MDJ Time Capsule by Damon_Poirier
This week’s Time Capsule looks at a drunken pony, a sniper and the first black students at Marietta High School.
July 12, 2014 04:00 AM | 57618 views | 0 0 comments | 2157 2157 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

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The Week of July 10
by Damon_Poirier
July 12, 2014 04:00 AM | 18 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a drunken pony, a sniper and the first black students at Marietta High School.

100 years ago …

In Friday, July 10, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about a man who was severely shocked when lightning struck his house, tore out a window within six inches of his head as he was lying in bed. The electricity struck his left shoulder and ran down his leg, leaving a badly burned place three inches wide.

A second story that week reported that Lucius Dubignon Clay, who would later become famous as the general in charge of occupied Germany after World War II, was reported as receiving his appointment to West Point from Sen. West who had fulfilled the promise made to Clay’s mother by the late Sen. Bacon.

50 years ago …

Juvenile Court Judge Conley Ingram was reported in the Sunday, July 5, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as saying that the abandoned baby found in Marietta mentioned in last week’s column was to be put up for adoption in a month if the child’s parents were not located. The infant, named Henry Conley Joiner by the supervisor of the Juvenile Home, was found on the front seat of Richard S. Joiner’s car in June. At first the child was thought to be a baby kidnapped from a Chicago hospital two days after birth, but detectives determined that was not the case.

Acworth city officials were reported in the Monday, July 6, 1964 paper as saying that they knew who had placed a drunken pony in the city jail and were looking for enough evidence to bring the case before a Cobb County Grand Jury. A special police committee of Acworth city councilmen had been urged to “accelerate investigation” of the pony incident and a series of other pranks played recently on Acworth law enforcement officers. Acworth Mayor Mary McCall had also called in the GBI and the Cobb Sheriff’s Office to help obtain evidence against the pranksters.

A second story that day reported that bloodhounds were requested from Cobb Police to help track down a prisoner who escaped from a work detail at Red Top Mountain State Park in Bartow County. The escapee had been imprisoned at the Ellijay prison camp and was believed to be hiding out on the mountain.

In the Tuesday, July 7, 1964 paper it was reported that a group of citizens threatened the Smyrna City Council with legal action if the council denied any responsibility for a drainage problem on San Fernando Drive. The citizens, represented by an attorney, said that water was washing down from a street above them and bringing “beer cans” and other garbage into their yards. The water flow, the attorney said, was caused by the city’s installation of a drainage pipe into a natural drainage ditch, which changed the direction and flow into the backyards of his clients.

An unknown sniper was reported in the Wednesday, July 8, 1964 paper as having fired five shots at Marietta Patrolman Pat W. Paul as he sat in his car at the Reynolds and Wright streets intersection. Paul, who was not hit, was stopped near the intersection’s corner and was making out his daily reports when he heard the windshield crash. He said that he ducked into the seat as three more shots came through the window.

Cobb Democratic Party leaders were reported in the Thursday, July 9, 1964 paper as setting a qualifying period for candidates after voters overwhelmingly approved a change from a single to a multiple commissioner county government in a referendum held the day before. More than 10,000 voters turned out at the polls to pile up a 7,297 to 2,791 victory margin for the governmental change. The first multiple seat commission was to take office in January 1965.

In the Friday, July 10, 1964 paper it was reported that two black students filed applications for transfer to Marietta High School at the beginning of the September school term. Speaking for the Marietta Board of Education, City School Superintendent Henry Kemp confirmed that the applications had been received, but would not reveal the names.

20 years ago …

The storm that caused severe flooding south of Atlanta was reported in the Thursday, July 7, 1994 paper as having dropped more than three inches of rain on Cobb County over the course of four days and more was on the way.

In the following day’s paper, Friday, July 8, 1994, it was reported that the death toll in south Georgia had hit 18 and that divers were searching for bodies in murky floodwaters while rescuers were plucking stranded people out of trees. Bottled water was the most-needed relief item in the flood-stricken counties, according to the Salvation Army’s Cobb unit, which was sending its mobile unit into the area.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of July 3
by Damon_Poirier
July 05, 2014 04:00 AM | 40 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a flag, a baby, Viet Nam, Civil Rights, tornadoes and C-130s.

100 years ago …

In Friday, July 3, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about Gov. Joseph M. Brown of Marietta declaring his candidacy for the U.S. Senate against Sen. Hoke Smith. His published announcement was brief and his platform was expected to be released at a later date. The announcement also said that he planned to open his campaign headquarters by or shortly after July 15.

A second story that week reported that on June 14th a silk American flag measuring 6-feet by 10-feet was unfurled on top of a 115-foot pole, “the tallest flagstaff in Georgia and given to the Austell High School” by a young business man in the city. An electric light was placed on top of the pole so it could be seen from Marietta.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, June 28, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that the South repulsed the North in a furious battle on the slopes of the Kennesaw Mountain battlefield at the county farm as part of the week-long centennial celebration of the Civil War battle at the mountain. The mock battle involved some 2,000 reactivated troopers in uniform.

Also that day, Cobb Legislative Candidate Hugh Lee McDaniell revealed his plans to ask the General Assembly to approve a $100-million state-financed Urban Roads Program in a move to ease traffic woes in Cobb and other rapidly growing counties. McDaniell, who was seeking election to the House post being vacated by Rep. Joe Mack Wilson, said he would ask Gov. Carl Sanders to give administrative backing to the plan.

The name “Harry Conley Joiner” was given to the four-month old baby that was mentioned in last week’s column. The child was named by Herman Hughes, supervisor of the Cobb Juvenile Home, and his wife with permission given by Richard S. Joiner in whose car the abandoned baby was found. Investigators were still looking to find the child’s parents.

In the Tuesday, June 30, 1964 paper it was reported that a suit was filed to prevent Commissioner Herbert McCollum from continuing with plans for construction of the new judicial and public safety buildings. The suit was to be heard by Cobb Superior Court Judge Albert Henderson.

A grieving Marietta widow was reported in the Wednesday, July 1, 1964 paper as waiting at home for a last letter which was believed to be sent by her 25-year-old husband just before he was killed in combat in South Viet Nam. The soldier was killed when the U.S. turbo-jet helicopter he was piloting was shot down by Communist guerillas.

Another story in that paper reported that a 20-year-old Austell housewife was killed when the taxi in which she was a passenger crashed into the Sweetwater Creek bridge abutment on State Route 6. The woman was dead on arrival at Kennestone Hospital from severe head and chest injuries. She was the 17th fatality in the county for the year and the second in a week.

A high ranking Naval officer was reported in the Thursday, July 2, 1964 paper as having landed his jet plane at the wrong airfield. At 11:30 p.m., a T-33 Naval trainer plane carrying the two officers arrived from Patuxent River, Md., but instead of landing at Dobbins Air Force Base the plane pulled into privately operated McCollum Airport, which is no known as Cobb County Airport – McCollum Field, in Kennesaw. The speeding jet plane sailed off the end of the runway onto a graded area and was stopped just a few feet shy of a steep 50-foot embankment.

A second story that day reported five fire alarms came into the Marietta fire station all within a period of nine minutes. All of the alarms were false and two teenage brothers were apprehended. Capt. Bartow Adair, head of the fire prevention bureau, said the boys were caught after they wrecked and abandoned the family car on the railroad tracks on Dobbs Street.

Three young black men were reported as being served at a previously segregated lunch counter in Cobb County in the Friday, July 3, 1964 paper in a test of the public accommodation section of the new Civil Rights Act. The men were reported as integrating the lunch counter at a downtown Marietta store without incident and more tests were expected in the county. Other Cobb County restaurants and motel operators who refused to accommodate blacks in the past said they would comply with the new act which was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson the day before.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, June 28, 1994 MDJ it was reported that two storms, accompanied by tornado-force winds, slammed into east and west Cobb, damaging about 130 homes, shearing and uprooting hundreds of trees and leaving thousands without power. Although the damage was extensive, only one minor injury was reported for Cobb County. Across the state, however, two people were killed and dozens injured by the storms.

Another story that day reported up to 30 C-130s were in the pipeline for Cobb-based Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co., but the defense contractor said more planes were needed to prevent additional layoffs. The House Appropriations Committee, at the urging of U.S. Rep. George “Buddy” Darden (D-Marietta), added $330 million to its fiscal 1996 Defense Appropriations Act to buy 10 C-130 cargo planes. The House Armed Services Committee also budgeted for two C-130s and the Senate Armed Services Committee had added money for eight cargo planes.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of June 26
by Damon_Poirier
June 28, 2014 04:00 AM | 73 views | 0 0 comments | 1 1 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Marietta’s abandoned baby and the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain centennial events.

100 years ago …

In Friday, June 26, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about the then-upcoming unveiling of the marble and bronze Cheatham’s Hill Monument to the soldiers of the State of Illinois who fought at the site during the Civil War. The monument was to be unveiled almost 50 years to the day of the famous battle. Illinois Gov. Edward Duune and his staff along with “a party of veterans of the Federal army” were expected to be on hand.

A second story that week reported that J. Gid Morris of Belmont, near Marietta, sent the first cotton blooms of the year to the Journal’s office. The blooms were found on June 18 on his farm. Another farmer, C.J. Weaver, brought in a bloom to the paper that opened on June 21 near town while H.H. Carrie of Kennesaw brought in two cotton blooms from his farm less than a week ago.

50 years ago …

Colorfully-clad Union and Confederate troopers from across the country were reported in the Sunday, June 21, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as arriving in the county for the week-long “commemoration of the bloody Battle of Kennesaw Mountain.” At least 2,000 “reactivated” Civil War soldiers from more than 30 states were expected to participate in the event – billed as “one of the largest ever planned in the four-year, nationwide centennial.”

Also that day, it was reported that photographs taken of the four-month old abandoned baby mentioned in last week’s column were ruled unsuitable by the FBI and a request for more pictures were made. The pictures, which were to be used to identify if the child was a kidnapped child from Chicago, were made by a commercial photographer in Marietta and flown to Chicago by jet. Special emphasis was given to the baby’s ear lobes. Since no footprints were made of the child before it was stolen, the ear lobes “presented the best possibility for identification.”

The following day, Monday, June 22, 1964, it was reported that Marietta’s abandoned baby was not the missing Chicago baby. FBI Special Agent Marlin M. Johnson of the Chicago FBI office said medical experts studied the photos of the two babies and found seven physical differences including the shape of the ears.

A Civil War medic’s exhibit reported in the Tuesday, June 23, 1964 paper showed the medical uniforms, instruments and methods of 100 years ago as part of the events of the centennial celebration. The exhibition was held at the First Presbyterian Church in Marietta, located on the same site of its original building on Church Street which served as one of the five hospitals in the city during the Civil War.

Rep. Joe Mack Wilson, leader of a legislative move to prevent Atlanta from annexing property in Cobb County, was quoted in the Wednesday, June 24, 1964 paper as saying that he saw no immediate danger that the city would spread across the Chattahoochee River. Wilson told members of the Cobb Real Estate Board that his effort – blocked in the General Assembly by Fulton and DeKalb county legislators – was aimed at providing protection “15 to 20 years” down the road.

A band of dedicated Rebels from the unlikely Confederate states of Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Michigan were reported in the Thursday, June 25, 1964 paper as clattering into Marietta to join the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain Centennial celebration. Crowds gathered on the sidewalks as the colorful unit of mounted cavalrymen, horse drawn supply wagons and artillery pieces arrived after a four-day ride through north Georgia. The troops reportedly fired pistols and muskets while whooping and hollering on their march through town.

The commanding officer of a reactivated Confederate cavalry unit from Nashville, Tenn., was reported in the Friday, June 26, 1964 paper as becoming the first serious casualty of the Cobb County centennial when a replica Civil War cannon exploded. Lt. Gen. Richard Cornwell of the 1st Tennessee Cavalry suffered a broken cheek bone and the near loss of his eye as the artillery piece misfired. Witnesses said a fragment of the shattered barrel struck Cornwell in the face as he watched a demonstration of the firing of the old-fashioned gun at the centennial encampment on Clay Street. The cannon apparently overloaded with a blank charge of powder, was torn apart by the explosion.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, June 21, 1994 MDJ it was reported that after a three-day search of the Chattahoochee River, Cobb County police divers found the body of a Smyrna man who they believed was knocked off his bicycle into the water by a hit-and-run driver on a Cobb Parkway bridge.

State Sen. Johnny Isakson was quoted in the Friday, June 24, 1994 paper as saying that Cobb’s resolution critical of the gay lifestyle “was a mistake, and rescinding it would be the best thing we could possibly do.” But, the east Cobb Republican said he doubted that would occur and told a Marietta Kiwanis luncheon that he supported a compromise resolution offered by Cobb Commission Chairman Bill Byrne.

Another story that day, reported that Cobb County had tentatively agreed to shell out $100,000 to lawyers who won a 2½ year battle to stop Cobb from displaying a Ten Commandments plaque in the State Court building. Assistant county attorney Jerry Gentry and Gerald Weber, legal director for the American Civil Liberties Union, reached the agreement on June 17.

In the Saturday, June 25, 1994 paper it was reported that the day before a Wells Fargo truck skidded off the road on wet pavement to avoid a stopped vehicle making a left turn near the corner of Canton Highway and Shallowford Road. None of the money fell out in the crash. The driver and two guards stationed in back were taken to Kennestone Hospital in Marietta with minor injuries. Shortly after the accident, four other guards arrived and safely transported the money from the overturned vehicle to another Wells Fargo truck that quickly left the scene.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of June 19
by Damon_Poirier
June 21, 2014 04:00 AM | 100 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at the Lockheed StarLifter, train sideswipes, an abandoned baby and a gay pride rally.

100 years ago …

In Friday, June 19, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about an 18-year-old man who died from severe injuries after he dove into the Chattahoochee River and struck a rock or a tree stump.

A second story that week reported that “a great amount of damage was done to the crops in various parts of the county” during thunderstorms that happened the week before. Among the damage, one man in the northern part of the county had his barn blown down and outright killed one of his mules while two other mules were fatally injured. A second man had his barn blown down, a mule badly injured and his porch blown completely over the house, but not badly damaged. A third man had his cotton house blown down and his crop was almost ruined by hail, while a fourth man’s store was almost crushed when a big tree blew down and barely missed it.

50 years ago …

The first transcontinental hop of the U.S. Air Force C-141A – the Lockheed-Marietta made StarLifter – was reported in the Sunday, June 14, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal as being scheduled to depart from Dobbins Air Force Base. Maj. Joe Sciele and his USAF crew were to fly the fanjet giant to Edwards Air Force Base in California to begin accelerated service testing of the craft.

At the end of the week, in the Friday, June 19, 1964 paper, it was reported that President Lyndon Johnson had inspected the StarLifter during a visit to the 300,000-acre Air Force flight test center. The 158-ton fanjet transport, with an American flag painted on its four-story high T-tail, was flanked by three typical king-sized loads which it could airlift, nonstop at more than 500 miles per hour across either the Atlantic or the Pacific oceans. President Johnson was greeted on arrival by Brig. Gen. Irving L. Branch, commander of the test center in the Mojave Desert, Lockheed President Daniel J. Haughton and Vice President Clarence L. Johnson, and other high ranking military officials and aerospace executives. It was the first Presidential visit to Edwards Air Force Base since it was established 22 years earlier.

In the Monday, June 15, 1964 paper it was reported for the second time in a week two Louisville and Nashville freight trains were reported as having sideswiped at the “south switch” in Kennesaw just west of the Four-Lane Highway, now known as U.S. Hwy. 41. The two diesel-drawn L&N freights smacked together at the same location where a similar accident occurred four days earlier. The first sideswipe resulted in the death of an engineer, who was killed when the 100-ton diesel engine toppled over on him. In the second sideswipe, the southbound train, No. 831, struck the northbound train, Second No. 2, sending tank and box cars in every direction. Some cars were knocked 100 feet off the tracks. The south switch was a point where the main line ran off about a mile south of Kennesaw.

A 4-month-old baby boy wrapped in a white blanket was reported in the Tuesday, June 14, 1964 paper as having been found before dawn wiggling and crying in the front seat of a car parked on Freyer Drive. The child was found by a paperboy who heard the child’s cries and went to investigate.

Later that week, on Thursday, June 18, 1964, it was reported that a three-day old baby snatched from his mother’s arms in back in April in a Chicago hospital could possibly be the one found abandoned in Marietta. A woman disguised as a nurse snatched the boy from his mother as she was feeding him in a Chicago maternity hospital. Marietta Police and the FBI were reported as seeking more information on the case.

The following day, Friday, June 19, 1964, there was a story stating that police were waiting on the results of a blood test to determine if the abandoned infant was the kidnapped child in Chicago. Marietta Police said it was a one in a million chance the two babies were the same, but the possibility was being thoroughly checked out.

The Air Force announced in the Wednesday, June 17, 1964 paper that it had signed a “multi-year” contract with Lockheed-Georgia Company for approximately $500 million for purchase of 127 C-141 StarLifter aircraft. The planes, which Lockheed had been working on while negotiations were taking place, brought the total Air Force contract for StarLifters to 132. The contract, announced by the Aeronautical Systems Division Headquarters at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio, inaugurated a new concept of multi-year procurements designed to save money and improve control of the Air Force’s weapon systems procurement.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, June 13, 1994 MDJ it was reported that Pat Hussein, co-chair of the Atlanta gay-activist group – Olympics Out of Cobb, vowed to more than 130,000 gay rights supporters during intermittent rain in Atlanta’s Piedmont Park to make a national issue out of Cobb County’s resolution critical of the gay lifestyle. The effort was to be aimed at persuading officials of the Atlanta Committee for the Olympic Games to pull preliminary volleyball from the county-owned Cobb Galleria Centre. The rain did little to dampen the enthusiasm of the crowd whose members carried signs, one of which said - “Olympics in Cobb – The Worst Idea since New Coke.” The rally in Piedmont Park followed a march from the Atlanta Civic Center to close out Gay Pride Week, an annual celebration of gay rights.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of June 5
by Damon_Poirier
June 07, 2014 04:00 AM | 127 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a car accident, Lockheed, mysterious waters, a Ten Commandments plaque, the anti-gay resolution and Pat Robertson.

100 years ago …

In the Friday, June 5, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about a local man who was bed-ridden with his left arm crushed, his nose broken and covered in bruises and scratches after being thrown out of a racing car near Smyrna. The Atlanta man who was driving the car lost control after striking a deep rut and the tire exploded causing the vehicle to overturn. The driver was pinned beneath the car and was severely burned about his body and his forehead lacerated. A second passenger, from Atlanta, was also thrown from the car and suffered an injury to his right leg below the knee. All three were expected to recover.

A second story that week reported an ordinance to prohibit the operation of automobiles, motorcycles or other motor vehicles within the Marietta city limits unless the vehicle was equipped with a muffler. The ordinance also stated that there would be no repairs or work done on vehicles on the streets or other public places of the city.

The front page also reported the death of the Journal’s composing room foreman, William Alfred Walker, who died from acute pneumonia after being ill only a few days.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, May 31, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that a red, white and blue Lockheed-Georgia built Hercules soared off the Dobbins Air Force Base runway on a 4,930-mile nonstop flight to Turin, Italy. The plane, christened “One World,” was scheduled to touch down at Castle Airport in the northern Italy city that morning. It was the first leg of a 40,000-mile trip around the globe.

Another story that day reported the new Cobb County Judicial Building was going to have a fourth floor added to the plans. The decision to add the extra floor was agreed upon between Commissioner Herbert McCollum and Clerk of Court John LeCroy.

While most residents in the Terrell Mill Road area were suffering from the effects of a drought, one family was reported in the Monday, June 1, 1964 paper as having a mysterious and relentless source springing up everywhere on their property. The King family said that water began bubbling and oozing up from their landscaped front yard about two months earlier and had created a messy marsh. Water was constantly seeping into their basement and forcing them to pump it out every morning. Small streams were reported as running through the yard and forming a deep rising pond at one end.

It was also reported that day that Lockheed Aircraft Corporation placed in operation the fastest teletype relay system in the world, designed to save a quarter-million dollars a year in communications expense and to speed a 100-word telegram between California and Georgia in six seconds flat.

In the Tuesday, June 2, 1964 paper it was reported that a survey of industrial site potentials had been launched by the Cobb Chamber of Commerce. The project was to be conducted by Georgia Tech Research Institute to provide a general appraisal of the then-present industrial site situation in Cobb and follow up with detailed information on specific site areas.

A bill to renew the Elizabeth Community’s controversial 19th century city charter sailed through the State Senate and headed for the desk of Gov. Carl Sanders and executive approval. The Elizabeth Community was located where the present day Church Street Extension runs by Kennestone Hospital out to U.S. Highway 41.

20 years ago …

In the Wednesday, June 1, 1994 MDJ it was reported that Cobb officials lost their fight to display the Ten Commandments in the courthouse lobby and that the county could end up shelling out as much as $150,000 for the plaque. The U.S. Supreme Court’s refusal to hear the county’s appeal upheld earlier federal court rulings forcing the county to remove the plaque from the first-floor lobby of the Cobb State Court building just off the Marietta Square.

More than 80 local religious leaders were also reported as meeting that day behind closed doors to agree to a statement supporting the resolution that Cobb commissioners passed in 1993 that was critical of the gay lifestyle. The group also condemned the practice of homosexuality as a sin, but not “the sinner.”

Televangelist Pat Robertson was reported in the Saturday, June 4, 1994 paper as saying at a reception for Republican candidates at the Cobb Galleria Centre that he endorsed the county’s resolution which found the gay lifestyle incompatible with community standards. While he did not mention the controversial resolution during his brief remarks to a crowd of 700 at the gathering of the Christian Coalition of Georgia, when asked his position he stated that he supported it. Also, during his address to the Cobb-based Georgia arm of his national group, Robertson criticized the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision not to hear Cobb’s appeal of earlier federal rulings which ordered the county to remove a plaque bearing the Ten Commandments.

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of May 29
by Damon_Poirier
May 31, 2014 04:00 AM | 129 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a buggy accident, integration, a visit from Robert F. Kennedy and the C-17.

100 years ago …

In Friday, May 29, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about Mrs. J.T. Corley’s near death in a horse and buggy accident. Mrs. Corley was reported as driving a surrey – a popular American door-less, four-wheeled carriage of the late 19th and early 20th century – to Marietta on Powder Springs Road when the horse ran away and jumped over a bridge. Oscar Holtzclaw, who lived near the bridge, was the first to reach Mrs. Corley along with James T. Anderson, who was passing by in his car. The woman suffered a gash on her head, a broken left ankle, a sprained right ankle, a broken left wrist and an injured left hip.

A second story that week reported that a legal advertisement had been placed in the paper by Marietta business men seeking a charter for the Retail Creditman’s Association. The purpose of the Association was to collection information “on every party in Marietta and in Cobb County as far as possible as to their habits of meeting bills and whether or not they are prompt, medium or slow pay.” The information was to be kept in a secretary’s office furnished to the merchants and used by them as a basis of extending credit.

50 years ago …

Commissioner Herbert McCollum was quoted as saying reported in the Sunday, May 24, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal Cobb voters would be asked later in the year to approve a $5,636,000 road bond issue to begin soon after the new administration took over in January. McCollum disclosed his plan in a report to the Streets and Highways Committee of the Cobb Chamber of Commerce. He said that he would call candidates together as soon as the multiple commissioner issue was settled to seek agreement on the program.

In the Monday, May 25, 1964 paper it was reported that the U.S. Supreme Court sent back to Federal District Judge Frank Hooper in Atlanta for more hearings on black complaints that the Atlanta stair step school integration plan was too slow to be called “with deliberate speed.” Hooper had upheld the Atlanta grade-a-year plan several times as it had come under attack from black plaintiffs.

In a brief unsigned opinion read by Chief Justice Earl Warren, the Supreme Court held – “In light of the developments at and since the argument in the Atlanta school desegregation suit we deem it appropriate that the nature and effect of the board’s resolution of April 8, 1964 be appraised by the district court in a proper evidentiary hearing.” The resolution referred to by the high court was one adopted by the Atlanta School Board in what it reduced to only three points the procedure on which transfer of black students to white schools would be based.

Burglars were reported in the Tuesday, May 26, 1964 paper as having beat open a safe with a sledge hammer at the Rio Vista Restaurant and escaped with over $2,300 cash and a large amount of securities.

Another story that day reported that a 37-year-old Austell man, an escapee from the Milledgeville State Hospital, was being held in the county jail “awaiting the issue of a warrant charging him with rape of a 23-year-old woman patient at the hospital.”

In the Wednesday, May 27, 1964 paper that Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy on a stop in Cobb County laid a wreath at a magnolia tree dedicated to his brother, the late President John F. Kennedy, at Dobbins Air Force Base. Gen. George H. Wilson, commander of Dobbins, clipped the tree’s solitary bloom and gave it to Kennedy to take to President Kennedy’s wife, Jacqueline Kennedy. Robert Kennedy and his wife, Ethel, flew to Dobbins in a Lockheed-Georgia built JetStar. They then proceeded to Carrollton where Kennedy dedicated an inter-faith chapel to his brother at West Georgia College.

20 years ago …

Cobb’s resolution critical of gay lifestyles was reported in the Tuesday, May 24, 1994 MDJ as receiving overwhelming backing from county commissioners around the state in an anonymous survey, but few had acted to push the resolution in their own communities. A Kennesaw State College study conducted during January and February 1994, when protests by gay rights activists were at a lull, found a large percentage of Georgia’s commissioners said they personally agreed with the Cobb commission’s resolution. Another large percentage said that they would support a similar measure in their own county. But out of all of Georgia’s counties, only Wayne County in southeast Georgia had adopted a similar resolution.

In the Wednesday, May 25, 1994 paper it was reported that the C-17, an airlifter designated to replace the Cobb-based Lockheed Aeronautical Systems Co.’s C-141 and eventually the C-5, was kept alive in the House and got an unexpected boost from Rep. Newt Gingrich, R-east Cobb. In a crucial decision, the House voted to restore $1 billion in funding to the troubled McDonnell Douglas plant, boosting production from four to six aircraft in fiscal 1996. It was also a victory for the Clinton administration, which had initially proposed funding six C-17s. However, the House Armed Services Committee had slashed production to four and had designated the savings – about $1 billion – to be placed in a special “airlift fund,” created to buy off-the-shelf aircraft – such as Lockheed’s C-5B.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of May 22
by Damon_Poirier
May 24, 2014 04:00 AM | 151 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at a train accident, crap game raids, mosquitoes and Lockheed’s supersonic transport.

100 years ago …

In Friday, May 22, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about a 14-year-old girl who was struck and killed by a train coming out of Blue Ridge as she walked down the L&N Railroad tracks near Elizabeth. A second train on a parallel line coming from Chattanooga saw the danger the girl was in before the accident and blew his whistle to warn her. But, the whistle only diverted the attention of the girl and the engineer on the L&N train which resulted in the fatality.

Another front page story that week reported that “the largest transaction in the real estate market that has been recorded in a long time” happened when Gober Block was sold. The deal was made by J.E. Massey, president of the First National Bank, and R.E. Butler for a price of $27,500. The owners of the property were the Central Realty Company, which had turned it over to Massey to sell 12 months earlier. The property consisted of the entire block fronting on Atlanta, Anderson and Winter streets and the alley running from Atlanta to Winer Street.

That week’s edition also reported that Marietta Mayor E.P. Dobbs was being urged by his Atlanta friends to announce as a candidate for state senator of the 35th District, which was composed of Fulton, Clayton and Cobb counties.

A fourth story reported that Sheriff W.E. Swanson, Deputy Sheriff Geo Hicks, a Marietta City Policeman and Bailiff Walter Stephens raided a crap game on a Saturday night just behind the ice plant. Seven black men were playing when officers arrived and five of the men were captured. The following Sunday, a second raid on an “open game” in the woods on Barnes Mill Road lead to the arrest of two more black men.

50 years ago …

In the Tuesday, May 19, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that a Smyrna resident, upset by a growing number of mosquitoes in his neighborhood, wrote a complaint to the city council and included with it a dead mosquito. The insect was attached to the top of the letter with tape.

Another story that day reported that the hazardous bridge on Old Highway 41 on the curve near the Cobb-Fulton line was going to be replaced. The State Highway Department announced that it would award a contract in the next month for construction of a new bridge “to replace the much discussed structure” which spanned the L&N Railroad tracks.

A.D. Little, president of the Cobb Chamber of Commerce announced in the Wednesday, May 20, 1964 paper that Pickwick Draperies leased the McNeel Marble Company building on Sessions Street and planned to expand its Marietta operations. The company was expected to move its entire operation from the old Anderson Motor Company building in downtown Marietta on June 1. Bill Grant, manager of Pickwick, a division of Lowenstein & Sons, said the move would give the company more space and allow the company to double its current 22 employees within a year.

In the Thursday, May 21, 1964 it was reported that Lockheed and Boeing had been authorized to go ahead with studies on the development of a supersonic transport in an announcement from the White House. Officials at Lockheed-California, where the plane would be built if the company got the contract, expressed delight at the announcement. “Selection of our 2,000 mph fixed wing design as one of the airframe winners in the current phase is most reassuring,” said J.F. McBrearty, Lockheed-California vice president of the SST program. Two engine manufacturers, General Electric and Pratt & Whitney, also were approved for contracts to develop engine parts and demonstrate their performance. The Lockheed supersonic transport could carry up to 221 passengers and fly coast to coast in two hours.

A second story that day reported that Marine Reserve pilot Maj. John A. Justice made a wheel-up landing at the Naval Air Station. Maj. Justice was not hurt and the plane was only slightly damaged, according to Marine officials. The landing gear of the FJ “Fury” jet malfunctioned during a routine training flight and Maj. Justice had to bring the craft in for a belly landing.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, May 17, 1994 MDJ it was reported that a prestigious arts festival featuring artists from several states pulled out of the county-owned Cobb Galleria Centre in protest to the county commissioner’s resolution that was critical of the gay lifestyle. While several other conventions had reportedly canceled events, this was the first confirmed case of one pulling out of the convention center because of the resolution. Folk Fest ’94, which had been set for the Galleria in August, was rescheduled to be held at the North Atlanta Trade Center in Gwinnett County.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of May 15
by Damon_Poirier
May 17, 2014 04:00 AM | 154 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at Cheatham’s Hill, the Atherton’s Drug Store explosion, a bus wreck, liquor and the Olympics.

100 years ago …

In Friday, May 15, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a front page story about the $20,000 monument being erected on Cheatham’s Hill by the State of Illinois. The monument’s unveiling was expected to be June 27.

Cheatham’s Hill was one of “the memorable battles of the war. The Federals and Confederates faced each other there for six days and six nights, their lines being so close that the soldiers were in ordinary speaking distance.” The battle was fought from June 27 to July 3 and on the last day the Confederates withdrew because of a flanking movement. The withdrawal was well timed since Union forces had constructed a tunnel far into the hill and placed explosives under the Confederates position intending to blow them up on the 4th of July.

The monument was being built to honor the site where the Illinois regiments fought at the battle. Soldiers, who had been in the battle, bought about 40 acres of land from B.B. Channell. The State of Illinois contracted McNeel Marble Company to use Georgia marble to make the monument, which was to be 28-feet square at the base and 26-feet in height. On the face was to be a bronze group with the central figure being a soldier at parade rest. On one side was to be a woman representing the State of Illinois and on the other a woman representing Peace.

50 years ago …

A proposed constitutional amendment, sponsored by Cobb Rep. Joe Mack Wilson, was reported in the Sunday, May 10, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal that was designed to prevent annexation of Cobb County areas into the city of Atlanta. Wilson was reported as being perturbed by Atlanta officials’ announced intention to annex large neighborhoods which adjoin the city. Leaders in Atlanta cited their annexation drives as a move to prevent the city’s rapidly growing black population from becoming politically dominant.

Also that day, the City of Marietta hired a dog catcher and was expected to begin enforcing the dog control ordinance adopted earlier in the year by the Council. City Manager Walter Brown said that the first phase of the drive was to clear the streets of dogs and pick up “obvious” strays.

An 18-year-old spurned lover was reported in the Monday, May 11, 1964 paper as being held without bond in the county jail after shooting his 15-year-old ex-fiancé’s father at an Allatoona campsite the day before. The father was listed in critical condition at Kennestone Hospital after suffering shotgun injuries to the groin and upper leg. The man’s daughter was also struck in the upper chest with a pellet from the shotgun and was treated then dismissed from the hospital.

Another story in that paper reported that excavation operations continued on the construction of the proposed new Cobb County courthouse. There had been speculation that an attempt might be made to halt the work on the project, but the Clerk of Court John LeCroy said no injunction orders had been filed.

In the Tuesday, May 12, 1964 paper it was reported that the largest commercial order for airplanes designed exclusively for cargo, which totaled $44 million, was placed with Lockheed by The Flying Tiger Line. The eight Super StarLifters order was reported by Flying Tiger president R.W. Prescott and Lockheed-Georgia Company president W.A. Pulver.

An additional story in the edition reported a suit stemming from the Halloween explosion of Atherton’s Drug Store on the Marietta Square had been filed by Jimmy Lee Smith for $250,000 against the Atlanta Gas Light Company. Smith, who was 18, contended that the explosion caused him the loss of his left leg. The suit taken by Smith’s mother charged that the Atlanta Gas Light Company was negligent in maintenance of the gas main leading to the basement of the drugstore. The suit alleged that the gas main was corroded and a small hole developed in the line causing the basement to fill with natural gas and explode.

Cobb County parents, upset by a school bus wreck earlier in the week, were reported in the Wednesday, May 13, 1964 paper as asking the Cobb Board of Education for an explanation. The bus, occupied at the time by the driver and five students, plunged off Franklin Road at the Rottenwood Creek Bridge in Marietta after a wheel came off. School Superintendent Jasper Griffith said an expert mechanic examined the wheel and determined that the cause of the mishap was a worn bearing.

Efforts to bring the wet-dry issue to a vote in Cobb County was reported in the Friday, May 15, 1964 paper as having drawn a severe setback as Ordinary Garvis Sams ruled that a petition submitted and found lacking sufficient names last month was void. Sams’ ruling came as representatives of the Committee to Bring Tax Revenue to Cobb County attempted to file a 305-name amendment to the ill-fated petition. Sams said the petition was now a part of the county records and therefore it was not amendable.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, May 10, 1964 MDJ it was reported that a dozen gay-rights activists took to Interstate 75 and formed a moving blockade to slow traffic and make a point – get the Olympic volleyball preliminaries out of Cobb or face the consequences. Almost a dozen cars entered I-75 at the South Loop about 6 p.m. and drove six-abreast all the way to Atlanta at 40 mph or less with frustrated motorists lining up behind them. Police said they were unable to create a massive traffic jam.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of May 8
by Damon_Poirier
May 09, 2014 03:35 PM | 210 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at the Mary Phagan case, the Cobb County courthouse and Cherokee Indian Chief Nickajack.

100 years ago …

In Friday, May 8, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a story about “world famous detective” William J. Burns being driven from Marietta the previous Friday by a crowd of angry citizens. Burns was working on the Mary Phagan murder case in Atlanta an the testimony which he was alleged dug up on the case had turned “public sentiment strongly against him.”

After being slapped by a citizen at the Brumby garage on Church Street and threatened by the crowd, Burns was reported as running up Church Street to and through the car barn before reaching the Whitlock House, where he took refuge. Judge N.A. Morris, Deputy Sheriff Geo Hicks, Mayor E.P. Dobbs, F.G. Marchman and the editor of the Journal went to the hotel to try to prevent further violence. An agreement was reached with the crowd and Judge Morris that Burns would leave the city immediately and be driven to Atlanta.

There was a front page ad for Traffic in Souls, a six-part Universal Film Manufacturing Company photo drama, at the Princess Theatre and one for The Southern Song Birds, which was dubbed “the biggest and best Vaudeville act ever seen in Marietta” at the Gem Theatre.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, May 3, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal there was a story about Cobb Rep. E.W. “Bill” Teague becoming the fifth candidate in the race to succeed retiring Cobb Commissioner Herbert McCollum as a flurry of late-hour contenders entered the County Democratic Primary. Teague, who had Smyrna Businessman T.L. Dickson as his running mate for deputy, paid his qualifying fee just 30 minutes before the entry deadline for all primary races.

Marietta firemen were reported in the Monday, May 4, 1964 papers as having evacuated the Cobb Theatre while they searched for a bomb. An official at the fire department said that a male caller told someone at the theater to “take heed there’s a bomb in the building.” A search of the building turned up nothing.

Another story that day reported that the “ancient and decaying” Cobb County Courthouse, built in 1872, was “ticketed for beheading.” The courthouse’s tower was to be torn down that week. Plans called for the tower to be leveled to a point just underneath the bricked-in windows under the clock. C.J. Thomas Construction Company of Marietta was in charge of the job.

There was also a story that day about two Fair Oaks boys being recommended for life-saving awards for their bravery in rescuing an eight-year-old Cub Scout from Wildcat Creek. The boy slipped off a rock from where he was fishing and fell into the swollen creek. The two 10-year-old boys jumped into the cold, swirling water and pulled the youth to safety.

In the Tuesday, May 5, 1964 paper it was reported that the Cobb Advisory Board voted to begin work immediately on construction of a new county courthouse. The construction was to include the first increment of plans to provide the county with a complex of government buildings. First to be built was the judicial building – housing courtrooms, judges chambers and administrative offices of the courts. Land for the judicial building had been purchased immediately east of the then-courthouse’s location, a tract bordered by Washington, Waddell, Lawrence and Haynes Streets. The decision came after the board heard Marietta Mayor Howard Atherton and County Attorney Raymond Reed. Atherton gave the findings of a structural inspection and Reed urging the board to start work “tomorrow” on a new building.

The following day, Wednesday, May 6, 1964, there was story that stated Marietta building inspector Fred C. Reinke and Captain Bartow C. Adair of the city’s fire department had completed a two-day investigation with a report about the Cobb County courthouse. The defects discovered in the 87-year-old building, that were known to officials before, included “holes in the room as big as bushel baskets, severe erosion in some of the brickwork, rotting timbers and antiquated construction creating an extreme fire hazard.”

Another story that day reported a fire which erupted when sparks from a welding torch flew into a paint vat and extensively damaged the Stephens Brothers Ornamental Iron works on Canton highway. Chief W.H. Williams of the Fullers Fire Department said that when his men arrived, the roof over one section of the building had already fallen in.

A café operator in Canton was reported in the Thursday, May 7, 1964 paper as being in very serious condition following an incident in which he shot Cherokee County Sheriff Dan Stringer, a longtime friend, and then turned the gun on himself. Cherokee Chief Deputy Clarence Grambling said the man shot himself twice in the side at his home minutes after wounding Sheriff Stringer, who was attempting to disarm the man at the café. The sheriff was shot once in the chest, but reported as in good condition and would undergo surgery to remove the bullet.

20 years ago …

In the Tuesday, May 3, 1994 MDJ it was reported that the grave of supposed Cherokee Indian Chief Nickajack might be in the path of a bridge on the proposed East-West Connector in southeast Cobb, Indian officials told Cobb County. A letter from Charles O. Thurmond, an archeologist and historian for the Dahlonega-based Georgia Tribe of Eastern Cherokee, asked Cobb transportation director Jim Croy for “a complete rundown” of the much-delayed road project – which called for a four-lane road to be built between Macland and Powder Springs roads. Croy responded to the letter saying that Cobb DOT had no information as to the location of the supposed gravesite.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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The Week of May 1
by Damon_Poirier
May 05, 2014 12:35 PM | 220 views | 0 0 comments | 3 3 recommendations | email to a friend | print | permalink

This week’s Time Capsule looks at the Leo Frank case, I-75, liquor, vandalism and Gordon Wysong.

100 years ago …

In Friday, May 1, 1914 edition of the Marietta Journal and Courier, there was a second page story reporting a development in the now famous Mary Phagan murder case. A few days before the paper was published, it was reported that Rev. C.B. Ragsdale, the pastor “of a church at Kirkwood,” visited Leo Frank’s lawyers. Rev. Ragsdale made an affidavit that claimed on the Monday night after Mary Phagan was murdered he went into an alley near the Terminal Station. While he was there two black men arrived and one of them confessed to the other that he had been the one to murder Mary Phagan.

The story reported that Rev. Ragsdale had not known Jim Conley, but that R.L. Barber - an acquaintance of the pastor waiting on him at the entrance to the alley - had recognized him. Ragsdale was also reported as having allowing the trial to go on and Frank to be convicted “without opening his mouth because he did not want to get mixed up in the trial.” Conley, the janitor at the National Pencil Company Factory during the time of the murder, is believed by many historians to be the real murderer of Mary Phagan.

A second story in that week’s edition reported the first anniversary of the death of Mary Phagan. Rev. King of Atlanta brought with him a large party of family and friends who covered the grave in the Marietta City Cemetery with roses and lilies.

50 years ago …

In the Sunday, April 26, 1964 Marietta Daily Journal it was reported that the Marietta City Council voted to sell 24 acres of property to the U.S. government for use in construction of Interstate 75. The land, located east of the Four Lane – now known as U.S. Highway 41 – and south of Beech Street would bring $19,700 into the city treasury. City Manager Walter Brown told the council that the land was “of no practical value” to the city and the price was fair.

A mammoth temperance rally was reported in the Monday, April 27, 1964 paper as being planned for the Marietta Square. Thousands of protestors were expected to participate in the rally, which was sponsored by the Cobb County Evangelical Ministers Association. The ministers said they were holding the mass meeting to protest a liquor referendum that was expected to be voted upon on May 6.

Slick Corporation, an all-cargo airline, was reported in the Tuesday, April 28, 1964 paper as having ordered four Lockheed StarLifters and had obtained an option on two more of the planes. D.W. Rentzel of the Slick Corporation said that his company had decided to order the StarLifters after completing evaluation studies of other planes. The StarLifters to be delivered to Slick were to be L-300B versions, a lengthened version of the C-141A transport currently in production at Lockheed-Georgia.

In the Wednesday, April 29, 1964 paper it was reported that there would not be a liquor referendum in Cobb County on May 6. Cobb Ordinary Garvis Sams cancelled the wet-dry election because the Committee to Bring Tax Revenue to Cobb County lacked a sufficient number of valid signatures on its petition requesting the vote. Sams said the petitioners were “about 200” signatures short of the minimum required by law.

State Highway Department plans for the routing of Interstate Highway 75 north of Marietta were reported in the Thursday, April 30, 1964 paper as bringing strong protests from business and governmental leaders in Cartersville. That town’s mayor, Charles A. Cowan, had called the Cobb Chamber of Commerce and leaders in the north Cobb area for support in the protest. The route, which came to pass, was planned to pass north of Kennesaw close to the site of the proposed Cobb Junior College – known today at Kennesaw State University – and would clip the southwest corner of Cherokee County and cross Lake Allatoona near Red Top Mountain passing east of Cartersville.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation was reported in the Friday, May 1, 1964 paper as having been asked to find the vandals who toppled Civil War cannons and committed other damage at Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park.

20 years ago …

In the Monday, April 25, 1994 MDJ it was reported that the Cobb District Attorney’s Office was seeking the death penalty in eight murder cases, the highest number of such cases ever in the county and the highest of any other county in the metro area. Seven defendants were facing the death penalty, according to District Attorney Tom Charron, who said it was not uncommon to have six or seven death penalty cases awaiting trial in Cobb. However, this was the highest in all his years at the post.

Cobb Commissioner Gordon Wysong, author of the county’s 1993 resolution condemning the gay lifestyle, was reported as picking up opposition during the first day of qualifying. Thomas R. Carter, a 54-year-old unemployed computer consultant from east Cobb, paid the $670 qualifying fee to run as a Democrat against the Republican incumbent. Carter said, if elected, he would vote to rescind the controversial resolution but would not make that a focal point of his campaign. He said it was part of a larger image problem Cobb needed to address. The commotion generated by the resolution’s adoption had not died down since August 1993 and a group of gay-rights activists were using it to try to force Olympic officials to pull preliminary volleyball matches from the Cobb Galleria Centre.

 

Damon Poirier is the Newsroom Administrator for the Marietta Daily Journal.

If you are interested in learning more about the stories that were presented in this week’s column, you can search the newspaper’s digitized microfilm archives online. NewsBank, which hosts the archives for the Marietta Daily Journal, charges a fee for retrieved articles and has various price packages available. If you have any trouble with your username, password or payment options, please contact NewsBank at mariettadaily@newsbank.com.

 

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