the death of Alex Gann, a Cobb County native born in 1846. Gann was just a boy when he entered the Civil War with Lee’s Battalion. He was later discharged with the cavalry at Macon. After the war, he returned to Cobb and settled in Smyrna.

Another front page story in that week’s edition reported that Ensign King Awtrey of Marietta had sent a telegram to his parents telling them that he had been transferred to the battleship Tennessee, which was sailing to the scene of war between the nations of Serbia and Turkey. The Tennessee was to protect Americans who lived in Turkey.

50 years ago …

The Cobb Advisory Board in the Monday, Nov. 12, 1962 MDJ was expected to meet and take up proposals to fireproof the courthouse. Marietta Fire Inspector Capt. Bartow Adair said that the courthouse needed a sprinkler system, a fire escape leading from the rear of the second floor to the ground and a changing of the doors so that they opened outward.

The City of Marietta in the Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1962 paper was reported as having the authority to implement a citizens’ committee recommendation that Glover Park in the Marietta Square be replaced with a two-level business and vehicle parking building.

City Clerk Al Bagley said a 1953 amendment to the city charter gave the mayor and council power to appoint a three-man Parking Authority. The 40-member Citizen’s Advisory Committee’s plan called for erecting a building with the lower level for lease to businesses and the upper level for parking of cars on the entire block that was occupied by the public park.

Those plans were obviously not put into motion, since Glover Park is still standing today.

In the Friday, Nov. 16, 1962 paper, a group of Atlanta investors bought the 600-acre Cobb County Recreation Center near Kennesaw for nearly $1.4 million. Plans were to convert it into a private country club of about 1,000 members by 1963. Jesse Draper, president of Pinetree Corp., said that a $250,000 clubhouse would be built along with tennis courts.

The Rec Center – which included an 18-hole golf course and a swimming pool – was being sold because it had been operating in the red since opening in June 1960.

20 years ago …

Lt. Gov. Pierre Howard said in the Tuesday, Nov. 10, 1992 MDJ that he would make term limits for state legislators and top state officials the cornerstone of his legislative package for 1993, but he backpedaled on an earlier proposal to also mandate term limits for Georgia congressmen. Howard’s comments were made during the state Chamber of Commerce’s Pre-Legislature Forum and drew support from several Cobb legislators.

Also, that day, the Cobb commissioners were reported as set to begin searching through dusty files that once belonged to the late Ernest Barrett for potentially sensitive information on people still working for the county. Barrett, who was the commission chairman from 1965-1984, died a few months after he left office.

After his death, his secretary dated the cardboard boxes of papers for destruction in 1992. Instead of destroying the papers, the county sent them to Kennesaw State College’s history department to be kept in a rare-books room for students to research the important time period of extreme rapid growth in both population and economic development in Cobb.

However, when the commission learned that the boxes contained personnel files, original property records and sealed envelopes, they were quickly taken back to the county clerk’s office.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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Carol Poirier
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January 13, 2013
I thoroughly enjoyed reading Damon's articles on the MDJ Time Capsule. Keep up the good work! - Carol

The Week of November 8th
by Damon_Poirier
November 07, 2012 10:20 AM | 1399 views | 0 0 comments | 47 47 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at the election of a president, the nuclear fallout protection of a local school and a large moonshine raid.

100 years ago …

The front page of the Friday, Nov. 8, 1912 Marietta Journal and Courier had a large story about Woodrow Wilson being elected the 28th President of the United States. Wilson carried about 40 states, while former Presidents Theodore Roosevelt (26th) carried only five states and William Howard Taft (27th) carried three states.

There was also a half-page ad on the front of that week’s paper from the Chamber of Commerce announcing that it had taken on new life with new officers and wanted a new and up-to-date Marietta. The ad also extended a welcome to women who wanted to be a part of the organization.

50 years ago …

On the heels of the Cuban missile crisis, South Cobb High School Principal Robert Lee, Austell area Civil Defense director Lewis Chestnut and Lt. Col. Truman Gray, an English teacher, were reported in the Sunday, Nov. 4, 1962 MDJ as having initiated plans for providing fallout protection for students in case of nuclear disaster.

The school building, which had previously been found to only have 20-percent protection against radiation, was thought that it could be made 100-percent safe by sandbagging windows and doorways. Areas designated for the sandbag reinforcement included the band area, boiler room and an area of hallway in the central part of the school. Lee said that the county had agreed to provide 600 filled sandbags for the project.

Also that day, lawmen reportedly raided a home in Mableton which they suspected was the center of a giant moonshine operation. Officers arrested three people, confiscated four vehicles and seized 612 gallons of non-tax-paid whiskey.

Federal, state and Cobb County sheriff’s officers had watched the home for more than a week before moving in with the raid. Sheriff Kermit Sanders also said that it was the largest moonshine business found in the area in several years.

In the Monday, Nov. 5, 1962 paper, approximately 450 cartons of cigarettes, identified as part of the $11,000 cigarette burglary at Marietta’s Veach Grocery Company in August, was found by Cobb and Cherokee County officers in a home near Woodstock.

A total of 4,200 cartons of cigarettes, mentioned in a previous column, had been stolen from Veach and part of that haul had been dumped in a pine thicket in Woodstock. Officers found about 150 cartons hidden in a room within the home and another 300 cartons inside a dry abandoned well in the backyard.

Some 300 people were also reported that day as having purchased tickets for the evening’s Democratic “loyalty dinner” in Marietta. The dinner was being held to draw further attention to candidates who had Republican opposition in the upcoming general election. Gov. Ernest Vandiver, the main speaker, and Governor – nominee Carl Sanders were expected to lambast the Republican Party at Larry Bell Auditorium.

The Marietta School Board was reported in the Friday, Nov. 9, 1962 paper as having expressed dissatisfaction the night before in a long-standing agreement which allowed all black high school students in Cobb County to attend the city’s Lemon Street High School. Board members, citing severe overcrowdedness at the school, called for negotiations with Cobb County School Superintendent Jasper Griffin for possible sharp “revision” to the agreement.

20 years ago …

The Galleria Centre, Cobb’s convention center under construction at the Galleria Specialty Mall, was reported in the Tuesday, Nov. 3, 1992 MDJ as being a year away from completion but had already booked its first event. The Cobb Chamber of Commerce announced that the National Sheriffs’ Association, based in Alexandria, Va., would hold its national convention there in June 1997.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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The Week of November 1st
by Damon_Poirier
November 01, 2012 10:30 AM | 1504 views | 0 0 comments | 52 52 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at a Marietta mayor’s pay, a “safe-cracker” called in by the tax commissioner’s office, the dedication of Marietta High School’s new wing and a music student’s discovery that changed how a famous composer’s symphony was played forever.

100 years ago…

On the front page of the Friday, Nov. 1, 1912 Marietta Journal and Courier, there was an interesting strip of text just under the masthead that read:

“Next Tuesday, Woodrow Wilson, a Democrat, a true Southerner, a former Georgian, will be elected President of the United States by the most overwhelming majority ever given a candidate for the Presidency in the history of the Republic. Be sure your vote is recorded for this great American.”

Beneath the strip there was a story that talked about two Wilson rallies set for the next evening where a message from Gov. Wilson would be read and speeches would be made by various well-known citizens.

There was also a front page story about the death of attorney Robert Norris Holland, 52, who served two terms as Mayor of Marietta and two terms in the Georgia Legislature.

Another story announced that Cobb County once again won the first prize for the best agricultural exhibit at the Georgia State Fair. The award was announced from the front of the Agricultural Hall and thousands cheered for Mr. and Mrs. J. Gid Morris of Smyrna, who for several years had had the prize exhibit of the fair.

50 years ago…

The Georgia Supreme Court said that Marietta Mayor Sam Welsch could start collecting his salary again in the Wednesday, Oct. 31, 1962 paper. The high court reached the decision in a split 5-2 vote and held that a “taxpayer’s suit,” which sought a permanent injunction cutting off all the mayor’s income should have been thrown out by a lower court.

At issue was the validity of a city council resolution passed the previous February which hiked the mayor’s pay from $3,600 to $11,000 a year and made it retroactive for two years.

Red-faced officials at the tax commissioner’s office were reported as having to call a professional “safe-cracker” in the Friday, Nov. 2, 1962 paper when the combination dial lock on their 50-year old stand up safe refused to open.

Also that day, there was a story about a presentation to county officials about long-range plans for a rapid transit system of electric rail that would begin in Cobb in the early 1970s. Plans called for the rapid transit system, funneling into the heart of Atlanta from Cobb and other counties using a system of underground subways.

20 years ago…

The dedication of Marietta High School’s new wing, which was attached to the rest by a skywalk across Polk Street, was in the Monday, Oct. 26, 1992 MDJ. The three-level structure included a new two-court gymnasium, 12 classrooms and large rooms for the band and choral groups.

Kennestone Hospital was asking a Cobb judge in the Wednesday, Oct. 28, 1992 paper to order state health officials to give the hospital a certificate of need to allow the practice of open-heart surgery.

In the Sunday, Nov. 1, 1992 paper, there was a story about a music student from Mableton who made a discovery that changed forever the way a famous 180-year old symphony was performed. Baroque composer Felix Mendelssohn (1809-1847) wrote the Italian Symphony, a favorite of symphony orchestras, during a trip to Italy in 1834. But, the piece was not published until after his death by the heirs to his estate.

A century and a half later, Duke University music student Michael Cooper, who graduated from South Cobb High in 1980, found the mistake the Mendelssohn family made. Presented to the public was a version of the symphony, originally called Symphony in A Major, which was later revised by the composer. The revision, however, had been thought to be only an early draft until Cooper discovered that it was actually the composer’s attempt to rework the music.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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The 50th Anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis
by Damon_Poirier
October 26, 2012 08:00 AM | 2418 views | 0 0 comments | 54 54 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
Five decades ago, the world watched a showdown between President John F. Kennedy and Soviet Premier Nikita Khruschev during the height of the Cold War in what many feared might spark nuclear Armageddon.

The 13-day long affair came about after American spy planes discovered the Cuban and Soviet governments had been secretly building bases on Cuba for nuclear missiles with the ability to strike much of the continental U.S.

President Kennedy set up a military blockade of the island nation, announced that the U.S. would not permit the Soviets to deliver anymore weapons and ordered the removal of those all ready in place. Premier Khrushchev, however, balked at the demands.

In this extra appearance of Time Capsule, we take a day by day look at the local crisis-related coverage as the tensions between the two nations grew.

Tuesday, Oct. 23 …

The possibility that some Naval Reservists and Air National Guardsmen might be called to active duty was reported. But, spokesmen for both the Naval Air Station and the Air Reserve Dixie Wing said no local units had been alerted.

Civil Defense officials said that there was a mild spurt of interest in fallout shelter construction and evacuation procedures.

Howard Atherton, chairman of the Marietta City Council Civil Defense Committee, advised citizens to acquaint themselves with the dangers of nuclear fallout and how to safeguard against it. Literature on fallout shelters and other civil defense procedures were being made available to the public at the reception desk of the Marietta Police Department.

Wednesday, Oct. 24 …

CD offices reported many calls from residents inquiring about shelter facilities and what would be done with their children at school in an emergency.

Another story reported that there was no plan for mass evacuation of Cobb County in the event of an enemy attack alert. Probable use of missiles instead of manned bombers meant that the population would have very little advance warning if the enemy attacked.

Cobb CD Chief Norman Shipley was quoted as saying that the best plan for residents was to seek shelter in their homes and find the best spot to avoid radiation.

Thursday, Oct. 25 …

Seventh District Rep. John W. Davis said government briefs told him there was evidence that Cuba had not stopped building launching sites for medium-range missiles despite President Kennedy’s warning.

The congressman was one of many from nine southern states who attended a secret briefing in Atlanta. The briefing was conducted by Assistant Secretary of State Fred Dutton and Assistant Secretary of Defense David E. McGiffert.

At 9:20 a.m. that morning, an Air Force C137 jet landed at Dobbins Air Force Base and deposited Georgia Democrats Sen. Richard B. Russell and Rep. Carl Vinson back from crisis briefings in Washington. Both men reportedly left the base hurriedly.

Directors of the county’s five civil defense organizations were expected to meet that evening in order to plan for closer cooperation in light of the crisis.

Section chiefs of the Cobb County CD unit were reported to have met the night before to review their emergency plan. The session was held at the request of Adjutant General George Hearn, head of the state civil defense.

Friday, Oct. 26 …

Sandbagging operations began on a special emergency headquarters for the city of Marietta and Cobb County CD organizations. The location was in the underground basement of the Marietta city fire station at 500 Haynes Street. An extra telephone cable was laid giving it three telephone outlets. Three remote control radio positions were also to be added.

A full page ad published by the Cobb County Chamber of Commerce shared information about constructing family fallout shelters and included a shelter checklist for food/cooking equipment, supplies/equipment for sanitation and general shelter equipment.

Sunday, Oct. 28 …

A recommendation that a big underground water reservoir, safe from nuclear fallout and constructed inside Cobb, was put to the Cobb-Marietta Water Authority. The proposal asked if the tank could be built in conjunction with the new water purification plant that was being planned on Lake Allatoona.

Monday, Oct. 29 …

The 445th Troop Carrier Wing, with headquarters at Dobbins Air Force Base, was busy trying to get squared away after a call to active duty the day before. Many were asking whether the call would be canceled due to peaceful developments in the crisis, but spokesmen said there were no indications that the call-up would be canceled.

The Cobb CD council began recruiting block wardens – like the helmeted, flashlight carrying wardens of World War II. A spokesman said the wardens would be provided with CD information in an emergency and be responsible for disseminating that information within their districts.

A poll by the MDJ of several county residents on Russia’s backing down in the crisis said that they felt the crisis was not over.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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The Week of October 25th
by Damon_Poirier
October 24, 2012 08:00 AM | 1618 views | 0 0 comments | 53 53 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at a Fire Chief injured in a South Cobb blaze, an “error” during a World Series Braves game and a protest against the speech of a Holocaust theorist.

100 years ago …

There were a pair of large ads on the front page of the Friday, Oct. 25, 1912 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier. The first announced a Baby Show at the Princess Theatre that was happening that day. First prize for either a boy or a girl was $10 in gold and the second prize was a solid gold necklace for a girl or a sterling silver, gold-lined drinking cup for a boy. The other ad announced the Civic League’s Halloween Carnival on Oct. 31 at the Kennesaw House.

There was also a front page story that week about Allen, Coggins and Heard, Funeral Directors – a new funeral home business that was being organized in Marietta. The parlors were located in the Austin building at the corner of Powders Springs and Anderson streets.

50 years ago …

Weeks after the Sept. 12 Democratic primary, Marietta attorney Bob Flournoy was confirmed as the nominee for Cobb’s bracket three state representative post in the Sunday, Oct. 21, 1962 MDJ. The recount committee declared Flournoy the winner by 120 votes over Lockheed engineer Ed Harris.

Also that day, there was a story about how Blair Aluminum Furniture Company, which began making three pieces of aluminum office furniture in 1945, swiftly changed hands. Joel H. Golden, vice president of the Metalstand Co. of Phildelphia came to visit L.M. “Rip” Blair in his office. Within an hour they had agreed to a selling price of close to a quarter of a million dollars.

In the Thursday, Oct. 25, 1962 paper, South Cobb Fire District Chief James Dunn was reported as being injured after having tumbled down a flight of stairs while fighting a fire at a home being built at Hurt and Austell roads. Chief Dunn suffered cuts and bruises after he slipped on the burnt attic steps and fell to the ground floor amongst hot timbers and other debris.

A federal agency was reported as having given the Cobb-Marietta Water Authority the go-ahead to construct a million-dollar water purification plant on Lake Allatoona in the Friday, Oct. 26, 1962 paper. The proposed plant was to be built in stages. After construction of the first stage, which would have an eight million gallon capacity, additional stages would be added until a maximum of 24 million gallons per day output was achieved.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, Oct. 20, 1992 MDJ, some Marines from Naval Air Station-Atlanta got caught in the middle of an unintentional flag flap before the second World Series game between the Braves and the Toronto Blue Jays – the first team from outside the U.S. to play in baseball’s championship series.

The Marines from Marine Air Group 42 at NAS-Atlanta in Marietta were a seven-man color guard that carried the Canadian flag upside down onto the field at Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium. Braves officials who gave the Marines the flag acknowledged the error in the second inning and issued an apology to the people of Canada and baseball fans.

It was reported that more than 25 protestors disrupted Holocaust theorist David Irving’s speech at the Smyrna Community Center which was sponsored by the Atlanta organization known as the Committee for Historical Review in the Wednesday, Oct. 21, 1992 paper.

Irving, a British author and lecturer, spoke to about 75 people at the event. He proposed that the Holocaust was not systematic genocide directed by Adolf Hitler and that gas chambers probably didn’t exist. Irving, who had been banned from entering several countries – including Canada – was protested inside and outside the community center by demonstrators.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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The Week of October 18th
by Damon_Poirier
October 18, 2012 08:00 AM | 1852 views | 0 0 comments | 53 53 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at an FBI investigation into all county law enforcement, a proposed Halloween vandalism ordinance, the purchase of the Kennesaw House and the merger of Kennestone and Cobb hospitals.

100 years ago…

There was a front page story in the Friday, Oct. 18, 1912 Marietta Journal and Courier about traveling salesman W.W. Linzy of Birmingham, Ala., offering up $5,000 when he learned that funds were being raised to build a new up-to-date hotel in Marietta.

Formerly in the hotel business, Linzy not only agreed to take stock in the company, but also offered to manage the hotel.

Another front page story was about the Marietta Boy Scouts beating the Atlanta Boy Scouts in a one-sided football game, 25-0, in Marietta.

50 years ago…

In the Sunday, Oct. 14, 1962 MDJ it was revealed that all law enforcement officers in Cobb were being fingerprinted and subjected to an FBI investigation. Marietta Mayor Sam Welsh disclosed at a city council meeting that the Cobb Grand Jury – which was looking into the quality of law enforcement – had requested the probe of backgrounds for all city and county police as well as sheriff’s deputies.

The smallest voter turnout for a contested election in at least 12 years was reported in the Wednesday, Oct. 17, 1962 paper. Only 19-percent of the county’s registered and eligible 33,375 voters went to the polls.

Voters named Edward S. Kendrick, an audio visual aids director for Cobb County Schools, as the senator for Cobb’s new east (32nd) district and Kyle Yancey, a Mableton attorney, as the senator for the new west (33rd) district. As stated in a previous column, this was the first time that the county did not have to share a senator with two neighboring counties.

The Marietta City Council, in the Thursday, Oct. 18, 1962 paper, refused to pass an ordinance curbing Halloween vandalism despite a plea by Councilman John Carney that the situation had been “getting out of hand.”

Carney proposed that the city adopt an ordinance which would limit the masked celebrators who paraded the streets and keep trick or treaters to fifth grade or younger. However, the seven-man council went with the view of Councilman Howard Atherton who said such an ordinance would be “unenforceable.”

Also that day, there was a story about two Cobb county escapees, which fled from separate work gangs, who remained at large after one of them fought a series of gun battles and stole at least four cars in a desperate flight for freedom the day before. Police said several wild chases were touched off during the afternoon and overnight when one of the convicts was spotted at various points in both Cobb and Fulton counties.

20 years ago…

More Georgians wanted the lottery than not, according to polls in the Monday, Oct. 12, 1992 MDJ. Ironically, those who were closest to the issue, namely educators, were among those who were most solidly against the proposed constitutional amendment, which voters would vote upon on Nov. 3.

Another story that day was how the Downtown Marietta Development Authority was one step closer to owning the historic Kennesaw House. Authority lawyer Bill Robertson said Petrous & Co. of Boston had agreed to the $525,000 sale price, but the deal had not yet been closed. Petrous & Co. acquired the property in a foreclosure on a $1.4 million mortgage it held.

In the Friday, Oct. 16, 1992 paper, Kennestone Hospital and Cobb Hospital Medical Center were expected to merge services within six months following an agreement reached between the two hospitals’ governing boards. For the most part, the merger would allow the hospitals to cut costs and pass some savings on to consumers.

There was also a story that day about the state Board of Regents deciding to buy 30 acres of land for parking at Kennesaw State College even though board members said they were uncertain how much the land was worth.

The 30-acre tract was to the east of the 150-acre campus, between Steve Frey Road and Interstate 75 near the Chastain Road exit. The state Legislature the year before appropriated $2.5 million to buy the land and build a parking lot. The college had been plagued by a lack of adequate parking for its then 11,000-plus students.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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The Week of October 4th
by Damon_Poirier
October 17, 2012 04:06 PM | 1606 views | 0 0 comments | 60 60 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

In this week’s Time Capsule, we look at the visit of a former President, a brazen bank robbery on the Marietta Square and a cleanup of several hundred containers of toxic waste.

100 years ago …

Former President Theodore Roosevelt’s passing through Marietta on his way from Atlanta to Chattanooga was in the Friday, Oct. 4, 1912 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier. Roughly 500 people gathered at the depot to get a glimpse of the Bull Moose candidate for the 1912 Presidential election during a brief stop.

When his train arrived, Roosevelt came out onto the rear car’s platform and shook hands with the folks that could reach him. Local supporter, C.C. Coyle was noted as being kept busy lifting children up to shake Col. Roosevelt’s hand.

While Roosevelt did not make a speech, the story stated that he remembered Marietta was the home of Sen. Alexander Stephens Clay and spoke of him as an unusually fine type of man.

On the heels of Marietta Mayor J.J. Black’s letter the previous week, City Clerk W. M. Fleming placed four ads scattered about the front page of that week’s paper reminding city residents to pay their 1912 city taxes by Oct. 20.

Another ad that appeared across the bottom half of the front page was for The Gem Theater. It announced in addition to the regular daily program that a new film, “The Animated Daily,” would feature special events every day on items from around the country. Admission was a nickel and a dime, which was a steal compared to today’s average movie ticket price of $8.

50 years ago …

The carving of the county into east and west state senate districts was in the MDJ’s Monday, Oct. 1, 1962 edition. The decision agreed upon by Cobb County’s state Reps. Bill Teague, Harold Willingham and Joe Mack Wilson was set to be incorporated into a bill reapportioning the state Senate. Up until this point, Cobb had shared a single senator with two neighboring counties.

In the Tuesday, Oct. 2, 1962 MDJ, a fisherman discovered 201 cartons of cigarettes dumped in a pine thicket near Woodstock in Cherokee County which was identified as part of an $11,000 burglary of the Veach Company. A total of 4,200 cartons of cigarettes had been stolen from Veach, a grocery warehouse near the Marietta Square, in late August. Sheriff Kermit Sanders’ detectives theorized that “heat” from that investigation caused the burglars to dump part of their haul in haste.

Also on that day, lawmen seized $7,400 in what they said were counterfeit $20 bills and arrested two people in a pre-dawn raid at a motel on U.S. 41 just south of the Marietta city limits. Federal treasury agents charged the Florida couple with possession of counterfeit cash, while local authorities charged them with carrying a concealed pistol in the glove compartment of their car.

On Thursday, Oct. 4, 1962, there was a pair of front page articles about a bold bandit who grabbed $15,500 from the First National Bank in the heart of downtown Marietta after he held a stick of dynamite against a teller’s face. Investigators said that the dynamite was fixed with a percussion cap and was set to explode if touched off by the robber, who drove away from the scene in a nearby car.

The robbery occurred shortly after the off-duty city police officer, who usually stood guard on the sidewalk during banking hours, had been lured away by a phony telephone call that the police chief wanted to see him.

This was the first time that the Marietta First National Bank had been robbed in the 62 years it had been located on the corner of South Park Square and Powder Springs Street.

20 years ago …

It was reported in the Thursday, Oct. 1, 1992 MDJ that vandals hit the Marietta Square for the fourth time in two weeks. Painted racial and anti-Semitic slogans were found on the statue of Sen. Alexander Stephens Clay and other areas of Glover Park.

Also, that day, the Marietta City Council voted 4-1 to take the battle over a business license for the Cyprus Lounge, a nude dance club, to the Georgia Supreme Court. The city, nine months earlier, had refused an adult-entertainment business license to the owner because the business was too close to the Noonday Baptist Association’s offices. The city’s adult-entertainment law forbids such clubs to be within 1,000-feet of a church.

On Friday, Oct. 2, 1992, there was a story about a $169,000 Superfund cleanup that began in November 1991 at an abandoned oil and antifreeze recycling center in Marietta. The EPA stated that they expected to be finished in roughly 30 days. Officials were in the final process of removing several hundred containers of toxic chemicals. When EPA investigators first checked the facility, they had found more than 300 drums and 30 large tanks filled with toxic chemicals that included oil, antifreeze, acids and solvents.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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The Week of October 11th
by Damon_Poirier
October 11, 2012 08:00 AM | 1825 views | 0 0 comments | 65 65 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink
In this week’s Time Capsule, we look again at the bank robbery of First National Bank on the Marietta Square, the shooting of a police chief and the beginning of South Cobb’s Silver Comet Trail.

100 years ago…

The entire front page of the Friday, Oct. 11, 1912 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier had an ad from Henry A. Ward regarding his “Fall Campaign” listing of various goods and prices available at his store. Some of the items listed included infant shoes at 39-cents a pair, gray sox and stockings for men and women at three pair for 25-cents, and 500-yards worth of cotton flannel at five cents a yard.

There was also a story about the completion of two new steel and concrete bridges into Fulton County. The story mentioned that a resolution had been passed by the Board of Commissioners stating that future expenses of repairing all bridges between Cobb and Fulton would be pro-rated between the two counties based on their taxable values. This meant that Fulton would pay the larger share since it was valued more than Cobb.

Another story that week mentioned how the first brick in the foundation of the new school house on Haynes Street was laid by Col. D.W. Blair, who was the president of the Board of Education.

50 years ago…

In the Sunday, Oct. 7, 1962 MDJ there was another story about the robbery at the First National Bank on the Marietta Square. The bank teller, who suffered a severe shock after the incident, was confined to the hospital for three days and placed under heavy sedation.

The robber, a man described as over six-feet tall and about 240 pounds, was reported as wearing a suit, sunglasses and a hat pulled low on his forehead. During the robbery, he shoved what later turned out to be a railroad flare through the teller’s rollout drawer. Like the teller, police were initially fooled by the railroad fuse and assumed it was dynamite as the robber claimed.

Police also learned that the car seen leaving the scene after the robbery was not the robber, but a man who had actually been at the bank during the robbery on business.

It was reported on the front page of the Monday, Oct. 8, 1962 paper that a smouldering fire of an undetermined origin destroyed the Southern Bell Telephone and Telegraph Warehouse on North Fairground Street. The fire, which happened the day before, went undetected until the east wall of the concrete storage building had collapsed.

Also on the front page that day was a story about Acworth Police Chief Earl Stone who was wounded by a shotgun blast while he was patrolling alone along School Street in an Acworth neighborhood over the weekend.

Chief Stone narrowly escaped death when the shotgun blast ripped into the right-hand side of the patrol car from a short distance away. Most of the pellets hit a few inches below the open window, but a few entered the car and struck him in the face, arm and hand.

The chief said the shooting was possibly connected with recent arrests in the area on various charges including bootleg whiskey operations.

20 years ago…

The arrest of two brothers in the Tuesday, Oct. 6, 1992 MDJ, put an end to the largest bootleg-tape operation in the county’s history. More than 150,000 bootleg rap and rhythm and blues tapes were confiscated from an east Cobb home and a nearby mini-warehouse. Police said the tapes had been destined for flea markets, truck stops and open-air markets around the state.

Environmentalists and South Cobb residents who were trying to turn property seized from a convicted drug dealer into a nature center said in the Wednesday, Oct. 7, 1992 paper that a compromise proposal was being considered by the federal government, which wanted the site to be used as a drug-education summer camp. The 35-acre site on Lake Careco near Six Flags Drive had originally been offered to Cobb County by the Justice Department.

In the Sunday, Oct. 11, 1992 paper, the Georgia Rails Into Trails Society celebrated the state’s recent purchase of a 12-mile abandoned rail line in Powder Springs with a parade and a ceremonial passing of the rail line’s deed.

The state DOT acquired the 34-mile abandoned Seaboard Airline Railroad corridor between the Edna community in Cobb County and Rockmart in Paulding County from CSX to “bank” the route for future transportation needs. The rail line, which had 12 miles in South Cobb, would later be transformed into today’s paved multi-use Silver Comet Trail.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com. 

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The Week of September 27th
by Damon_Poirier
September 27, 2012 08:00 AM | 1935 views | 1 1 comments | 80 80 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

For several years, I was responsible for a feature called “A Look Back.”

This feature, geared to a specific city in Cobb each day, was a few inches on events that occurred in the archives five, 10 and 25 years earlier. The editors retired the feature during a redesign of the paper.

Last week, Internet Editor Chris Bailey and this author decided to revive the feature in a weekly column on countywide events starting with 100, 50 and 20 years ago.

100 years ago…

Starting with the Friday morning, Sept. 27, 1912 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier, which was one of two local newspapers that would later merge and become today’s MDJ, there was a letter to the community from Marietta Mayor J.J. Black. Taking up the entire right half of the front page, the letter was addressed “To The Tax Payers of the City of Marietta.” Black spoke of the need for tax payers to pay the 1912 city tax by the Oct. 20 deadline. He also drew attention to the financial statement published in the paper earlier in the year that stated the city’s $17,000 indebtedness.

It also used to be common practice to sell advertising upon the front page. Something that has come around again in the MDJ with front page stickers. Alongside Black’s letter was an ad from the L.W. Rogers Company in Marietta which stated 18 pounds of sugar for a dollar, 25 pounds of sugar for $1.41 and 10 pounds of Snowdrift Lard for $1.15.

There was also a story about W.W. Jolley, a farmer and 60-year resident of Cobb County, who came by the paper’s offices with a copy of the Daily Citizen, a Confederate newspaper published in Vicksburg, Miss., on July 2, 1863. The Daily Citizen, printed upon the blank side of wallpaper, was still good except for creases made by folding. The publication was printed during the Siege of Vicksburg and ridiculed the boast of Gen. Ulysses S. Grant that he intended to celebrate the Fourth of July by dining in Vicksburg.

Another interesting story within the Sept. 27 edition talked about how a 44-page, illustrated booklet, titled, “Cobb, the Banner County, and Marietta, the Gem City, of Georgia, The Empire State of the South,” was ready for distribution to the public. Prepared by Moultrie M. Sessions and published for the Chamber of Commerce, the booklet contained scenery and buildings within the county next to facts about the local soil, climate, industries and businesses. Some locations listed were the Belmont Poultry Farm, the Kennesaw Mountain Dairy and the J.T. Anderson farm.

50 years ago…

On Sunday, Sept. 23, 1962, the MDJ ran a story about Rev. George M. Yates, pastor of the Marietta Church of God, considering the idea of challenging the powers of Rev. Michael Whittamore, a faith healer from Louisville, Ky. The visiting healer had pitched a big circus tent on a vacant lot at Frey’s Gin Road and Wylie Drive for a month long healing campaign. Before 100 people the week before, Whittamore claimed that he had been raised from the dead by a sick bed cure after doctors had “pulled the sheet over” his head and given him up for lost.

The night watchman, who single-handedly captured three men attempting to burglarize the Mableton post office over the weekend, told his story to the MDJ on Monday, Sept. 24, 1962. The watchman said he surprised the men while they were allegedly attempting to force open a safe.

With his pistol still holstered, he managed to catch one of the men behind a desk and another behind a mail sack inside the building. The third was caught in the next room trying to unlock a window to escape. Because there wasn’t a phone in the post office, the trio was marched down Bankhead Highway at gunpoint to an all-night washateria in order to call police.

The recount of the disputed Cobb Democratic primary race between Ed Harris and Bob Flournoy for the nomination to a state House seat was short-lived. The recount was announced on Thursday, Sept. 27, 1962 and the following day’s paper reported it as being suspended indefinitely. George Harris, representing his brother, stated the re-tabulation was not proceeding according to law. Superior Court Judge Virlyn B. Moore of Atlanta, overseeing the recount at the Marietta courthouse, suspended the proceedings so the Harris brothers could research recount law.

Sounding eerily familiar to the CDC’s preparations for bird flu in recent years, there was a story on Sunday, Sept. 30, 1962 about the county bracing itself for the onslaught of Asian flu. Health officials expected a severe outbreak over the winter starting around mid-December. The last widespread epidemic in the country was in the winter of 1959-60 and Cobb was one of the hardest hit areas.

20 years ago…

From wild bears to alligators, the MDJ reported on Sunday, Sept. 27, 1992 that Cobb had some unusual visitors over the past year. Among the creatures showing themselves were bears – which migrated down from the north Georgia mountains – foxes, raccoons, a copperhead snake and a 48-inch long alligator found in a creek behind a Powder Springs house. Another wildlife oddity was discovery of tracks that animal control officials believed was a bobcat.

Cobb government began moving toward relaxing restrictions on produce being sold on county streets on Monday, Sept. 28, 1992. Roadside peddling was not a new concept, but county law restricted it to specific districts and only during normal business hours. The commission voted unanimously to have public hearings in October on whether or not produce stands would be allowed to remain overnight – rather than being dismantled and removed each evening. If approved, stands could remain open as long as the vendor had the permission of the property owner, a business license and did not erect a sign larger than allowed.

Another item up for discussion was the sale of livestock, poultry, wood products and produce within residential areas, but only next to the property on which they were grown providing it was two-acres or larger. This two-acre or larger rule has become something that the backyard chickens movement has been seeking the current commission into revising.

Cobb-based Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co. announced Tuesday, Sept. 29, 1992 that it had been awarded a contract – with a potential value of up to $4.5 billion – to retrofit C-141 StarLifter cargo planes built at the company’s South Cobb Drive assembly plant in Marietta. The C-141 Service Life Extension Program (SLEP) project was expected to add about 85,000 flight hours to the life of each C-141 cargo hauler, which was first manufactured at Lockheed-Georgia Co. in the early 1960s. A total of 284 C-141s were built at the Cobb plant.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages availableIf you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal. 

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Carol Poirier
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September 27, 2012
Great blog...glad to see it and read it. Thank you - Carol

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