MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at Leo Frank, a potential Lockheed strike, a drive-by shooting and a fatal car wreck.
July 21, 2015 10:50 AM | 180724 views | 0 0 comments | 3985 3985 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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The Week of July 23
by Damon_Poirier
July 21, 2015 10:50 AM | 184 views | 0 0 comments | 10 10 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Leo Frank, a potential Lockheed strike, a drive-by shooting and a fatal car wreck.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, July 23, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported Leo M. Frank’ throat was cut by life-term convict William Creen at the State Farm in Milledgeville. The wound was “immediately sewn up by doctors who happened to be close at hand.”

Creen was reported as having “slipped a big butcher knife into his sleeping quarters and when the lights were turned low he stole over to where Frank was sleeping and slashed his throat.” Prison guards were said to have caught Creen before he had time to kill Frank.

♦♦♦

A second story announced that a local 67-year old man was killed by a fast passenger train on the W. & A. Railroad at the crossing near the old Gober marble yard. The man was “absorbed in counting a hand full of money when the engine struck him and threw him with a great force from the track.” While the man’s body was not mangled, his “neck and all his limbs were broken.”

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, July 18, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that officials of the 12,000-member Lockheed-Georgia Company’s local 709 of International Association of Machinists (IAM) had called for a mass membership meeting to discuss contract negotiations and the possibility of a strike vote.

The following day, Monday, July 19, 1965, reported that members voted overwhelmingly to authorize union leaders to call a strike against the company if negotiations for a new contract failed. H.B. Savage, vice president of Local 709, said that 97 percent of the approximately 8,000 workers voting at Sprayberry High School approved the strike authorization that was asked for by union leaders.

Later in the week, on Sunday, July 25, 1965, sources close to the bargaining sessions between union leaders and the company predicted that an agreement on a new contract would be reached before a meeting of union members was held. Reports of a possible contract settlement came the day before following three lengthy sessions during the week between the two at the offices of the Federal Mediation Service in Atlanta.

♦♦♦

With President Lyndon B. Johnson symbolizing the nation’s sorrow, former Governor and UN Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson – whose death was mentioned in last week’s column – was buried in the Illinois prairie that he loved. President Johnson was reported in the Monday, July 19, 1965 paper as leading a band of dignitaries who attend the “simple, 40-minute services in the small, red brick Bloomington Unitarian Church and then watched the burial in the century-old Evergreen Memorial Cemetery.”

♦♦♦

The Smyrna City Council was reported in the Wednesday, July 21, 1965 paper as having asked Cobb Commission Chairman Ernest Barrett to help get an exit ramp from the I-285 Perimeter Highway to Spring Road on the west side of the Four Lane, which is now known as U.S. Highway 41, where the three roads intersect just south of Marietta. Motorists at the time had to come off I-285 on the east side of the Four Lane and cross the entire width of that road to get to Spring Road.

Barrett said that as soon as he received the resolution he would go to the State Highway Department and request the construction of the ramp. He also said the current layout of the area would allow the installation of the ramp at little cost and trouble.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, July 17, 1995 paper, it was reported that Cobb County police were still searching for suspects in the drive-by shooting of a Florida father and his son on Interstate 285 near Vinings, which was mentioned in last week’s column.

The wounded 13-year-old boy told reporters the Saturday before that he feared “knowing they’re still out there.” The young boy spoke to reporters from a wheelchair in a parking lot near then-Promina Kennestone Hospital, where his 38-year-old father remained hospitalized for a gunshot wound to his lower right leg.

The following day, Tuesday, July 18, 1995, it was reported that police had identified one of the four suspects wanted in connection with the shooting and were seeking arrest warrants against the three others. Police identified a 19-year-old black man from southwest Atlanta as being “on the run” and was considered armed and dangerous. He was also said to have made threats that he would shoot police officers if cornered.

Then, on Wednesday, July 19, 1995, the 19-year suspected triggerman in the shooting surrendered in Atlanta with his lawyer.

♦♦♦

Georgia Christian Coalition Chairman Pat Gartland was reported in the Wednesday, July 19, 1995 paper as having resigned his post atop one of Georgia’s most influential advocacy groups to join the presidential campaign of Texas Sen. Phil Gramm.

Gartland, then-51, was the latest Georgia big name to join Sen. Gramm’s bid for the Republican nomination in 1996. Sen. Gramm, a Columbus-native, had at the time endorsements from the majority of Georgia’s congressional delegation and numerous political and business leaders in the state.

♦♦♦

In the Saturday, July 22, 1995 paper, it was reported that five people were killed in a two-car accident on I-75 near the Cobb-Cherokee line that catapulted one car into the air and onto the roof of another.

The Georgia State Patrol and Cherokee County officers said a late-model Toyota driven southbound on the interstate shortly before 3 p.m. the day before went out of control, veered off the road, through a grass median and hit a metal guardrail on the northbound side. The impact flipped the Toyota into the air upside down where it then landed atop a Plymouth Acclaim going north between Wade Green Road and Georgia Highway 92 at the Priest Road overpass. The State Patrol also reported that all five victims suffered massive head injuries.

The incident closed northbound I-75 for about two hours and the resulting traffic jam extended as far as 12 miles to the south on the interstate. Mike Oliver of Traffic Scan Inc., a traffic reporter for STAR 94 FM, said in his four years as an Atlanta traffic reporter that he had never seen a Friday traffic jam that bad.

The following day, Sunday, July 23, 1995, it was reported that the only survivor of the crash, a 10-year-old boy from Henderson, Kentucky, was cleared to go home from Promina Kennestone Hospital. The boy suffered a broken collarbone and cuts on his face from flying glass.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of July 16
by Damon_Poirier
July 17, 2015 12:00 PM | 227 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at the Clark Library, Adlai E. Stevenson, Dobbins, Mars, a bomb threat and a shooting.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, July 16, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported that Marietta resident Gov. Joe M. Brown was among those who addressed the House and Senate’s Western & Atlantic committees opposing any move to prevent the construction of a road paralleling the Western & Atlantic Railroad.

♦♦♦

A second story announced that Frances Crosby Ward, Lena Rivers Giles, Louise Land, Roberta Roberts Rainey, Lorene Duncan, Sarah Frances Martin, Mary Sue Hicks, Herbert Clay Jr., Kingsley Miller, Austin Spence, Tony Carter and Roy Swanson were winners of the dolls in the “Closing Out Sale” for the Henry A. Ward Co. that were mentioned in last week’s column.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, July 11, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that the sale of Marietta’s Clark Library, which was also mentioned in last week’s column, was postponed by the Marietta City Council at the request of a committee from the First Baptist Church.

Joe Kelly, spokesman for the committee, said the church was interested in buying the property, but it did not have the time to take the proper action and make a formal bid. Kelly said that the church had only become aware of the sale two days before and needed a month to get a bid in order.

Marietta Mayor Howard Atherton said that the city was not in a hurry to sell the library and decided to entertain proposals for the building after a good offer was made.

♦♦♦

The death of former Governor and UN Ambassador Adlai E. Stevenson, a two-time Democratic presidential candidate was reported in the Wednesday, July 11, 1965 paper. Stevenson collapsed in a London street and died of an apparent heart attack at the age of 65.

Stevenson, chief U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, was in London on a private visit. He was passing the International Sportsman’s Club on Upper Grosvenor Street in Mayfair near the U.S. Embassy when he collapsed. He was taken by ambulance to St. George’s Hospital near Buckingham Palace where he was later pronounced dead.

♦♦♦

Rep. John Davis was reported in the Thursday, July 16, 1965 paper as pledging his support to a City of Marietta-Cobb County bid to convert Dobbins Air Force Base into a joint military-civilian airport. But, the Congressman added that the feared the success of the bid was slim.

Davis reported that the same proposal was brought to the Federal Aviation Agency two years earlier and it quickly ran head-on into opposition from just about every official involved. He also said that the Navy, the Air Force and the Lockheed-Georgia Company all claimed that the civilian use of Dobbins would interfere with their operations.

♦♦♦

In the Wednesday, July 15, 2015 paper MDJ reporter Hilary Butschek reported on the historic flyby of the New Horizons spacecraft past Pluto after an epic journey from Earth that spanned more than three billion miles and 9½ years. Fifty years ago, in the Friday, July 16, 1965 paper, a similar historic space encounter was reported, this one with one of our closest solar system neighbors - Mars.

U.S. scientists celebrated the first close up pictures which showed a bright desert area and the edge of the mysterious planet. The first image gave no hint as to the Martian terrain, but roughly 20 others were on their way from the Mariner 4 spacecraft and were expected to reveal more features.

The initial photograph, taken by the spacecraft in its fly-by of the planet, took eight hours and 35 minutes to transmit back to tracking stations on Earth. The photo, taken from a distance of about 10,000 miles about Mars, showed features about three miles in length.

20 years ago …

Officers with three local agencies were reported in the Tuesday, July 11, 1995 paper as having searched for more than an hour for two packages containing bombs that a caller claimed were placed outside the Cobb County Justice Center in downtown Marietta. No packages were discovered at the court buildings, which were evacuated along with adjacent buildings just east of the Marietta Square.

The threat was called into 911 by a male on a cellphone just after lunchtime. Officers with Marietta Police, Cobb County Sheriff’s and the Marietta Fire departments searched outside the buildings amongst the shrubs and automobiles as oblivious lunchtime pedestrians walked past them.

♦♦♦

In the Friday, July 14, 1995 paper and for several days afterwards, the MDJ reported on the shooting of a Tennessee man and his 12-year-old son. The pair were shot after two black men in a green, late-model Jeep Wrangler fired four shots into their southbound Winnebago on Interstate 285 in Cobb County before speeding away.

The father was taken to Kennestone Hospital where he underwent surgery for a gunshot wound to the lower right leg. His son, who was shot in the right thigh and in the abdomen, was admitted to Scottish Rite Children’s Hospital in Atlanta.

The following day, it was reported that the search was still on for the suspects. However, the Jeep Wrangler, which had been stolen from Cumberland Mall’s parking lot shortly before the shooting, was found in a heavily wooded area off Bouldercrest Road in DeKalb County.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of July 9
by Damon_Poirier
July 10, 2015 12:45 PM | 293 views | 0 0 comments | 19 19 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Mary Phagan, Kiwanis International, the Clark Library, the Fowler-Marland House and the East-West Connector.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, July 9, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier reported that a large crowd attended the unveiling of the monument erected to 13-year old Mary Phagan, the murder victim in the now infamous Leo Frank case, in the Marietta City Cemetery by the Marietta Camp United Confederate Veterans (U.C.V.) 762.

The unveiling was made by James Sauls, a crippled veteran who was a soldier for four years in the Civil War. Retiring U.C.V. Commander J. Gid Morris was the master of ceremonies and introduced the speakers. Henry Boyd Moss made the formal eulogy for the slain girl, Rev. A.C. Hendley of East Point made a brief address, U.C.V. Chaplain Gazaway Hames made the opening invocation and Dr. Rembert Smith closed with a prayer and benediction.

For more information on the 100th anniversary of the murder and the later lynching of Frank, check out the Sunday, April 28, 2013 story by MDJ News Editor Leo Hohmann – A Pilgrimage for ‘little Mary’ here.

♦♦♦

The entire front page of that edition was taken up with the “Closing Out Sale” ad for the Henry A. Ward Co., which stated that the store would be giving away four 2½-foot tall dolls that normal retailed for $5.

Each newspaper had an individual number stamped underneath the image of a doll. In order to win one of the four free dolls, participants had to bring the full page ad with them to the store and have their number be closest to the numbers on each of the dolls.

♦♦♦

Another story in that edition reported that J.W. Hancock was beginning work on a building upon his Ice Plant property for a modern steam laundry plant. The Journal had learned that J.H. Porter, “an experienced laundry man,” who was “engaged in the business in another city,” would be associated with Hancock.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, July 4, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that Marietta Mayor Howard Atherton said the State Highway Department would probably take “contracts for the widening of Fairground Street sometime in September.”

Plans were to widen Fairground from Roswell Street north to the Four Lane, now known as U.S. Highway 41, into a four-lane thoroughfare. Fairground at the time was already four lanes from Roswell to Lockheed. Mayor Atherton said that plans were 35-percent complete and that “there might be some problem in gaining the right of way to two or three pieces of property.”

♦♦♦

It was reported in the Wednesday, July 7, 1965 paper that Dr. Glenn Reed of Marietta had been elected president-elect of Kiwanis International at the International Kiwanis Convention in New York City. He defeated W. Clyde Glass of Louisville, Kentucky in balloting at the Madison Square Garden event, which was attended by 20,000 Kiwanians.

Reed was to be inducted on Aug. 1 in ceremonies in Chicago. He was to take office as president in July 1966 in Portland, Oregon and expected to direct 275,000 members of the community service organization for business and professional men.

♦♦♦

A photo on the front page of the Friday, July 9, 1965 paper showed the intersection of Old 41 and Georgia 293 in Kennesaw, which was the scene of an unusual traffic accident.

The wreck involved a passenger car and a tractor trailer truck that was carrying two other trucks piggy-back. The image showed the two carried trucks laying on their passenger sides scattered across the intersection. Both drivers were treated at Kennestone Hospital for injuries.

♦♦♦

It was also reported in that paper, that a “For Sale” sign had been placed on Marietta’s Clark Library by the Marietta City Council. Bids for the building and its property, located at the corner of Church and Lemon Streets, were being received by the council.

Built in 1893, the original library was octagonal in shape and had a scale miniature of the main reading room of the British Museum of London. According to retired city librarian Florence Sibley, the building was the only one of its kind in the United States. Money for the construction of the library was given by Sarah Freeman Clark in memory of her father, James Freeman Clark – a renowned New England minister and educator who came to Marietta for his health.

The Clark Library was organized in 1893 with books from the Clark family library, which included many rare books. Some of the more notable pieces were an autographed set of books by Oliver Wendell Holmes and works by Louisa May Alcott. When the library first opened, it had about 5,000 volumes. At the time of its closure, there were approximately 100,000 books in circulation.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, July 3, 1995 paper, 110 Kennesaw homeowners were reported as being “up in arms over a pending request before Cobb commissioners to place the Fowler-Marland House on the Cobb Historic Register.” The homeowners contended that the owners of the property were trying to use the historical designation to “skirt county codes.”

Homeowners in the Dunmovin subdivision charged that the home’s owners, Burt and Elizabeth Marland of Chicago, were attempting to obtain the status so they could turn the property into a bed and breakfast establishment.

Bed and breakfasts were considered a “special exception use” in Cobb County and were not bound by standard zoning. If the house was approved to the county’s historic register it could then be used as a bed and breakfast, providing that it met other requirements.

♦♦♦

A federal judge was reported in the Wednesday, July 5, 1995 paper as having temporarily halted construction on a portion of the controversial East-West Connector through the Concord Covered Bridge District in south Cobb.

U.S. District Court Judge William C. O’Kelley ruled that Cobb County could not begin construction on the nearly 3-mile segment of the connector through the historic district until the court could hear the permanent injunction request by Protect Endangered Areas of Cobb’s History (PEACH). Judge O’Kelley also prohibited the county from accepting any bids on the segment without notifying the court.

The temporary injunction did not preclude the county from continuing work begun in mid-May on the nearly 3-mile, $12 million stretch of the connector from Fontaine Road to South Cobb Drive.

♦♦♦

In the Friday, July 7, 1995 paper, it was reported that Marietta’s ordinance prohibiting alcohol from strip clubs was hit with its second challenge as Boomer’s filed a lawsuit seeking enough money to fund six city budgets. Filed in Cobb Superior Court, the lawsuit was asking for compensatory and punitive damages of at least $165 million if the city enforced the law, which would take effect on Jan. 1, 1996.

Like a similar action filed a month earlier by Club Taj Mahal, the Boomer’s suit named the city and all but one of the individual council members as defendants. Boomers and the Taj Mahal were located within a mile of each other on Cobb Parkway near Windy Hill Road.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of July 2
by Damon_Poirier
July 01, 2015 01:00 PM | 395 views | 0 0 comments | 24 24 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Marines, a cave rescue, Lockheed, an atom smasher and a tornado.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, July 2, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story that reported the Cooperative Cattle Feeders Association of Cobb County was organized at the county courthouse for the purpose of encouraging the feeding of beef cattle in the county during the winter season.

There were nine feeders present that joined the association in addition to the three local banks and the Bank of Powder Springs. The association agreed to take 500 head of cattle and before feeding time came to purchase another 1,000 head of cattle.

50 years ago …

Two Mableton Marines who were killed in a California plane crash over the weekend were reported in the Monday, June 28, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal as having had a premonition of danger when they were home on leave the week before the accident.

According to the mother of one Marine and the sister-in-law of the other, both of the teens had acted as if something bad was going to happen to them. The pair postponed their trip from Cobb County to California four times, finally arriving in San Diego about an hour before their leave was up. Four days later, they were listed among the 84 people killed when an Air Force transport plane crashed into a California mountain.

♦♦♦

A silver identification bracelet was reported in the Tuesday, June 29, 1965 paper as probably saving the life of a 20-year-old Smyrna man who fell 80 feet into Case Cave, an underground cave on Lookout Mountain in Cartersville.

The bracelet apparently caught on a jagged rock as the man fell and broke his fall, which resulted in only minor injuries.

One of the man’s rescuers was his 17-year-old brother, who climbed a rope 80 feet down into the cave to get to the man who “was covered in mud and lying on a rock.” The brother with a doctor and other rescuers worked for several hours to tie the man to a stretcher and inch him 80 feet back up through the narrow cave opening, which was described as close in size to a three-foot long coffee table.

The man, a co-op student at Southern Tech, was listed in good condition at Tri-County Hospital in Oglethorpe after being rescued from his 16 hour ordeal.

♦♦♦

The first of eight C-124 Globemasters for the 445th Troop Carrier Wing was reported in the Thursday, July 1, 1965 paper as having touched down at the Dobbins Air Force Base runway the day before. Arrival of the “mammoth four-engine transport began the wing’s transition from the C-123 Providers.”

Col. Carl. F. Rudder, director of operations for the 445th, explained the C-124 would change the wing from “an airborne unit to a global operation to support MATS (the Military Air Transport Service).”

The 230-mph transport could carry 40,000 pounds of cargo 1,800 miles. It had clam-shell nose doors, which opened so a built-in loading ramp could be used. Almost every motorized vehicle used by the military at the time was able to be driven up the ramp into the aircraft and flown away fully assembled.

An elevator in the middle of the fuselage of the plane could also be used to speed the loading or unloading of cargo. The C-124 also could carry 200 battle-equipped infantrymen or, with litters installed, 127 patients and their medical attendants could be flown from the battlefield.

♦♦♦

The number of bids submitted by Georgia interests for “one of the most sought-after plums ever offered by the federal government,” a $230 million “world’s biggest atom smasher,” was reported in the Friday, July 2, 1965 paper as having increased to nine. The proposed sites were mostly concentrated in the Atlanta area, but two were located in southern Georgia in the cities of Savannah and Bainbridge.

The location closest to Cobb County was in Cartersville and entered by the Atlanta-Georgia Science and Technology Commission.

The nine sites were among 100 others from 43 states in the competition for the “sprawling, three-mile-in-circumference facility,” which was more than twice the size and capable of twice power of the largest facility that was being planned at the time by the Soviet Union.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, June 27, 1995 paper, it was reported that Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems emerged virtually unscathed from the corporate cost-cutting ax as its Bethesda, Maryland-based parent company announced plans to trim 7 percent off its 170,000-member work force by 1999.

As anticipated, Lockheed Martin Corp.’s Cobb County plant was to see minimal job cuts in the merger-related consolidation effort. The 340-employee purchasing department, which bought airplane parts and office supplies, was to be phased out. The department, which was located in what is now the LGE Community Credit Union building on Fairground Street, was to be meshed into a single department at Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems in Fort Worth, Texas.

♦♦♦

A powerful thunderstorm was reported in the Saturday, July 1, 1995 paper as having raked Cobb County the evening before and spawned a tornado that heavily damaged the Dairy Queen at 2598 South Cobb Drive in Smyrna, but only caused minor injuries.

Restaurant owner Doug Stoner, who would later become a state senator, was quoted as saying that he yelled for everyone to hit the floor after high winds blew the doors open. Moments later, the building was hit and the southwest side of the restaurant’s dining room collapsed as the windows were blown out from the force of the twister.

There were 15 customers and 10 employees in the restaurant, which was to mark its 40th anniversary later in the year and undergoing a partial renovation, at the time of the storm.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of June 25
by Damon_Poirier
June 26, 2015 03:40 PM | 451 views | 0 0 comments | 28 28 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a Leo Frank, rapid transit, melons, Whitlock Avenue, the Tritt family and Lockheed.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, June 25, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story that reported that Leo Frank’s death sentence for the now infamous murder of Mary Phagan of Marietta was commuted to life imprisonment by Gov. John M. Slaton. Frank was taken to Milledgeville “to serve his sentence on the State farm.”

A second story in that edition involving the Frank case reported that on July 2, the public could attend the unveiling of a monument to the memory of Phagan at her grave in the Marietta City Cemetery. The monument was a simple slab of gray marble on a triple base with an inscription that read: “Mary Phagan, Erected by Marietta Camp, Number 763, U.C.V.”

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, June 20, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that Cobb Commission Chairman Ernest Barrett was quoted as saying “I guess we took one heck of a big step backwards” while looking back on the previous Wednesday’s defeat of the Rapid Transit Referendum by the county’s voters. But, Barrett, Sen. Kyle Yancey and Rep. Hugh McDaniell all predicted that the county eventually would become a member of the proposed Metropolitan Atlanta Transit System.

“It is going to cost us more when we do get in it,” Barrett said, but indicated he had no doubt that citizens would soon realize they made a mistake.

Sen. Yancey was quoted as saying that he did not think there is anything to do now, but wait while the people come around to the fact that they were wrong. He also said, “I believe it would have been wise to have been in on the planning stages.”

♦♦♦

Melons were reported in the Wednesday, June 23, 1965 paper as having a bad day on the county’s highways.

Early that morning, a truck carrying a load of watermelons and cantaloupes were lost when the truck had a blow out and overturned at the intersection of the Four Lane, now known as U.S. Highway 41, and Interstate 285. There were no injuries in the accident, but the overturned truck blocked both northbound lanes of the highway and backed up traffic for five miles.

Then, shortly after noon, 764 watermelons were strewn out of a tractor-trailer truck over the Four Lane at Franklin Road in a five-car collision.

♦♦♦

Lloyd Cox, the former principal of Marietta High School, was reported in the Friday, June 25, 1965 paper as having been appointed superintendent of the city school system by the Marietta Board of Education. Cox was filling the vacancy created when Henry Kemp resigned to take a job with the State Board of Education.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, June 20, 1995 paper, State Department of Transportation Commissioner Wayne Shackelford endorsed a new road linking Dallas Highway with Reynolds Street at the South Loop as the solution to the daily Whitlock Avenue bottleneck.

“This is by far the most acceptable solution from a traffic standpoint,” Shackelford was quoted as saying during a tour of road projects in Cobb County organized by state Sen. Steve Thompson, D-Powder Springs, who chaired the Senate Transportation Committee. “It gives the traffic a straight shot and eliminates all the turning movements (at Powder Springs Road).”

More than 30,000 cars were traveling each day into and out of Marietta along Dallas Highway, many using the North and South Loops to get to Interstate 75 and east Cobb. The state was widening Dallas Highway to four lanes with a raised median from the Paulding County line to John Ward Road west of Marietta. But, the road narrowed into two lanes as it changed into Whitlock Avenue approaching the Marietta Square.

♦♦♦

East Cobb’s oldest historic home was reported in the Wednesday, June 21, 1995 paper as expected to be preserved and restored under development plans approved by the Cobb commissioners at a regular zoning hearing. Marietta-based developer B. Wilmont Williams said that he planned to restore the Tritt Homestead, built between 1845 and 1860, as part of a 41.5-acre subdivision on the south side of Post Oak Tritt Road and west of Johnson Ferry Road.

As recommended by county staff, Williams said he would apply to place the home, known for its pre-Civil War Greek Revival details, on local and national historical registers.

Titleholders on the property were James E. Tritt, Larry M. Tritt, Melissa Tritt Mathison and Wylene S. Tritt, descendants of the longtime east Cobb family. Other descendants of the family included popular country singer Travis Tritt, whose grandfather was memorialized by the road that bears his name, as well as Tritt Elementary.

Williams said the restored 1,200-square foot house would serve as the 82-home subdivision’s centerpiece and clubhouse surrounded by tennis courts and a swimming pool.

♦♦♦

A Russian aircraft design team and Bethesda, Maryland-based Lockheed Martin Co. were reported in the Thursday, June 22, 1995 paper as having teamed up to design a multi-purpose, 21st century fighter plane that could take off vertically or in normal fashion. The Moscow-based Yakovlev Design Bureau joined Lockheed Martin in the project to build the advanced attack aircraft for the U.S. military, although the Russian government still needed to approve the transfer of technology.

The total cost of the project was expected to reach $68.8 million, according to a spokesman for Lockheed Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems in Fort Worth, Texas where the bulk of the work would be done. Cobb-based Lockheed Martin Aeronautical Systems would provide engineering on the project.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of June 18
by Damon_Poirier
June 19, 2015 04:00 PM | 497 views | 0 0 comments | 34 34 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a rapid transit vote, Lyndon B. Johnson, a ham, Newt Gingrich and school uniforms.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, June 18, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story that reported Mrs. John C. Cogburn as the first prize winner in the Journal’s subscription campaign that was mentioned in my April 23 column. Cogburn won a five-passenger, fully-equipped Ford automobile with electric lights.

Ms. Artie White, who won the first prize 3½ years earlier, won the second place prize in the contest and Ms. Docia Babb won the third place prize. The second and third place prizes were diamond rings.

50 years ago …

A moderate turnout was reported in the Tuesday, June 15, 1965 paper as being expected in the following day’s special General Election where voters would decide the fate of rapid transit, something that is currently being discussed by the Cobb County Commission, and if Democrat Bill Teague or Republican Ben C. Jordan would take the countywide state representative post.

Experts said despite the rain forecast that the “drawing card” would be the rapid transit referendum. A straw poll conducted in Marietta and Smyrna showed that six people out of eight reported they would be in favor of Cobb County’s participation in a rapid transit system.

♦♦♦

A second story in the Tuesday, June 15, 1965 paper reported that a $273,000 water expenditure was overlooked and left out of a budget submitted a week earlier to the Marietta Board of Lights and Water.

City Manager Walter Brown was quoted as saying, “We kept wondering why we had so much extra money to work with while we were preparing (the budget).”

♦♦♦

A proposal to force the elimination of the Marietta City and Cobb County school systems and the creation of a new system in each of the county’s two senate districts was reported in the Wednesday, June 16, 1965 paper as being scheduled to be presented to the State Board of Education.

The recommendation, included in a 120-page report prepared by the Division of Surveys and Field Services of Peabody College for Teachers in Nashville, Tennessee, was that the school systems throughout the state should be created along senate district lines. The report, a result of a year-long study made at the request of the board, suggested that each school system could have between 15,000 and 20,000 students with a minimum of 10,000. At the time, the Marietta City Schools system had 5,660 students and the Cobb County system had 31,335.

A second story on the front, next to the above item, reported that Marietta School Superintendent Henry Kemp had resigned and accepted a post with the State Board of Education. He was replacing Cobb resident Paul Sprayberry, who was retiring as area representative of the Seventh District. The position acted as a liaison between the schools in the district and the State Department of Education.

♦♦♦

It was also reported in that paper that President Lyndon B. Johnson had canceled his plans at the last minute to land at Dobbins Air Force Base on his way to the funeral of his long-time friend Judge Robert Russell Jr. of the Georgia Court of Appeals. Judge Russell was the nephew of Sen. Richard B. Russell.

Air Force officials were preparing for the President’s arrival when word came from the White House that Johnson would instead fly to Athens and then helicopter to Winder for the funeral at the First Baptist Church of Winder. The 5,000-foot Athens airport forced the President to use the Lockheed JetStar because the field was not capable of handling a plane the size of Air Force One.

♦♦♦

In the Thursday, June 17, 1965 paper, a ham floating in a sack on a lake off Hurt Road was reported as startling passersby and generating a few anxious moments for the Cobb County Sheriff’s office.

Apparently, some citizens saw the sack bobbing in the water and pulled it to shore. Fearing they had found a dead baby and afraid to look inside, the citizens called the Sheriff’s office. Detectives rushed to the scene of the “crime” and discovered that the “baby” was only a ham.

20 years ago …

Sharing a stage in the first presidential primary state, President Bill Clinton and House Speaker Newt Gingrich of east Cobb were reported in the Monday, June 12, 1995 paper as politely debating healthcare, foreign policy, budget priorities and promising to launch a bipartisan search for lobbying and political reforms. Far from the rancorous discord of Washington, the Democratic president and Republican speaker held court outdoors for an hour with an audience of elderly voters, using their five questions as a springboard for a calm but candid outline of their myriad differences.

♦♦♦

Seven McEachern High School students were reported in the Thursday, June 15, 1995 paper as modeling before the Cobb County Board of Education navy blue blazers, nicely pressed khaki shorts, pleated skirts and pullover sweaters as part of their proposed optional school uniforms for the 1996 school year. Ralph Williams, the principal at McEachern, and the student models illustrated the school’s plan for the uniforms which would be left up to students and their parents to participate in.

The plan, however, enraged board member Norman Bigham, who was quoted as saying, “We’re not running a private academy in this system, and if that’s what you have in mind, you’re sadly mistaken.” He also argued that some students might not be able to afford the clothes and might feel left out.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of June 11
by Damon_Poirier
June 12, 2015 02:25 PM | 574 views | 0 0 comments | 40 40 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Leo Frank, integration, Gov. George Wallace, Russian art and a Marietta strip club.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, June 11, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier the entire front page was taken up with an ad for The Haverty Furniture Co.’s “Quitting Business Sale.” The company announced that it was permanently closing the Marietta store, which was located at 108 Washington Avenue in Marietta opposite the courthouse.

♦♦♦

A second story in that edition announced that the Board of Pardons submitted a report to Gov. John M. Slaton “declining to recommend that the sentence of Leo Frank be commuted to life imprisonment.” The report was signed by E.L. Rainey and R.E. Davison. Judge T.E. Patterson submitted a minority report of more length dissenting from the majority report.

The article also stated that “no hope for Frank remains unless the Governor sees fit to commute his sentence.”

Frank, the superintendent of the National Pencil Company factory in Atlanta, was sentenced to death and later lynched by citizens of Marietta in the now infamous murder of May Phagan.

♦♦♦

A third story gave an update on the damage claims against federal troops during the Civil War to property owned by Georgians in the Seventh Congressional District, which was first mentioned in my March 19 column.

The $3,000 claim by the Presbyterian Church of Marietta was expected to be paid in four weeks, according Col. Fred Morris who had “vigorously prosecuted the collection of this claim for the past several years.”

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, June 6, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal, it was reported that approximately 40 black students applied for transfer to white schools prior to the May 31 deadline set in the Cobb County Board of Education’s integration plan. Cobb County Schools Superintendent Jasper Griffin said most of the applications were from high school and junior high school students. Griffin said none of the applications had yet been processed, but “we will process them as quickly as we can.”

The desegregation plan presented to the Department of Health, Education and Welfare by the Marietta School System had not yet been accepted, but Superintendent Henry Kemp said his office had already received some 25-30 applications from black students who wanted to transfer.

♦♦♦

As mentioned in last week’s column, Marietta Daily Journal Editor Jim Wynn was among 50 other editors from across the nation who embarked on a four-day tour of Alabama as guests of Gov. George Wallace.

In the Monday, June 7, 1965 paper, the first of Wynn’s columns appeared, describing the tour and “The True Alabama Story.” Wynn described Gov. Wallace as “the fiery little Alabama chief executive” and that he “set the stage for the tour Sunday night by bluntly accusing newsmen from outside the state and the wire services of news distortion.”

As an example of news distortion, Gov. Wallace cited a story carried in the national press in which a Nun was quoted as saying a black man had been turned away from an Alabama hospital because of his race. Gov. Wallace stated that the Nun in question did not make the statement and had come out publicly saying so. He also cited that the press referred to him as “Segregationist Gov. George Wallace” as a “form of distortion.”

Wynn’s other columns, which ran on the front page every day until Friday, June 11, 1965, covered topics like Selma, Alabama possibly teetering towards a new racial crisis, how Alabama’s industries were booming and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

♦♦♦

A second story in the Monday, June 7, 1965 paper reported that the Marietta Board of Lights and Water approved a $15,000 grant to the city of Marietta for a study to be made on the feasibility of converting Dobbins Air Force Base into a general aviation airport. This would have meant joint use of the airport by military and civilian aircraft.

♦♦♦

A group of Marietta teenagers were reported in the Wednesday, June 9, 1965 paper as having buried themselves in a fallout shelter on Lott Avenue in an effort to set a record for a No-Sleep Marathon.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, June 6, 1995 paper, it was reported that attendance was gradually increasing at the Cobb Galleria Centre’s “Sacred Art of Russia” exhibition, but the numbers were still far short of organizer’s expectations, especially when compared with similar exhibits showing in the Southeast.

As of Sunday, June 4, 1995, only 22,300 people had toured the exhibition since it opened on Saturday, May 13, 1995 and was averaging only 1,000 visitors a day, well under the 5,000 a day required to meet the overall attendance goal of 400,000. Local business leaders had hoped to recoup from box office receipts the $5 million they raised to launch the show.

♦♦♦

A second story in that edition reported that Cobb County was the first-runner up to host the final stage of the Tour De Pont, an international cycling race that could pump about $2 million into the local economy just prior to the 1996 Olympic Games. Race organizers said three Southeastern cities – Richmond, Virginia; Greenville, South Carolina; and Charlotte, North Carolina – were vying with Cobb to stage the final leg of the 12-day race.

♦♦♦

With city officials threatening to shut them down, the owners of a Marietta strip club was reported in the Wednesday, June 7, 1995 paper as having “filed suit seeking enough money to build the world-famous landmark for which it is named – the Taj Mahal.”

The suit, filed in Cobb Superior Court, sought punitive and compensatory damages in excess of $235 million, plus at least $250,000 in lawyer’s fees, if the city enforced a law it adopted on Thursday, Jan. 19, 1995 prohibiting the sale of alcohol at any club featuring nude dancing. The suit asked a judge to permanently enjoin the city from enforcing the new law, which took effect Sunday, Dec. 31, 1995 and applied to clubs like the Taj Mahal and nearby Boomers, both on Cobb Parkway near Windy Hill Road.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

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The Week of June 4
by Damon_Poirier
June 05, 2015 11:25 AM | 664 views | 0 0 comments | 44 44 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Leo Frank, “New Austell,” Gov. George Wallace, a fire, Bob Barr and Newt Gingrich.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, June 4, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story that reported a mass meeting was held at the Marietta Courthouse the Monday before. At the meeting, several Marietta citizens appointed a delegation to go before the Board of Pardons and protest against the interference of outside parties in the case of Leo Frank.

A resolution was adopted and presented to the Board by the committee. The resolution asked that “in the interest of justice and fairness” the citizens of Marietta “respectfully ask that the Prison Commission and the Governor of the State of Georgia” to pass on the application of Leo M. Frank and “let the verdict of the jury” of the Superior Court of Fulton County stand in the murder of Mary Phagan.

50 years ago …

The Austell City Council was reported in the Sunday, May 30, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal as having voted unanimously to take a neutral position in the question of incorporating a large portion of South Cobb, including Mableton. The group added it would help in any way possible compiling and disseminating information concerning the establishment of the new city.

Mayor Luke Garrett said he felt “this is our job, because we are the only incorporated city in the proposed area which includes all of the Austell, Howells, Coxes and part of the Lemons Militia Districts. We are the only ones who know what to expect.” He also reiterated what he said a week earlier that annexing the 45-square-mile area into the Austell city limits would be left up to the voters.

Later in the week, on Friday, June 4, 1965, it was reported that proponents of the move had charged the opponents with whitewashing the issues and asserting that much was to be gained by “uniting in a common cause to establish a healthy political and social climate in the South Cobb area.”

A meeting was scheduled for the following week at South Cobb High School’s auditorium to discuss in detail the proposal for the incorporation of “New Austell.” Elmer George, executive director of the Georgia Municipal Association, was to be the featured speaker and Quinton Farmer would discuss the proposal.

♦♦♦

Stephen Roach was reported in the Tuesday, June 1, 1965 paper as having discovered Civil War relics in his father’s front yard on Turner Road in Marietta after the headlights on his car illuminated something in the dirt as he was backing out of the driveway one night.

Roach’s discovery was the remains of clothing from a Union soldier that included seven tarnished brass buttons, a breastplate and a belt buckle. Near the Union relics, he also found a squashed minnie ball, the barrel of a Confederate rifle and a Confederate belt buckle.

♦♦♦

In the Thursday, June 3, 1965 paper, Marietta Daily Journal Editor Jim Wynn was reported as being among 50 other editors from across the nation that would embark on a four-day tour of Alabama the following week as guests of Gov. George Wallace.

Wallace, who would lead the tour, said “It will be an ‘observation trip.’ The newsmen will be taken on a planned tour the first three days and may choose where they wish to visit the fourth day. The State of Alabama will provide airplane and bus transportation for the newsmen.”

Wallace had been a strong critic of news coverage of racial strife in Alabama and said the tour was designed to give the editors a firsthand look at what Alabama was really like.

♦♦♦

Also in that day’s paper it was reported that Cmdr. George I. Marshall was the new executive officer of the Naval Air Station in Marietta. He was relieving Capt. Kenneth G. Miles, who had assumed command of Oklahoma City’s Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Training Center.

20 years ago …

Arson was reported in the Tuesday, May 30, 1995 paper as being suspected in a fire that ripped through a textile equipment manufacturing plant in north Cobb the day before.

Cobb fire officials estimated the damage to Practix Manufacturing Company’s 38,000-square foot plant on Cantrell Road east of Acworth at more than $1 million. The plant’s owner blamed the fire on a disgruntled former employee who he had fired three months earlier and evicted from a wooden-frame house on the property in front of the plant.

Later in the week, on Friday, June 2, 1995, a Bartow County husband and wife were charged with setting fire to the plant. Along with the first degree arson charges, the couple was also charged with several counts of burglary that took place on the morning of the fire in the house next to the burned-out structure.

♦♦♦

A second story in the Friday, June 2, 1995 paper reported that U.S. Rep. Bob Barr, R-Smyrna, had appointed a nine-member advisory team with saving Medicare from becoming insolvent without cutting service.

Federal estimates showed the $178-billion Medicare system would go bankrupt by 2002 if the then-current 10-plus percent yearly growth rate wasn’t trimmed dramatically. The Smyrna Republican said the solution was more complicated than just pumping money into the system, slicing benefits or limiting eligibility.

♦♦♦

Sounding more like a presidential candidate than the House leader, Speaker Newt Gingrich, R-east Cobb, was reported in the Saturday, June 3, 1995 paper as differing sharply with President Bill Clinton over sending U.S. troops into Bosnia.

During a breakfast meeting at the Cobb Galleria Centre with about 350 local business leaders, Gingrich said U.S. troops should not into Bosnia without a clearly defined mission or be placed under United Nations command.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of May 28
by Damon_Poirier
May 29, 2015 03:45 PM | 701 views | 0 0 comments | 48 48 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at the Dixie Highway, Interstate North, Mableton, polio and Jesse Jackson.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, May 28, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story that reported that the Dixie Highway, which is now known as Old U.S. Highway 41, would come through Cobb County. The commissioners selecting the route decided that “the excellent graded road from the Bartow line through Cobb was the only way.” The route, which connected Chicago to southern Florida, was expected to pass through Smyrna on its way to Atlanta.

♦♦♦

It was also reported that on the previous Saturday, Norton Hardware Company sold 120 brooms in two hours. The brooms, normally 25-cents each, were being sold for 10-cents.

♦♦♦

A third story in that edition reported the residents of Atlanta Street “treated the men working on that road to a barbecue dinner in the park.” The meal was served by the Marietta Restaurant with lemonade donated by W.A. Sams and a box of Marietta-made cigars was furnished by J.B. Cox.

♦♦♦

George Brown of the Mayes & Brown livery stable was reported in that edition as being severely injured after being thrown from a mule. Brown was riding down Cherokee Street when a dog ran out and bit the mule, which threw Brown against a post that fractured his back and broke several ribs.

50 years ago …

Cobb Commission Chairman Ernest Barrett was reported in the Sunday, May 23, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal as becoming a father. Barrett’s daughter was born seven and one-half pounds at 4:30 a.m. the day before at Piedmont Hospital in Atlanta.

♦♦♦

Also that day it was reported that a 100-acre office, research and development park – the first of its kind in the state of Georgia – opened at the intersection of I-75 and the Atlanta Perimeter Road, now known as I-285, in Cobb County.

Dubbed Interstate North, the park was officially dedicated by the Adams-Cates Realty Co. of Atlanta and the Cobb County Chamber of Commerce and governmental officials. The park, designed to attract research and development firms to the Cobb and Atlanta area, contained 32 lots ranging in size from 1.8 to four acres.

♦♦♦

The possibility of annexing Mableton into Austell was reported in the Monday, May 24, 1965 paper.

Austell City officials, the Cobb County Commissioners and Cobb’s legislative delegation were expected to review the question at a called meeting in the Austell City Hall. The discussion was to center around “a possible referendum and interested parties will request the introduction of a constitutional amendment in the legislature” in 1966.

♦♦♦

A second story in that paper announced the death and funeral services for Claud T. Perkerson, the former co-owner of the Perkerson Grist Mill in Austell and a former member of the Cobb County Advisory Committee. Perkerson, 79, had died following a short illness.

The grist mill was one of the oldest in the county. It had been operated by the Perkerson family since the Civil War, but was sold in 1962 which ended the 111 years of one family ownership. It was also reported to be the first mill to make self-rising corn meal.

Perkerson was an elder in the Austell Presbyterian Church, the former president of the Austell Rotary Club, the former president of the Georgia Corn Millers Association and a past master of Latham Lodge No. 12 of the Free and Accepted Masons.

♦♦♦

The U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare was reported in the Tuesday, May 25, 1965 paper as having approved a $993,911 grant for development of campus facilities at the proposed Kennesaw Mountain Junior College, now known as Kennesaw State University.

The following day, May 26, 1965, it was reported that work was scheduled to begin immediately on the grading at the college site as the Cobb Commissioners authorized the execution of the contract submitted by C.W. Mathews Co. of Marietta.

Mathews was the low bidder with an offer of $198,988. Other bids, seven in all, ranged upward of $290,000.

♦♦♦

While Cobb County had not had a case of polio in five years, Dr. Ernest Thompson - the head of the county health department, urged parents in the Wednesday, May 26, 1965 paper to get their children inoculated against the disease. Free Sabin oral vaccines for children ages nine months to 10 years of age were being offered by the county.

In Operation Sugar Lump, which took place over a year before, Cobb volunteers distributed 276,354 lumps of vaccine-treated sugar. Since that time, the program was reported as having lagged.

♦♦♦

In the Friday, May 28, 1965 paper it was reported that a masked intruder operating in Atlanta had frightened Cobb housewives into buying guns, rescue sprays and tear gas pens.

A check of local stores revealed that the sale of guns to women had almost doubled in the past month. One chain of stores had sold more than 10 tubes of “rescue spray” in the past three days.

Most of the women were being brought to the stores by their husbands who insisted they needed a gun for protection and most of the purchases were .25-caliber automatics.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, May 23, 1995 paper, Jesse Jackson, who was on a three-day march in Cobb County, urged students to hold themselves to a higher standard and to stand up to friends involved in drugs or violence.

Addressing an assembly of about 1,500 students at Campbell High School in Smyrna, Jackson asked the students to stand if they knew anyone involved in drugs or bringing them to school. It was reported that nearly all of the students stood up. But, when Jackson asked them to stand again if they had ever told authorities what they knew, fewer than 10 students stood up.

After the speech Jackson headed to the east Cobb office of House Speaker Newt Gingrich to deliver a letter protesting the Republican Contract with America, which would hold down funding increases for social programs.

It was also reported that while Jackson was in Georgia, a bomb threat forced the evacuation of the offices of his Rainbow Coalition in Washington, D.C. However, no bomb was found.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of May 14
by Damon_Poirier
May 15, 2015 04:45 PM | 818 views | 0 0 comments | 60 60 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at the Lusitania, Leo Frank, Lockheed, Delk Road, KSU, Newt Gingrich and Jesse Jackson.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, May 14, 1915 edition of The Marietta Journal and Courier there was a story that reported “one of the greatest horrors of the great European War occurred last Friday when a German submarine boat torpedoed the great English trans-Atlantic Liner Lusitania.”

The RMS Lusitania was a British ocean liner that briefly was the world's largest passenger ship. On May 7, 1915, she was torpedoed and sunk by a German U-boat, during World War I, causing the deaths of 1,198 passengers and crew. The ship was reported in the paper as having taken 15 minutes to sink with “Alfred J. Vanderbilt, Charles Frohman, Elbert Hubbard and many other well-known Americans” on board.

♦♦♦

It was also reported that following the refusal of the U.S. Supreme Court to intervene in the case of Leo Frank, who was sentenced to death in the widely publicized and controversial murder trial of 13-year-old Mary Phagan of Marietta, that Frank’s death sentence remained in effect. This time, the date was set for June 22, 1915. An appeal “to the pardon board and the governor” was expected to be made by Frank’s attorneys.

♦♦♦

A third story in that edition reported that an escaped convict from the county jail was arrested in Jacksonville, Illinois. At the time of the man’s arrest he was cashing a forged money order for $400 from the National Express Company. It was believed at the time that the convict would be prosecuted for that offense and not brought back to Georgia.

50 years ago …

In the Monday, May 10, 1965 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that Lockheed had outlined plans for giving aircraft “instant physicals” while in flight which would “save thousands of hours of down time and increase airlift productivity for a flight of super transports.”

The Lockheed-Georgia Company said it had developed “a malfunction detection system, somewhat like a cardiograph, which will constantly take the pulse of an aircraft.” The system, a major extension of Lockheed’s Malfunction and Detection Recorder (MADREC) would be used on the Air Force’s C-5A cargo carrier.

♦♦♦

A “three-in-one” JetStar, capable of being converted in minutes from a passenger transport to an ambulance or a cargo carrier was reported in the Tuesday, May 11, 1965 paper as being unveiled at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois by Lockheed-Georgia Company Vice President R.I. Mitchell. The “station wagon” concept of the four-jet engine, 500 miles per hour swept-wing transport made its debut during the Command Surgeon’s Air Evacuation Symposium at the Military Air Transport Service (MATS) Headquarters Base.

A full-scale cabin demonstration showed the military medics how a typical tier of six litters and six ambulatory patients could be accommodated in a standard C-140 JetStar. The “station wagon” configuration increased the payload, transporting 17 passengers or 3,500 pounds of cargo.

♦♦♦

County Commissioner Thomas H. Brown was reported in the Wednesday, May 1965 paper as having sent a letter to State Attorney General Eugene Cook asking him to “investigate” and give “advice” on the Delk Road Connector controversy in Cobb County. In the letter, a copy of which was sent to James L. Gillis, director of the State Highway Department, County Commission Chairman Ernest Barrett and Cobb Solicitor General Luther C. Hames Jr., Brown said there had been a great number of rumors concerning the Delk Road Connector “especially as to the use of influence to change the Delk Road Interchange from a limited access to a free access interchange.”

The week before, the State Highway Department reported appraisals were being made on the road as both a limited access and free access. The proposed connector was to be a link between the Four-Lane Highway, now known as U.S. Highway 41, and Interstate 75. Property on the north and south sides of the proposed connector had been sold in recent months for more than $700,000.

♦♦♦

Dr. Horace W. Sturgis, associate registrar at Georgia Tech since 1948, was reported in the Friday, May 14, 1965 paper as having been named the president of Kennesaw Mountain Junior College, which is now known as Kennesaw State University. Dr. Sturgis was to start his official duties on July 1, 1965.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, May 8, 1995 paper it was reported that House Speaker Newt Gingrich suggested he was still giving some thought to running for president in 1996.

“I refuse to rule it out,” the East Cobb Republican said about seeking the nomination, adding that Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole was the clear GOP front-runner.

♦♦♦

The Rev. Jesse Jackson was reported in the Wednesday, May 10, 1995 paper as accusing Rep. Gingrich of helping foster a national atmosphere of hate and right-wing aggression. Rev. Jackson made his remarks during a short address on the Marietta Square and announced a Rainbow Coalition march would happen later in the month.

Taking scattershot aim at conservative talk radio, militia groups and right-wing politicians, Rev. Jackson called the approach to welfare reform outlined by Rep. Gingrich’s “Contract with America” as “an attack on women, seniors and those most vulnerable.”

With police standing around Glover Park and police sharpshooters perched on the roof of the Cobb County Administration building across the street, Rev. Jackson appeared before a crowd of about 50 supporters. The former Democratic presidential candidate opened fire on Rep. Gingrich by saying the east Cobb congressman had encouraged hostility toward the poor and minorities that has gained national acceptance among some right-wing groups.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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